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  1.  14
    Book Review: Wittgenstein and Critical Theory. [REVIEW]Susan B. Brill - 1995 - Philosophy and Literature 19 (2).
  2.  5
    Feminist Theory and the Classics (Review).Susan B. Brill - 1994 - Philosophy and Literature 18 (2):400-401.
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  3.  5
    Book Review: The Culture of Literacy. [REVIEW]Susan B. Brill - 1995 - Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):385-386.
  4. Limiting Investigations: Ludwig Wittgenstein and Critical Theory.Susan B. Brill - 1991 - Dissertation, The University of New Mexico
    Much of the philosophy of Ludwig Wittgenstein can be brought to bear directly on the theoretical and critical determinations made by literature scholars. Like a language game which consists of a structural center in its essential grammar or rules and a temporal and contingent diversity in its actual uses or playing moves, Wittgensteinian philosophy as adapted herein for literary criticism points us toward a strategy of descriptive investigations whose coherence and usefulness is demonstrated in its circumstantial adaptability and responsiveness to (...)
     
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  5. Wittgenstein and Critical Theory: Beyond Postmodern Criticism and Toward Descriptive Investigations.Susan B. Brill - 1997 - Philosophical Quarterly 47 (186):103-106.
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  6. Wittgenstein & Critical Theory: Beyond Postmodern Criticism and Toward Descriptive Investigations.Susan B. Brill - 1994 - Ohio University Press.
    The crucial point of Brill’s study is that of fit: which critical methods prove most useful towards opening up which texts? Close investigations into the parameters of the language games of texts, critics, and methods enable us to determine which paths to take towards more complete descriptive analyses and critique. Such an emphasis on the philosophical method of Ludwig Wittgenstein reorients literary criticism to involve a conjoint responsibility to both reader and text as the literary critic assumes the humbler role (...)
     
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