Results for 'Susan A. Elmore'

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  1.  39
    Ensuring the Quality, Fairness, and Integrity of Journal Peer Review: A Possible Role of Editors.David B. Resnik & Susan A. Elmore - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (1):169-188.
    A growing body of literature has identified potential problems that can compromise the quality, fairness, and integrity of journal peer review, including inadequate review, inconsistent reviewer reports, reviewer biases, and ethical transgressions by reviewers. We examine the evidence concerning these problems and discuss proposed reforms, including double-blind and open review. Regardless of the outcome of additional research or attempts at reforming the system, it is clear that editors are the linchpin of peer review, since they make decisions that have a (...)
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  2. Enkinaesthesia: The Essential Sensuous Background for Co-Agency.Susan A. J. Stuart - 2012 - In Zravko Radman (ed.), The Background: Knowing Without Thinking. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    The primary aim of this essay is to present a case for a heavily revised notion of heterophenomenology. l will refer to the revised notion as ‘enkinaesthesia’ because of its dependence on the experiential entanglement of our own and the other’s felt action as the sensory background within which all other experience is possible. Enkinaesthesia2 emphasizes two things: (i) the neuromuscular dynamics of the agent, including the givenness and ownership of its experience, and (ii) the entwined, blended and situated co-affective (...)
     
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  3.  37
    A Cross-Linguistic Comparison of Generic Noun Phrases in English and Mandarin.Susan A. Gelman & Twila Tardif - 1998 - Cognition 66 (3):215-248.
    Generic noun phrases (e.g. 'bats live in caves') provide a window onto human concepts. They refer to categories as 'kinds rather than as sets of individuals. Although kind concepts are often assumed to be universal, generic expression varies considerably across languages. For example, marking of generics is less obligatory and overt in Mandarin than in English. How do universal conceptual biases interact with language-specific differences in how generics are conveyed? In three studies, we examined adults' generics in English and Mandarin (...)
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  4.  23
    Categories and Induction in Young Children.Susan A. Gelman & Ellen M. Markman - 1986 - Cognition 23 (3):183-209.
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  5.  31
    Insides and Essences: Early Understandings of the Non- Obvious.Susan A. Gelman & Henry M. Wellman - 1991 - Cognition 38 (3):213-244.
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  6.  39
    How Biological is Essentialism.Susan A. Gelman & Lawrence A. Hirschfeld - 1999 - In D. Medin & S. Atran (eds.), Folkbiology. MIT Press. pp. 403--446.
  7.  71
    Artifacts and Essentialism.Susan A. Gelman - 2013 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (3):449-463.
    Psychological essentialism is an intuitive folk belief positing that certain categories have a non-obvious inner “essence” that gives rise to observable features. Although this belief most commonly characterizes natural kind categories, I argue that psychological essentialism can also be extended in important ways to artifact concepts. Specifically, concepts of individual artifacts include the non-obvious feature of object history, which is evident when making judgments regarding authenticity and ownership. Classic examples include famous works of art (e.g., the Mona Lisa is authentic (...)
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  8.  14
    The Enkinaesthetic Betwixt.Susan A. J. Stuart - 2014 - Constructivist Foundations 10 (1):109-111.
    Open peer commentary on the article “The Uroboros of Consciousness: Between the Naturalisation of Phenomenology and the Phenomenologisation of Nature” by Sebastjan Vörös. Upshot: Vörös proposes that we phenomenologise nature and, whilst I agree with the spirit and direction of his proposal, the 4EA framework, on which he bases his project, is too conservative and is, therefore, unsatisfactory. I present an alternative framework, an enkinaesthetic field, and suggest further ways in which we might explore a non-dichotomised “betwixt” and begin to (...)
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  9.  26
    A Troubled Dance: Doing the Work of Research Ethics Review. [REVIEW]Susan A. Tilley - 2008 - Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (2):91-104.
    The fast growing interest in the work of university ethics review boards is evident in the proliferation of research and literature in the area. This article focuses on a Research Ethics Board (REB) in the Canadian context. In-depth, open-ended interviews with REB members and findings from a qualitative study designed to examine the ethics review of school-based research are used to illustrate points raised in the paper. The author’s experiences as academic researcher, advisor to student researchers and a 3-year term (...)
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  10.  21
    A ‘Curse of Knowledge’ in the Absence of Knowledge? People Misattribute Fluency When Judging How Common Knowledge is Among Their Peers.Susan A. J. Birch, Patricia E. Brosseau-Liard, Taeh Haddock & Siba E. Ghrear - 2017 - Cognition 166:447-458.
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  11.  16
    Remorse and Criminal Justice.Susan A. Bandes - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (1):14-19.
    A defendant’s failure to show remorse is one of the most powerful factors in criminal sentencing, including capital sentencing. Yet there is currently no evidence that remorse can be accurately evaluated in a courtroom. Conversely there is evidence that race and other impermissible factors create hurdles to evaluating remorse. There is thus an urgent need for studies about whether and how remorse can be accurately evaluated. Moreover, there is little evidence that remorse is correlated with future law-abiding behavior or other (...)
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  12.  11
    Shape and Representational Status in Children's Early Naming.Susan A. Gelman & Karen S. Ebeling - 1998 - Cognition 66 (2):B35-B47.
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  13.  24
    A Neuroscientific Approach to Consciousness.Susan A. Greenfield & T. F. T. Collins - 2006 - In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.
  14.  3
    Gender and Race in a Pro-Feminist, Progressive, Mixed-Gender, Mixed-Race Organization.Susan A. Ostrander - 1999 - Gender and Society 13 (5):628-642.
    Feminist researchers have urged more study of how feminist practice is actually accomplished in mixed-gender organizations. Social movement scholars have called for more attention to dynamics of gender and race in social movement organizations, especially to the challenges of maintaining internal solidarity. Based on field observations in a pro-feminist, progressive, mixed-gender, mixed-race social movement organization, this article examines organizational decision-making processes and interpersonal and group dynamics. Gendered and racialized patterns of subordination are both very much in evidence and—at the same (...)
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  15.  42
    Tracking the Actions and Possessions of Agents.Susan A. Gelman, Nicholaus S. Noles & Sarah Stilwell - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (4):599-614.
    We propose that there is a powerful human disposition to track the actions and possessions of agents. In two experiments, 3-year-olds and adults viewed sets of objects, learned a new fact about one of the objects in each set , and were queried about either the taught fact or an unrelated dimension immediately after a spatiotemporal transformation, and after a delay. Adults uniformly tracked object identity under all conditions, whereas children tracked identity more when taught ownership versus labeling information, and (...)
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  16.  22
    A Semiotic Model for Program Evaluation.Susan A. Tucker & John V. Dempsey - 1991 - American Journal of Semiotics 8 (4):73-103.
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  17.  1
    `Natural' and `Contrived' Data: A Sustainable Distinction?Susan A. Speer - 2002 - Discourse Studies 4 (4):511-525.
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  18.  3
    Home Birth and the Maternity Outcomes Emergency: Attending to Race and Gender in Childbirth.Susan A. Stark - 2021 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 14 (1):2-18.
    Childbirth in the United States is in crisis. This is especially true for Black and brown mothers. This childbirth emergency constitutes a failure of the social contract: because society has failed to provide minimally decent care for all birthing mothers, but especially for Black and brown mothers, it is necessary to allow mothers to choose home birth. I amplify the voices of Black and brown scholars and midwives to defend home birth, and I argue that home birth is safe and (...)
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  19. Transcending the `Natural'/`Contrived' Distinction: A Rejoinder to ten Have, Lynch and Potter.Susan A. Speer - 2002 - Discourse Studies 4 (4):543-548.
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  20. Memory, Distortion, and History in the Museum.Susan A. Crane - 1997 - History and Theory 36 (4):44–63.
    Museums are conventionally viewed as institutions dedicated to the conservation of valued objects and the education of the public. Recently, controversies have arisen regarding the representation of history in museums. National museums in America and Germany considered here, such as the Smithsonian's Air and Space Museum, the Holocaust Memorial Museum, and the German Historical Museum, have become sites of contention where national histories and personal memories are often at odds. Contemporary art installations in museums which take historical consciousness as their (...)
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  21.  14
    Young Children’s Preference for Unique Owned Objects.Susan A. Gelman & Natalie S. Davidson - 2016 - Cognition 155:146-154.
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  22.  8
    A Rosetta Stone for Mind and Brain?Susan A. Greenfield - 1998 - In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press. pp. 2--231.
  23. Enkinaesthetic Polyphony: The Underpinning for First-Order Languaging.Susan A. J. Stuart & Paul J. Thibault - 2015 - In Ulrike M. Lüdtke (ed.), Emotion in Language: Theory – Research – Application. pp. 113-133.
    We contest two claims: that language, understood as the processing of abstract symbolic forms, is an instrument of cognition and rational thought, and that conventional notions of turn-taking, exchange structure, and move analysis, are satisfactory as a basis for theorizing communication between living, feeling agents. We offer an enkinaesthetic theory describing the reciprocal affective neuro-muscular dynamical flows and tensions of co- agential dialogical sense-making relations. This “enkinaesthetic dialogue” is characterised by a preconceptual experientially recursive temporal dynamics forming the deep extended (...)
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  24.  20
    Feeling Our Way: Enkinaesthetic Enquiry and Immanent Intercorporeality.Susan A. J. Stuart - 2017 - In Christian Meyer, Jurgen Streeck & J. Scott Jordan (eds.), Intercorporeality: Emerging Socialities in Interaction. pp. 104-140.
    Every action, touch, utterance, and look, every listening, taste, smell, and feel is a living question; but it is no ordinary propositional one-by-one question, rather it is a plenisentient sensing and probing non-propositional enquiry about how our world is, in its present continuous sense, and in relation to how we anticipate its becoming. I will take this assumption as my first premise and, by using the notion of enkinaesthesia, I will explore the ways in which an agent’s affectively-saturated co-engagement with (...)
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  25.  17
    History and Essence in Human Cognition.Susan A. Gelman, Meredith A. Meyer & Nicholaus S. Noles - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):142 - 143.
    Bullot & Reber (B&R) provide compelling evidence that sensitivity to context, history, and design stance are crucial to theories of art appreciation. We ask how these ideas relate to broader aspects of human cognition. Further open questions concern how psychological essentialism contributes to art appreciation and how essentialism regarding created artifacts (such as art) differs from essentialism in other domains.
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  26.  47
    Machine Consciousness: Cognitive and Kinaesthetic Imagination.Susan A. J. Stuart - 2007 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (7):141-153.
    Machine consciousness exists already in organic systems and it is only a matter of time -- and some agreement -- before it will be realised in reverse-engineered organic systems and forward- engineered inorganic systems. The agreement must be over the preconditions that must first be met if the enterprise is to be successful, and it is these preconditions, for instance, being a socially-embedded, structurally-coupled and dynamic, goal-directed entity that organises its perceptual input and enacts its world through the application of (...)
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  27. How Might the Brain Generate Consciousness?Susan A. Greenfield - 1997 - Communication and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly Journal 30 (3-4):285-300.
  28.  2
    Scientific and Folk Theories of Viral Transmission: A Comparison of COVID-19 and the Common Cold.Danielle Labotka & Susan A. Gelman - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Disease transmission is a fruitful domain in which to examine how scientific and folk theories interrelate, given laypeople’s access to multiple sources of information to explain events of personal significance. The current paper reports an in-depth survey of U.S. adults’ causal reasoning about two viral illnesses: a novel, deadly disease that has massively disrupted everyone’s lives, and a familiar, innocuous disease that has essentially no serious consequences. Participants received a series of closed-ended and open-ended questions probing their reasoning about disease (...)
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  29.  33
    Differences in Preschoolers’ and Adults’ Use of Generics About Novel Animals and Artifacts: A Window Onto a Conceptual Divide.Amanda C. Brandone & Susan A. Gelman - 2009 - Cognition 110 (1):1-22.
    Children and adults commonly produce more generic noun phrases (e.g., birds fly) about animals than artifacts. This may reflect differences in participants’ generic knowledge about specific animals/artifacts (e.g., dogs/chairs), or it may reflect a more general distinction. To test this, the current experiments asked adults and preschoolers to generate properties about novel animals and artifacts (Experiment 1: real animals/artifacts; Experiments 2 and 3: matched pairs of maximally similar, novel animals/artifacts). Data demonstrate that even without prior knowledge about these items, the (...)
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  30.  18
    Is It Immoral To Punish The Heedless And Clueless? A Comment On Alexander, Ferzan And Morse: Crime And Culpability.Susan A. Bandes - 2010 - Law and Philosophy 29 (4):433-453.
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  31.  66
    Early Word-Learning Entails Reference, Not Merely Associations.Sandra R. Waxman & Susan A. Gelman - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (6):258-263.
  32.  27
    Response to Sloutsky: Taking Development Seriously: Theories Cannot Emerge From Associations Alone.Susan A. Gelman & Sandra R. Waxman - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (8):332-333.
  33. From Agency to Apperception: Through Kinaesthesia to Cognition and Creation.Susan A. J. Stuart - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (4):255-264.
    My aim in this paper is to go some way towards showing that the maintenance of hard and fast dichotomies, like those between mind and body, and the real and the virtual, is untenable, and that technological advance cannot occur with being cognisant of its reciprocal ethical implications. In their place I will present a softer enactivist ontology through which I examine the nature of our engagement with technology in general and with virtual realities in particular. This softer ontology is (...)
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  34.  83
    The Mindsized Mashup Mind Isn't Supersized After All.Susan A. J. Stuart - 2010 - Analysis 70 (1):174-183.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  35.  35
    Returning a Research Participant's Genomic Results to Relatives: Analysis and Recommendations.Susan M. Wolf, Rebecca Branum, Barbara A. Koenig, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan A. Berry, Laura M. Beskow, Mary B. Daly, Conrad V. Fernandez, Robert C. Green, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Noralane M. Lindor, P. Pearl O'Rourke, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Mark A. Rothstein, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):440-463.
    Genomic research results and incidental findings with health implications for a research participant are of potential interest not only to the participant, but also to the participant's family. Yet investigators lack guidance on return of results to relatives, including after the participant's death. In this paper, a national working group offers consensus analysis and recommendations, including an ethical framework to guide investigators in managing this challenging issue, before and after the participant's death.
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  36.  80
    Conscious Machines: Memory, Melody and Muscular Imagination. [REVIEW]Susan A. J. Stuart - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):37-51.
    A great deal of effort has been, and continues to be, devoted to developing consciousness artificially (A small selection of the many authors writing in this area includes: Cotterill (J Conscious Stud 2:290–311, 1995 , 1998 ), Haikonen ( 2003 ), Aleksander and Dunmall (J Conscious Stud 10:7–18, 2003 ), Sloman ( 2004 , 2005 ), Aleksander ( 2005 ), Holland and Knight ( 2006 ), and Chella and Manzotti ( 2007 )), and yet a similar amount of effort has (...)
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  37.  31
    Expressing Generic Concepts with and Without a Language Model.Susan Goldin-Meadow, Susan A. Gelman & Carolyn Mylander - 2005 - Cognition 96 (2):109-126.
  38.  6
    Electronic Medical Record Documentation of Tobacco Cessation Support at Eight Community Safety‐Net Clinics with a High Prevalence of Tobacco Use.Susan A. Flocke, Steve Lewis, Eileen Seeholzer, India Gill, Elizabeth Antognoli, Jeanmarie C. Rose & Thomas E. Love - 2019 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 25 (3):507-513.
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  39.  40
    So It Is, So It Shall Be: Group Regularities License Children's Prescriptive Judgments.Steven O. Roberts, Susan A. Gelman & Arnold K. Ho - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S3).
    When do descriptive regularities become prescriptive norms? We examined children's and adults' use of group regularities to make prescriptive judgments, employing novel groups that engaged in morally neutral behaviors. Participants were introduced to conforming or non-conforming individuals. Children negatively evaluated non-conformity, with negative evaluations declining with age. These effects were replicable across competitive and cooperative intergroup contexts and stemmed from reasoning about group regularities rather than reasoning about individual regularities. These data provide new insights into children's group concepts and have (...)
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  40.  12
    Evaluation of the Fibromyalgia Diagnostic Screen in Clinical Practice.Susan A. Martin, Cheryl D. Coon, Lori D. McLeod, Arthi Chandran & Lesley M. Arnold - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (2):158-165.
  41.  11
    Bewitchment, Biology, or Both: The Co-Existence of Natural and Supernatural Explanatory Frameworks Across Development.Cristine H. Legare & Susan A. Gelman - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (4):607-642.
  42.  6
    Divorce in the Libyan Family: A Study Based on the Sijills of the Shariʿa Courts of Ajdābiyya and KufraDivorce in the Libyan Family: A Study Based on the Sijills of the Sharia Courts of Ajdabiyya and Kufra.Susan A. Spectorsky & Aharon Layish - 1994 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 114 (4):678.
  43.  34
    Psychological Models Often Assume That Young Children Learn Words and Concepts Bymeansof Associative Learning Mechanisms, Without the Need to Posit Any Innate Predispositions. For Example, Smith, Jones, and Landau (1996) Propose That Children Learn Concepts by Hearing Specific Linguistic Frames While Viewing Specific Object Properties. The Environment Provides All the Information That Children Need; the Conjunction of Sights and Sounds is Proposed to Be Sufficient to Enable Children. [REVIEW]Susan A. Gelman - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers (ed.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York. pp. 1--198.
  44.  25
    Two Insights About Naming in the Preschool Child.Susan A. Gelman - 2005 - In Peter Carruthers (ed.), The Innate Mind: Structure and Contents. New York: Oxford University Press New York. pp. 198--215.
    This chapter examines associationist models of cognitive development, focusing on the development of naming in young children — the process by which young children learn of construct the meanings of words and concepts. It presents two early-emerging insights that children possess about the nature of naming. These insights are: essentialism: certain words map onto nonobvious, underlying causal features, and genericity: certain expressions map onto generic kinds as opposed to particular instances. The chapter discusses empirical studies with preschool children to support (...)
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  45.  35
    Shepherds of the Lord: Priests and Episcopal Statutes in the Carolingian Period. Carine van Rhijn.Susan A. Keefe - 2009 - Speculum 84 (1):208-209.
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  46.  24
    Thinking About Possibilities.Susan A. Gelman - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (8):341-342.
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  47.  14
    Distinct Labels Attenuate 15-Month-Olds’ Attention to Shape in an Inductive Inference Task.Susan A. Graham, Jean Keates, Ena Vukatana & Melanie Khu - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  48.  22
    Defining Essentialism.Susan A. Gelman - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (9):404-409.
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  49.  14
    A Dollar Is a Dollar Is a Dollar, or Is It? Insights From Children's Reasoning About “Dirty Money”.Arber Tasimi & Susan A. Gelman - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (4):e12950.
    Money can take many forms—a coin or a bill, a payment for an automobile or a prize for an award, a piece from the 1989 series or the 2019 series, and so on—but despite this, money is designed to represent an amount and only that. Thus, a dollar is a dollar, in the sense that money is fungible. But when adults ordinarily think about money, they think about it in terms of its source, and in particular, its moral source (e.g., (...)
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  50. I Need To Listen To What She Says.Susan A. Manchester - 1997 - Feminist Studies 23 (3):548.
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