Results for 'Susan Gail Albersheim'

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  1.  2
    Ethical Care for Infants with Conditions Not Curable with Intensive Care.Bethan J. Everett & Susan G. Albersheim - 2011 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 22 (1):54.
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  2.  31
    Gail Tulloch, Mill and Sexual Equality, Hemel Hempstead and Colorado, Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1989, Pp. 212.Susan Mendus - 1990 - Utilitas 2 (2):325.
  3. Cleveland Amory Ranch of Dreams Middlesex, UK: Viking Penguin, 1997, 288 Pp. Susan G. Davis Spectacular Nature: Corporate Culture and the Sea World Experience. [REVIEW]Gail A. Eisnitz, Moira Ferguson, Elizabeth Hess, Barbara Hodgson, Alan Holland, Andrew Johnson, James M. Jasper, Joanne Elizabeth Lauck, Randall Lockwood & Frank Ascione - 1997 - Ethics and Behavior 7:2.
     
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  4. Ordered to Care: The Dilemma of American Nursing, 1850-1945. Susan M. Reverby.Gail E. Farr - 1990 - Isis 81 (1):142-144.
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  5. Susan Haack a Complete Bibliography.Cornelis de Waal - 2007 - In Cornelis De Waal (ed.), Susan Haack: A Lady of Distinctions: The Philosopher Responds to Critics. Prometheus Books.
    In this volume comprised of sixteen essays and rebuttals, author and professor of philosophy Susan Haack responds to her fellow philosophers and her critics on a wide range of topics that involve much more than the esoteric nature of contemporary philosophy. Instead, as is Haack's forte, she asserts her views on important current issues such as how scientists conduct their work, the ethics of affirmative action and the pitfalls of preferential hiring, and how the distorted reality the postmodern thinkers (...)
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  6. On Susan Wolf’s “Good-for-Nothings".Ben Bramble - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (5):1071-1081.
    According to welfarism about value, something is good simpliciter just in case it is good for some being or beings. In her recent Presidential Address to the American Philosophical Association, “Good-For-Nothings”, Susan Wolf argues against welfarism by appeal to great works of art, literature, music, and philosophy. Wolf provides three main arguments against this view, which I call The Superfluity Argument, The Explanation of Benefit Argument, and The Welfarist’s Mistake. In this paper, I reconstruct these arguments and explain where, (...)
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  7.  24
    Impact of Social Stigma on the Process of Obtaining Informed Consent for Genetic Research on Podoconiosis: A Qualitative Study.Fasil Tekola, Susan Bull, Bobbie Farsides, Melanie J. Newport, Adebowale Adeyemo, Charles N. Rotimi & Gail Davey - 2009 - BMC Medical Ethics 10 (1):13-.
    BackgroundThe consent process for a genetic study is challenging when the research is conducted in a group stigmatized because of beliefs that the disease is familial. Podoconiosis, also known as 'mossy foot', is an example of such a disease. It is a condition resulting in swelling of the lower legs among people exposed to red clay soil. It is a very stigmatizing problem in endemic areas of Ethiopia because of the widely held opinion that the disease runs in families and (...)
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  8.  4
    Beneficence, Clinical Urgency, and the Return of Individual Research Results to Relatives.Stephanie M. Fullerton, Susan Brown Trinidad, Gail P. Jarvik & Wylie Burke - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (10):9-10.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 10, Page 9-10, October 2012.
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  9.  20
    Feminism and Postmodernism in Susan Frank Parsons. [REVIEW]E. Gudorf Christine - 2004 - Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (3):519 - 543.
    Reviewing "The Ethics of Gender, Feminism and Christian Ethics," and "The Cambridge Companion to Feminist Theology," the author suggests that Susan Parsons responds to questions postmodernism has posed to both feminism and Christian ethics by using insights gained from various accounts of the moral subject found in feminist philosophy, ethics, and theology. Hesitant to embrace postmodernism's critique of the possibility of ethics, Parsons redefines ethics by establishing a moral point of view within discursive communities. Yet in her brief treatment (...)
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  10.  6
    Tailoring Consent to Context: Designing an Appropriate Consent Process for a Biomedical Study in a Low Income Setting.Fasil Tekola, Susan J. Bull, Bobbie Farsides, Melanie J. Newport, Adebowale Adeyemo, Charles N. Rotimi & Gail Davey - unknown
    Background Currently there is increasing recognition of the need for research in developing countries where disease burden is high. Understanding the role of local factors is important for undertaking ethical research in developing countries. We explored factors relating to information and communication during the process of informed consent, and the approach that should be followed for gaining consent. The study was conducted prior to a family-based genetic study among people with podoconiosis (non-filarial elephantiasis) in southern Ethiopia. Methodology/Principal Findings We adapted (...)
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  11.  3
    Children's Reasoning About Physics Within and Across Ontological Kinds.Gail D. Heyman, Ann T. Phillips & Susan A. Gelman - 2003 - Cognition 89 (1):43-61.
  12. Hannah Arendt and Susan Griffin: Toward a Feminist Metahistory.Shari Stone-Mediatore - 2000 - In Cecile Tougas & Sara Ebenreck (eds.), Presenting Women Philosophers. Temple University Press.
    Efforts to introduce particular-focused and emotionally engaged storytelling into historiography have sparked intense debate. Stone-Mediatore argues that women and other under-represented groups have a particular interest in defending the epistemic value of storytelling, but that we can do so meaningfully -- not by endorsing all storytelling -- but only by articulating a metahistory that challenges the division between history and story as well as makes explicit the interrelated epistemic and ethical goals of historical inquiry. The author draws on Hannah Arendt (...)
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  13.  3
    The Challenge of Informed Consent and Return of Results in Translational Genomics: Empirical Analysis and Recommendations.Gail E. Henderson, Susan M. Wolf, Kristine J. Kuczynski, Steven Joffe, Richard R. Sharp, D. Williams Parsons, Bartha M. Knoppers, Joon-Ho Yu & Paul S. Appelbaum - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (3):344-355.
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  14.  10
    Universality Biases: How Theories About Human Nature Succeed.Gail A. Hornstein & Susan Leigh Star - 1990 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 20 (4):421-436.
    University of Keele, England This article analyzes the strategies and means by which universalist claims about human nature become successful in science. Of specific interest are the conditions under which claims of this sort are taken to be inherently superior to those which are particularistic or context-specific (a hierarchy of values which we term "universality bias"). We trace the birth of universalists claims in neglected fields, their growth through methodological agreements and the use of invisible referents, and their roots in (...)
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  15.  3
    The Challenge of Informed Consent and Return of Results in Translational Genomics: Empirical Analysis and Recommendations.Gail E. Henderson, Susan M. Wolf, Kristine J. Kuczynski, Steven Joffe, Richard R. Sharp, D. Williams Parsons, Bartha M. Knoppers, Joon‐Ho Yu & Paul S. Appelbaum - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 42 (3):344-355.
    As exome and genome sequencing move into clinical application, questions surround how to elicit consent and handle potential return of individual genomic results. This study analyzes nine consent forms used in NIH-funded sequencing studies. Content analysis reveals considerable heterogeneity, including in defining results that may be returned, identifying potential benefits and risks of return, protecting privacy, addressing placement of results in the medical record, and data-sharing. In response to lack of consensus, we offer recommendations.
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  16.  2
    Pre- and Postnatal Drivers of Childhood Intelligence: Evidence From Singapore.Gail Pacheco, Mary Hedges, Chris Schilling & Susan Morton - 2013 - Journal of Biosocial Science 45 (1):41-56.
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  17.  1
    Patients' Choices for Return of Exome Sequencing Results to Relatives in the Event of Their Death.Laura M. Amendola, Martha Horike‐Pyne, Susan B. Trinidad, Stephanie M. Fullerton, Barbara J. Evans, Wylie Burke & Gail P. Jarvik - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):476-485.
    The informed consent process for genetic testing does not commonly address preferences regarding disclosure of results in the event of the patient's death. Adults being tested for familial colorectal cancer were asked whether they want their exome sequencing results disclosed to another person in the event of their death prior to receiving the results. Of 78 participants, 92% designated an individual and 8% declined to. Further research will help refine practices for informed consent.
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  18. Preparing the Next Generation of Oral Historians: An Anthology of Oral History Education.Lisa Krissoff Boehm, Michael Brooks, Patrick W. Carlton, Fran Chadwick, Margaret Smith Crocco, Jennifer Braithwait Darrow, Toby Daspit, Joseph DeFilippo, Susan Douglass, David King Dunaway, Sandy Eades, The Foxfire Fund, Amy S. Green, Ronald J. Grele, M. Gail Hickey, Cliff Kuhn, Erin McCarthy, Marjorie L. McLellan, Susan Moon, Charles Morrissey, John A. Neuenschwander, Rich Nixon, Irma M. Olmedo, Sandy Polishuk, Alessandro Portelli, Kimberly K. Porter, Troy Reeves, Donald A. Ritchie, Marie Scatena, David Sidwell, Ronald Simon, Alan Stein, Debra Sutphen, Kathryn Walbert, Glenn Whitman, John D. Willard & Linda P. Wood - 2006 - Altamira Press.
    Preparing the Next Generation of Oral Historians is an invaluable resource to educators seeking to bring history alive for students at all levels. Filled with insightful reflections on teaching oral history, it offers practical suggestions for educators seeking to create curricula, engage students, gather community support, and meet educational standards. By the close of the book, readers will be able to successfully incorporate oral history projects in their own classrooms.
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  19. Analyzing the Different Voice: Feminist Psychological Theory and Literary Texts.Lyn Mikel Brown, Susan Currier, Sally L. Kitch, Kathleen Gregory Klein, Gail L. Mortimer, Annie G. Rogers, Betty Sasaki, Barbara Schapiro, Mirella Servodidio, Donna D. Simms & Susan Sulriman - 1998 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    These essays apply influential, pathbreaking psychological studies about women's lives to literature. In their analyses of fictional portraits, contributors both challenge and confirm psychological theories about female identity, about 'connection/separation' as developmental catalysts, and about the impact of gender on 'voice,' moral decision-making, and epistemology in relation to classical and contemporary literary texts, written by both women and men.
     
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  20. Arf6 and the 5'phosphatase of Synaptojanin 1 Regulate Autophagy in Cone Photoreceptors.Ashley A. George, Sara Hayden, Gail R. Stanton & Susan E. Brockerhoff - 2016 - Bioessays 38:S119-S135.
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  21.  80
    Luck and Equality: Susan Hurley.Susan Hurley - 2001 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75 (1):51–72.
    [ Susan Hurley] I argue that the aim to neutralize the influence of luck on distribution cannot provide a basis for egalitarianism: it can neither specify nor justify an egalitarian distribution. Luck and responsibility can play a role in determining what justice requires to be redistributed, but from this we cannot derive how to distribute: we cannot derive a pattern of distribution from the 'currency' of distributive justice. I argue that the contrary view faces a dilemma, according to whether (...)
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  22.  25
    Susan Wolf, The Variety of Values: Essays on Morality, Meaning, and Love. [REVIEW]Sara Protasi - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2015 (06.08).
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  23.  23
    Philosophy and Feminism: The Case of Susan Bordo.E. Bernick Susan - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (3):188 - 196.
    In this paper I lay out what I take to be the crucial insights in Susan Bordo's "Feminist Skepticism and the 'Maleness' of Philosophy" and point out some additional difficulties with the skeptical position. I call attention to an ambiguity in the nature or content of the "maleness" of philosophy that Bordo identifies. Finally, I point out that, unlike some feminist skeptics, Bordo never loses sight in her work of women's lived experiences.
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  24.  46
    Evidence and Inquiry by Susan Haack.James Cargile - 1996 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (3):621-625.
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  25.  15
    Philosophy of Logics By Susan Haack Cambridge University Press, 1978, Xvi + 276 Pp., £13.50. [REVIEW]Max Black - 1981 - Philosophy 56 (217):435-.
  26. Interview with Professor Gail Weiss.Gail Weiss, Luna Dolezal & Sheena Hyland - 2008 - Perspectives: International Postgraduate Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):3-8.
    An interview with Gail Weiss concerning her interests and influences, especially the body and embodiment.
     
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  27.  84
    Susan Stebbing, Incomplete Symbols and Foundherentist Meta-Ontology.Frederique Janssen-Lauret - 2017 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 5 (2):6-17.
    Susan Stebbing’s work on incomplete symbols and analysis was instrumental in clarifying, sharpening, and improving the project of logical constructions which was pivotal to early analytic philosophy. She dispelled use-mention confusions by restricting the term ‘incomplete symbol’ to expressions eliminable through analysis, rather than those expressions’ purported referents, and distinguished linguistic analysis from analysis of facts. In this paper I explore Stebbing’s role in analytic philosophy’s development from anti-holism, presupposing that analysis terminates in simples, to the more holist or (...)
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  28. Susan Stuart & Gordana Dodig Crnkovic : 'Computation, Information, Cognition: The Nexus and the Liminal'. [REVIEW]Vincent C. Müller - 2009 - Cybernetics and Human Knowing 16 (3-4):201-203.
    Review of: "Computation, Information, Cognition: The Nexus and the Liminal", Ed. Susan Stuart & Gordana Dodig Crnkovic, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, September 2007, xxiv+340pp, ISBN: 9781847180902, Hardback: £39.99, $79.99 ---- Are you a computer? Is your cat a computer? A single biological cell in your stomach, perhaps? And your desk? You do not think so? Well, the authors of this book suggest that you think again. They propose a computational turn, a turn towards computational explanation and towards the explanation (...)
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  29. Spinoza on Philosophy, Religion, and Politics, by Susan James (Review). [REVIEW]Eugene Marshall - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (2):318-319.
    Event synopsis: Professor Susan James inverses Leo Strauss’ reading of Spinoza. Whereas Strauss emphasized the hidden subtext of Spinoza’s arguments, James revives the explicit debates of his time within which Spinoza's Theologico-Political Treatise was situated. But this is not a simple historical reconstruction. James’ close reading of the Treatise offers a radically new perspective on Spinoza’s revolutionary book – a reading that presents startling new perspective on the political, metaphysical and theological implications of the book. Given the importance of (...)
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  30. Review of Susan Haack, Deviant Logic, Fuzzy Logic: Beyond the Formalism[REVIEW]Achille C. Varzi - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (3):468-471.
    Book information: Deviant Logic, Fuzzy Logic: Beyond The Formalism. By SUSAN HAACK. Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 1996. Pp. xxvi, 291.
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  31.  6
    I—Susan James: Creating Rational Understanding: Spinoza as a Social Epistemologist.Susan James - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):181-199.
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  32. Susan Stebbing's Criticism of Wittgenstein's Tractatus.Nikolay Milkov - 2003 - Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 10:351-63.
    Susan Stebbing’s paper “Logical Positivism and Analysis” (March 1933) was unusually critical of Wittgenstein. It put up a sharp opposition between Cambridge analytic philosophy of Moore and Russell and the positivist philosophy of the Vienna Circle to which she included Wittgenstein from 1929–32. Above all, positivists were interested in analyzing language, analytic philosophers in analyzing facts. Moreover, whereas analytic philosophers were engaged in directional analysis which seeks to illuminate the multiplicity of the analyzed facts, positivists aimed at final analysis (...)
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  33.  10
    Happiness and Meaning: Two Aspects of the Good Life: Susan Wolf.Susan Wolf - 1997 - Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (1):207-225.
    The topic of self-interest raises large and intractable philosophical questions–most obviously, the question “In what does self-interest consist?” The concept, as opposed to the content of self-interest, however, seems clear enough. Self-interest is interest in one's own good. To act self-interestedly is to act on the motive of advancing one's own good. Whether what one does actually is in one's self-interest depends on whether it actually does advance, or at least, minimize the decline of, one's own good. Though it may (...)
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  34.  7
    The Possibility of Inquiry: Meno’s Paradox From Socrates to Sextus, by Gail Fine.David Bronstein - 2017 - Mind 126 (502):631-634.
    The Possibility of Inquiry: Meno’s Paradox from Socrates to Sextus, by Gail Fine. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. Pp. xiv + 399.
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  35. A Short Review of Consciousness in Action by Susan Hurley.Axel Cleeremans & Erik Myin - 1999 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 3:455-458.
    Consider Susan Hurley's depiction of mainstream views of the mind: "The mind is a kind of sandwich, and cognition is the filling" (p. 401). This particular sandwich (with perception as the bottom loaf and action as the top loaf) tastes foul to Hurley, who devotes most of "Consciousness in Action" to a systematic and sometimes extraordinarily detailed critique of what has otherwise been dubbed "classical" models of the mind. This critique then provides the basis for her alternative proposal, in (...)
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  36.  86
    Susan Wolf, Meaning in Life and Why It Matters.Simon Derpmann - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):421-422.
    Susan Wolf, Meaning in Life and Why it Matters Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s10677-011-9321-8 Authors Simon Derpmann, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Philosophisches Seminar, Domplatz 23, 48143 Münster, Germany Journal Ethical Theory and Moral Practice Online ISSN 1572-8447 Print ISSN 1386-2820.
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  37.  15
    "Dynamical, Ecological Sub-Persons" Commentary on Susan HurleyÂ's Consciousness in Action.Anthony Chemero & William Cordeiro - unknown
    In a way that is rarely even attempted, and even more rarely actually pulled off, Susan Hurley, in her book Consciousness in Action, brings scientific ideas into contact with mainstream philosophy. It is not at all unusual for empirical results from cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience to be raised in discussion of issues in philosophy of science and philosophy of mind--Dennett and the Churchlands, for example, have been doing so for years. But Hurley attempts to draw empirical results even (...)
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  38.  3
    The Possibility of Inquiry: Meno's Paradox From Socrates to Sextus by Gail Fine.David Ebrey - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):537-538.
    In the first half of this book, Gail Fine provides a renewed defense of her reading of Meno's famous paradox; in the second, she provides novel accounts of how Aristotle, the Stoics, the Epicureans, and Sextus Empiricus responded to the paradox. For reasons of space, I focus on the first half, where Fine defends the same basic account of Meno's paradox she put forward in her influential "Inquiry in the Meno". The book goes further, considering and dismissing several alternatives (...)
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  39.  13
    C. I. Lewis: Susan Haack.Susan Haack - 1985 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 19:215-238.
    Lewis, according to Kuklick, was ‘a private person’, of ‘unsparing honesty and … utter dedication to the rational pursuit of truth’. He was, Kuklick continues, ‘equally uncompromising in what he expected of his readers, and as a result wrote for and lectured to a tiny group of scholars’. I hope that—since I occasionally find myself borrowing from him and frequently find myself arguing with him—I may count myself as one of the ‘tiny group of scholars’ for whom Lewis wrote. And (...)
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  40.  75
    Is Consciousness Epiphenomenal? Comment on Susan Pockett.Gilberto Gomes - 2005 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (12):77-79.
    In a provocative article published in the Journal of Consciousness Studies, Susan Pockett argues for the plausibility of considering consciousness as an epiphenomenon of neural activity. This means that consciousness, though caused by the brain, would not in its turn have any role in the causation of neural activity and, consequently, of behaviour. Critical for her argument is the distinction she makes between 'consciousness per se' and 'the neural processing that accompanies it' . In her discussion, though, the author (...)
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  41.  28
    The ‘New Science of Memetics’: The Case for Susan Blackmore.Susuan Blackmore - 2003 - Think 2 (5):21.
    In this article and the following one, Susan Blackmore and Michael Bradie take contrary positions on the ‘science of memetics’, an approach to explaining human behaviour and culture based on the idea that our minds and cultures are in large part determined by self-replicating gene-like entities called ‘memes’. Memes would seem to allow the application of evolutionary ideas to both biology and culture. Many find that thought exciting and appealing. Others consider it arrogant and scientistic. Who is right?
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  42.  58
    Review: Susan Haack, Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate, Unfashionable Essays. [REVIEW]H. G. Callaway - 2000 - Erkenntnis 53 (3):407-414.
    Susan Haack presents a striking and appealing figure in contemporary Anglo-American philosophy. In spite of British birth and education, she appears to bridge the gap between analytic philosophy and American pragmatism, with its more diverse influences and sources. Well known for her writings in the philosophy of logic and epistemology, she fuses something of the hard-headed debunking style of a Bertrand Russell with a lively interest in Peirce, James and Dewey.
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  43.  19
    Between the Philosophy of Religion and Cultural History: Susan Taubes on the Birth of Tragedy and the Negative Theology of Modernity.Sigrid Weigel - 2010 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (150):115-135.
    The caesura of tragedy, more precisely tragedy as the scene of a caesura upon which an interruption occurs in the relation between divine grounds and human will, stands at the center of Susan Taubes's confrontation with tragedy. Moving beyond an explication of generic history, she analyzed the “Nature of Tragedy” (1953) as a phenomenon emerging from a cultural-historical threshold situation, illuminating tragedy's origins in the framework of her approach to ritual, religion, and philosophy. In respect to the history of (...)
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  44.  20
    Kites, Models and Logic: Susan Sterrett Investigates Models in Wittgenstein's World.Susan G. Sterrett - 2008/9 - Interview About Book for SimplyCharly.Com.
    This is the text of Dr. Sterrett's replies to an interviewer's questions for simplycharly.com, a website with interviews by academics on various authors, philosophers, and scientists.
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  45. "Justifying Toleration", Ed. Susan Mendus. [REVIEW]Susan James - 1989 - Ratio 2 (2):196.
     
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  46.  18
    A Stragegy of Containment: Center and Margin in Desperately Seeking Susan.Mas'ud Zavarzadeh - 1985 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1985 (65):136-143.
    In her film, Desperately Seeking Susan, Susan Seidelman continues her inquiry into the relations between the “center” and the “margin” in contemporary culture. The ideology of the film represents the center — the status quo — as the site for mature negotiations of communal values, whereas it constructs the margin — the locus of opposition — as an instance of self-indulgence, transgression, and extremity. This is the same theme in her first film, Smithereens. This fascination with the tension (...)
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  47.  16
    Letter From Susan Taubes to Jacob Taubes April 4, 1952.Christina Pareigis - 2010 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (150):111-114.
    Foreword This letter is part of a correspondence belonging to the estate of Susan Taubes. It documents the private and intellectual relations between her and Jacob Taubes, whom she married in 1949. The two spent most of the period until 1952 geographically separated from each other, a situation due to their changing work and study circumstances. Susan spent the first half of 1952 in Paris, preparing her dissertation at the Sorbonne; Jacob took up Gershom Scholem's invitation to teach (...)
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  48.  11
    Women and Language in Susan Griffin's Woman and Nature: The Roaring Inside Her.Carol H. Cantrell - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (3):225-238.
    In Woman and Nature: The Roaring Inside Her, Susan Griffin's embedding of language and culture within the natural world implicitly offers a critique of widespread assumptions, shared by many feminists, that language belongs only to the powerful and that it is inherently violent. Griffin's depiction of the process through which women come to speech is illuminated by V. N. Vološinov's work on the multiaccentuality of language and by Trinh Minh-ha's characterizations of oral traditions. Both authors stress the constant re-creation (...)
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  49.  15
    Searching for the Absent God: Susan Taubes's Negative Theology.Christina Pareigis - 2010 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2010 (150):97-110.
    “I love you dear child and it is very hard to be reduced to a reines Bewusstsein [pure consciousness].”1 Susan Taubes wrote this sentence in Paris on February 18, 1952, to her husband Jacob Taubes in Jerusalem. Following ten months together with him in the holy city, she had been living for six weeks in one of the most prominent centers of secular modernism. From now on she would live alone. Her arrival in Paris formed the sequel to an (...)
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  50.  10
    The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association Ed. By Susan Ball (Review).Ross K. Elfline - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (4):110-115.
    For many of us, our relationship with the College Art Association (CAA) centers around the organization's annual meeting, that cacophonous yearly ritual that sees job applicants, panelists, and old friends and colleagues descend upon a convention hotel for one long weekend in February. The recent publication The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association, edited by former CAA executive director Susan Ball, attempts to historicize not only this event but the entire range of the (...)
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