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Susan Duncan [6]Susan D. Duncan [2]Susan E. Duncan [1]
  1.  15
    Categories and Particulars: Prototype Effects in Estimating Spatial Location.Janellen Huttenlocher, Larry V. Hedges & Susan Duncan - 1991 - Psychological Review 98 (3):352-376.
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  2.  27
    Evolving Trends in Nurse Regulation: What Are the Policy Impacts for Nursing's Social Mandate?Susan Duncan, Sally Thorne & Patricia Rodney - 2015 - Nursing Inquiry 22 (1):27-38.
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    Growth Points in Thinking-for-Speaking.David McNeill & Susan D. Duncan - 1998
    Many bilingual speakers believe they engage in different forms of thinking when they shift languages. This experience of entering different thought worlds can be explained with the hypothesis that languages induce different forms of `thinking-for-speaking'-- thinking generated, as Slobin (1987) says, because of the requirements of a linguistic code. "`Thinking for speaking' involves picking those characteristics that (a) fit some conceptualization of the event, and (b) are readily encodable in the language"[2] (p. 435). That languages differ in their thinking-for-speaking demands (...)
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  4.  52
    Growth Points From the Very Beginning.David McNeill, Susan Duncan, Jonathan Cole, Shaun Gallagher & Bennett Bertenthal - 2010 - In M. Arbib D. Bickerton (ed.), The Emergence of Protolanguage: Holophrasis Vs Compositionality. John Benjamins. pp. 117-132.
    Did protolanguage users use discrete words that referred to objects, actions, locations, etc., and then, at some point, combine them; or on the contrary did they have words that globally indexed whole semantic complexes, and then come to divide them? Our answer is: early humans were forming language units consisting of global and discrete dimensions of semiosis in dynamic opposition. These units of thinking-for-speaking, or ‘growth points’ (GPs) were, jointly, analog imagery (visuo-spatio-motoric) and categorically-contrastive (-emic) linguistic encodings. This discrete-global duality (...)
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    The Facial Action Coding System for Characterization of Human Affective Response to Consumer Product-Based Stimuli: A Systematic Review.Elizabeth A. Clark, J'Nai Kessinger, Susan E. Duncan, Martha Ann Bell, Jacob Lahne, Daniel L. Gallagher & Sean F. O'Keefe - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  6.  16
    Gestural Imagery and Cohesion in Normal and Impaired Discourse.Susan Duncan - 2008 - In Ipke Wachsmuth, Manuela Lenzen & Günther Knoblich (eds.), Embodied Communication in Humans and Machines. Oxford University Press. pp. 305--328.
  7. Growth Points From the Very Beginning.David McNeill, Susan D. Duncan, Jonathan Cole, Shaun Gallagher & Bennett Bertenthal - 2008 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 9 (1):117-132.
    Early humans formed language units consisting of global and discrete dimensions of semiosis in dynamic opposition, or ‘growth points.’ At some point, gestures gained the power to orchestrate actions, manual and vocal, with significances other than those of the actions themselves, giving rise to cognition framed in dual terms. However, our proposal emphasizes natural selection of joint gesture-speech, not ‘gesture-first’ in language origin.
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    Implementing a Non-Modular Theory of Language Production in an Embodied.Timo Sowa, Stefan Kopp, Susan Duncan, David McNeill & Ipke Wachsmuth - 2008 - In Ipke Wachsmuth, Manuela Lenzen & Günther Knoblich (eds.), Embodied Communication in Humans and Machines. Oxford University Press.
  9. Implementing a Non-Modular Theory of Language Production in an Embodied Conversational Agent.Timo Sowa, Stefan Kopp, Susan Duncan, David McNeill & Wachsmuth & Ipke - 2008 - In Ipke Wachsmuth, Manuela Lenzen & Günther Knoblich (eds.), Embodied Communication in Humans and Machines. Oxford University Press.
     
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