Results for 'Susan Brajtman'

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  1.  8
    Relational and embodied knowing: Nursing ethics within the interprofessional team.David Wright & Susan Brajtman - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (1):20-30.
    In this article we attempt to situate nursing within the interprofessional care team with respect to processes of ethical practice and ethical decision making. After briefly reviewing the concept of interprofessionalism, the idea of a nursing ethic as ‘unique’ within the context of an interprofessional team will be explored. We suggest that nursing’s distinct perspective on the moral matters of health care stem not from any privileged vantage point but rather from knowledge developed through the daily activities of nursing practice. (...)
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  2.  20
    Relational ethics of delirium care: Findings from a hospice ethnography.David Kenneth Wright, Susan Brajtman & Mary Ellen Macdonald - 2018 - Nursing Inquiry 25 (3):e12234.
    Delirium, a common syndrome in terminally ill people, presents specific challenges to a good death in end‐of‐life care. This paper examines the relational engagement between hospice nurses and their patients in a context of end‐of‐life delirium. Ethnographic fieldwork spanning 15 months was conducted at a freestanding residential hospice in eastern Canada. A shared value system was apparent within the nursing community of hospice; patients’ comfort and dignity were deemed most at stake and therefore commanded nurses’ primary attention. This overarching commitment (...)
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  3.  43
    Whose Science? Whose Knowledge? Thinking from Women's Lives.Susan Babbitt & Sandra Harding - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (2):287.
  4. The Moral of Moral Luck.Susan Wolf - 2001 - Philosophic Exchange 31 (1).
    This essay is primarily concerned with one type of moral luck – luck in how things turn out. Do acts that actually lead to harm deserve the same treatment as similar acts that, by chance, do not lead to harm? This paper argues that we must recognize the truth in two, opposing tendencies in such cases.
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  5.  16
    Regarding the pain of others.Susan Sontag - 2003 - Diogène 201 (1):127-.
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  6. Surviving Sexual Violence: A Philosophical Perspective.Susan J. Brison - 2019 - In Wanda Teays (ed.), Analyzing Violence Against Women. Cham: Springer. pp. 11-26.
    This chapter examines sexual assault from the point of view of a survivor, indicating that its consequences extend beyond the emotional or physical. Philosophical issues are raised by this experience, such as its effects on personal identity, notions of “harm“Notions of "harm", the role of denial, victim blaming, as well as its political implications for gender equality. Given the significance of these concerns and the extent of sexual assaults, it is imperative the harms of violence against women be taken more (...)
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  7. Anorexia Nervosa: Psychopathology as the Crystallization of Culture.Susan Bordo - 1985 - Philosophical Forum 17 (2):73.
     
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  8.  28
    The Construction of Social Reality.Susan Babbitt - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (4):608.
    To explain the causal relation between institutional rules and people’s actions and expectations, Searle relies upon his concept of the Background, the thesis that intentional states function only given a background of capacities that do not themselves consist in intentional phenomena. Any sentence, for instance, only acquires truth conditions or other conditions of satisfaction against a background of capacities, dispositions, know-how, etc. that are not themselves part of the content of the sentence. The Background also structures expectations. La Rouchefoucauld said, (...)
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  9.  84
    The relational self: An interpersonal social-cognitive theory.Susan M. Andersen & Serena Chen - 2002 - Psychological Review 109 (4):619-645.
  10.  46
    Können Babys Traumata im Gedächtnis behalten?Susan W. Coates - 2018 - Psyche 72 (12):993-1021.
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  11.  84
    Constructing Inequality.Susan Bickford - 2000 - Political Theory 28 (3):355-376.
    Our urban problem is how to revive the reality of the outside as a dimension of human experience.Richard Sennett.
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  12. Experimentation on Analogue Models.Susan G. Sterrett - 2017 - In Springer handbook of model-based science (2017). Springer. pp. 857-878.
    Summary Analogue models are actual physical setups used to model something else. They are especially useful when what we wish to investigate is difficult to observe or experiment upon due to size or distance in space or time: for example, if the thing we wish to investigate is too large, too far away, takes place on a time scale that is too long, does not yet exist or has ceased to exist. The range and variety of analogue models is too (...)
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  13.  37
    Free Speech in the Digital Age.Susan J. Brison & Katharine Gelber (eds.) - 2018 - Oup Usa.
    This collection of thirteen new essays is the first to examine, from a range of disciplinary perspectives, how the new technologies and global reach of the Internet are changing the theory and practice of free speech.
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  14. Physically Similar Systems: a history of the concept.Susan G. Sterrett - 2017 - In Magnani Lorenzo & Bertolotti Tommaso Wayne (eds.), Springer Handbook of Model-Based Science. Springer. pp. 377-412.
    The concept of similar systems arose in physics, and appears to have originated with Newton in the seventeenth century. This chapter provides a critical history of the concept of physically similar systems, the twentieth century concept into which it developed. The concept was used in the nineteenth century in various fields of engineering, theoretical physics and theoretical and experimental hydrodynamics. In 1914, it was articulated in terms of ideas developed in the eighteenth century and used in nineteenth century mathematics and (...)
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  15.  40
    Remorse and Criminal Justice.Susan A. Bandes - 2016 - Emotion Review 8 (1):14-19.
    A defendant’s failure to show remorse is one of the most powerful factors in criminal sentencing, including capital sentencing. Yet there is currently no evidence that remorse can be accurately evaluated in a courtroom. Conversely there is evidence that race and other impermissible factors create hurdles to evaluating remorse. There is thus an urgent need for studies about whether and how remorse can be accurately evaluated. Moreover, there is little evidence that remorse is correlated with future law-abiding behavior or other (...)
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  16.  14
    Aristotle on the Voluntary.Susan Sauvé Meyer - 2006 - In Richard Kraut (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 137-157.
    The prelims comprise: The Significance of Voluntariness Ordinary and Philosophical Notions of Voluntariness Constraint and Compulsion Force and Contrariety in the NE Knowledge and Ignorance The Platonic Asymmetry Thesis Responsibility for Character References Further reading.
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  17.  43
    Psychometric origins of depression.Susan McPherson & David Armstrong - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):127-143.
    This article examines the historical construction of depression over about a hundred years, employing the social life of methods as an explanatory framework. Specifically, it considers how emerging methodologies in the measurement of psychological constructs contributed to changes in epistemological approaches to mental illness and created the conditions of possibility for major shifts in the construction of depression. While depression was once seen as a feature of psychotic personality, measurement technologies made it possible for it to be reconstructed as changeable (...)
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  18. Pornography and Silence, Culture's Revenge Against Nature.Susan Griffin - 1981
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  19.  45
    The Law of Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: Establishing Researchers' Duties.Susan M. Wolf, Jordan Paradise & Charlisse Caga-Anan - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):361-383.
    Technology has outpaced the capacity of researchers performing research on human participants to interpret all data generated and handle those data responsibly. This poses a critical challenge to existing rules governing human subjects research. The technologies used in research to generate images, scans, and data can now produce so much information that there is significant potential for incidental findings, findings generated in the course of research but beyond the aims of the study. Neuroimaging scans may visualize the entire brain and (...)
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  20. Feminist Skepticism and the "Maleness" of Philosophy.Susan Bordo - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy 85 (11):619-629.
  21.  5
    Consciousness.Susan J. Blackmore - 2018 - New York, NY: Routledge. Edited by Emily Troscianko.
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  22.  34
    The Challenge of Incidental Findings.Susan M. Wolf - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):216-218.
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  23. Speech, Harm, and the Mind-Body Problem in First Amendment Jurisprudence.Susan J. Brison - 1998 - Legal Theory 4 (1):39-61.
    “Sticks and stones will break my bones,” Justice Scalia pronounced from the bench in oral arguments in Schenck v. Pro-Choice Network, “but words can never hurt me. That's the First Amendment,” he added. Jay Alan Sekulow, the lawyer for the petitioners, anti-abortion protesters who had been enjoined from moving closer than fifteen feet away from those entering an abortion facility, was obviously pleased by this characterization of the right to free speech, replying, “That's certainly our position on it, and that (...)
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  24.  16
    Public Bioethics and Publics: Consensus, Boundaries, and Participation in Biomedical Science Policy.Susan E. Kelly - 2003 - Science, Technology and Human Values 28 (3):339-364.
    Public bioethics bodies are used internationally as institutions with the declared aims of facilitating societal debate and providing policy advice in certain areas of scientific inquiry raising questions of values and legitimate science. In the United States, bioethical experts in these institutions use the language of consensus building to justify and define the outcome of the enterprise. However, the implications of public bioethics at science-policy boundaries are underexamined. Political interest in such bodies continues while their influence on societal consensus, public (...)
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  25.  16
    Moving beyond Table 1: A critical review of the literature addressing social determinants of health in chronic condition symptom cluster research.Susan C. Grayson, Sofie A. Patzak, Gabriela Dziewulski, Lingxue Shen, Caitlin Dreisbach, Maichou Lor, Alex Conway & Theresa A. Koleck - 2023 - Nursing Inquiry 30 (1):e12519.
    Variability in the symptom experience in patients diagnosed with chronic conditions may be related to social determinants of health (SDoH). The purpose of this critical review was to (1) summarize the existing literature on SDoH and symptom clusters (i.e., multiple, co‐occurring symptoms) in patients diagnosed with common chronic conditions, (2) evaluate current variables and measures used to represent SDoH, (3) identify gaps in the evidence base, and (4) provide recommendations for the incorporation of SDoH into future symptom cluster research. We (...)
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  26.  44
    Can animal data translate to innovations necessary for a new era of patient-centred and individualised healthcare? Bias in preclinical animal research.Susan Bridgwood Green - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-14.
    BackgroundThe public and healthcare workers have a high expectation of animal research which they perceive as necessary to predict the safety and efficacy of drugs before testing in clinical trials. However, the expectation is not always realised and there is evidence that the research often fails to stand up to scientific scrutiny and its 'predictive value' is either weak or absent.DiscussionProblems with the use of animals as models of humans arise from a variety of biases and systemic failures including: 1) (...)
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  27.  6
    Plantinga and the Free Will Defense.Susan L. Anderson - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 62 (3):274-281.
  28.  63
    Passion, Impulse, and Action in Stoicism.Susan Sauvé Meyer - 2018 - Rhizomata 6 (1):109-134.
    A familiar interpretation of the Stoic doctrine of the πάθη runs as follows: The Stoics claim the πάθη are impulses. The Stoics take impulses to be causes of action. So, the Stoics think the πάθη are causes of action Premise is uncontroversial, but the evidence for needs to be reconsidered. I argue that the Stoics have two distinct but related conceptions of ὁρμή – a psychological construal and a behavioural construal. On the psychological construal is true, but there is strong (...)
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  29.  23
    The Continuing Evolution of Ethical Standards for Genomic Sequencing in Clinical Care: Restoring Patient Choice.Susan M. Wolf - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (3):333-340.
    Developing ethical standards for clinical use of large-scale genome and exome sequencing has proven challenging, in part due to the inevitability of incidental or secondary findings. Policy of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics has evolved but remains problematic. In 2013, ACMG issued policy recommending mandatory analysis of 56 extra genes whenever sequencing was ordered for any indication, in order to ascertain positive findings in pathogenic and actionable genes. Widespread objection yielded a 2014 amendment allowing patients to opt-out (...)
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  30.  29
    Feeling our way: enkinaesthetic enquiry and immanent intercorporeality.Susan A. J. Stuart - 2017 - In Christian Meyer, Jürgen Streeck & J. Scott Jordan (eds.), Intercorporeality: Emerging Socialities in Interaction. Oxford University Press. pp. 104-140.
    Every action, touch, utterance, and look, every listening, taste, smell, and feel is a living question; but it is no ordinary propositional one-by-one question, rather it is a plenisentient sensing and probing non-propositional enquiry about how our world is, in its present continuous sense, and in relation to how we anticipate its becoming. I will take this assumption as my first premise and, by using the notion of enkinaesthesia, I will explore the ways in which an agent’s affectively-saturated co-engagement with (...)
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  31.  6
    Passion and Compassion in Early Christianity.Susan Wessel - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines how the early Christian elite articulated and cultivated the affective dimensions of compassion in a Roman world that promoted emotional tranquillity as the path to human flourishing. Drawing upon a wide range of early Christians from both east and west, Wessel situates each author in the broader cultural and intellectual context. The reader is introduced to the diverse conditions in which Christians felt and were urged to feel compassion in exemplary ways, and in which warnings were sounded (...)
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  32.  10
    Leaving School.Susan Ford Wiltshire - 2017 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 111 (1):123-125.
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  33.  35
    Chapter 4. Self-Movement and External Causation.Susan Sauvé Meyer - 2017 - In Mary Louise Gill & James G. Lennox (eds.), Self-Motion: From Aristotle to Newton. Princeton University Press. pp. 65-80.
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  34.  23
    Is It True What They Say about Tarski?Susan Haack - 1976 - Philosophy 51 (197):323 - 336.
    Popper welcomes Tarski's theory of truth as a vindication of the ‘objective or absolute or correspondence theory of truth’: -/- Tarski's greatest achievement, and the real significance of his theory for the philosophy of the empirical sciences, is that he rehabilitated the correspondence theory of absolute or objective truth … He vindicated the free use of the intuitive idea of truth as correspondence to the facts ….
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  35.  18
    Darwin’s analogy between artificial and natural selection: how does it go?Susan G. Sterrett - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 33 (1):151-168.
    View/download or read postprint via a streaming viewer with the turning page feature in SOAR, or click on the DOI link to access the publisher's copy of this article.
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  36.  4
    Some preliminaries to ontology.Haack Susan - 1976 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 5 (4):457-474.
    In philosophy one runs the risk of two kinds of criticism: that the answer one gives to a question is false or otherwise inadequate; or, perhaps worse, that the question one is trying to answer is itself misconceived. Carnap has directed a criticism of the second kind against traditional ontological disputes; the supposed issue between nominalists and realists is, according to him, devoid of cognitive content. This view is, of course, of a piece with Carnap’s general antipathy to metaphysical questions: (...)
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  37.  6
    Surviving sexual violence: A philosophical perspective.Susan T. Brison - 1993 - Journal of Social Philosophy 24 (1):5-22.
  38.  17
    Toward a Theory of Process.Susan M. Wolf - 1992 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (4):278-290.
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  39.  23
    The Past, Present, and Future of Informed Consent in Research and Translational Medicine.Susan M. Wolf, Ellen Wright Clayton & Frances Lawrenz - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (1):7-11.
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  40. How might the brain generate consciousness?Susan A. Greenfield - 1997 - Communication and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly Journal 30 (3-4):285-300.
  41. Enkinaesthesia: the fundamental challenge for machine consciousness.Susan A. J. Stuart - 2011 - International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (1):145-162.
    In this short paper I will introduce an idea which, I will argue, presents a fundamental additional challenge to the machine consciousness community. The idea takes the questions surrounding phenomenology, qualia and phenomenality one step further into the realm of intersubjectivity but with a twist, and the twist is this: that an agent’s intersubjective experience is deeply felt and necessarily co-affective; it is enkinaesthetic, and only through enkinaesthetic awareness can we establish the affective enfolding which enables first the perturbation, and (...)
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  42.  28
    Introduction.Genevieve LeBaron, Susan Ferguson, Sara R. Farris & Angela Dimitrakaki - 2016 - Historical Materialism 24 (2):25-37.
    The 2011 Historical Materialism Conference in London saw the launch of a Marxist-Feminist set of panels. This issue is inspired by the success of those panels, and the remarkably sustained interest in reviving and moving beyond older debates and discussions. The special issue’s focus, Social-Reproduction Feminism, reflects and contextualises the ongoing work and engagement with that thematic that has threaded through the conferences in the 2010s. This Introduction provides a summary overview of the Social-Reproduction Feminism framework, situating it within Marxist-Feminist (...)
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  43.  69
    Beauty (Re)Discovers the Male Body.Susan Bordo - 2000 - In Peg Zeglin Brand (ed.), Beauty Matters. Indiana University Press. pp. 112-154.
    Putting classical art to the side for the moment, the naked and near-naked female body became an object of mainstream consumption first in Playboy and its imitators, then in movies, and only then in fashion photographs. With the male body, the trajectory has been different. Fashion has taken the lead, the movies have followed. Hollywood may have been a chest-fest in the fifties, but it was male clothing designers [e.g., Calvin Klein] who went south and violated the really powerful taboos--not (...)
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  44.  8
    How Mathematics Figures Differently in Exact Solutions, Simulations, and Physical Models.Susan G. Sterrett - 2023 - In Lydia Patton & Erik Curiel (eds.), Working Toward Solutions in Fluid Dynamics and Astrophysics: What the Equations Don’t Say. Springer Verlag. pp. 5-30.
    The role of mathematics in scientific practice is too readily relegated to that of formulating equations that model or describe what is being investigated, and then finding solutions to those equations. I survey the role of mathematics in: 1. Exact solutions of differential equations, especially conformal mapping; and 2. Simulations of solutions to differential equations via numerical methods and via agent-based models; and 3. The use of experimental models to solve equations (a) via physical analogies based on similarity of the (...)
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  45.  28
    Understanding Love: Philosophy, Film, and Fiction.Susan R. Wolf & Christopher Grau (eds.) - 2014 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    A unique and interdisciplinary collection in which scholars from Philosophy join those from Film Studies, English, and Comparative Literature to explore the nature and limits of love through in-depth reflection on particular works of literature and film.
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  46. Silvan Tomkins, arte y afecto.Susan Best - 2019 - In Irene Depetris Chauvin & Natalia Taccetta (eds.), Afectos, historia y cultura visual: una aproximación indisciplinada. Buenos Aires, Argentina: Prometeo Libros.
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  47.  1
    Re-Thinking Resistance: On Welch and Foucault.Susan Birden - 2002 - Philosophy of Education 58:110-113.
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  48.  3
    The Authority of Experience: Essays on Buddhism and Psychology. Edited by John Pickering.Susan Blackmore - 1999 - Buddhist Studies Review 16 (1):129-132.
    The Authority of Experience: Essays on Buddhism and Psychology. Edited by John Pickering. Curzon Press, Richmond 1997. xviii, 252 pp. Cloth £40, pbk £14.99. ISBN 0-7007-0450-7/0455-8.
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  49.  4
    Letters to a mother on the philosophy of Froebel.Susan EBlow - 1899 - New York,: D. Appleton and company.
    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in (...)
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  50. Palliative care.Susan D. Block - 2014 - In Timothy E. Quill & Franklin G. Miller (eds.), Palliative care and ethics. New York: Oxford University Press.
     
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