Results for 'Susan Gunasti'

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  1. Mona Hassan, Longing for the Lost Caliphate: A Transregional History. [REVIEW]Susan Gunasti - 2018 - Critical Research on Religion 6 (1):101-103.
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  2. I—Susan James: Creating Rational Understanding: Spinoza as a Social Epistemologist.Susan James - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):181-199.
    Does Spinoza present philosophy as the preserve of an elite, while condemning the uneducated to a false though palliative form of ‘true religion’? Some commentators have thought so, but this contribution aims to show that they are mistaken. The form of religious life that Spinoza recommends creates the political and epistemological conditions for a gradual transition to philosophical understanding, so that true religion and philosophy are in practice inseparable.
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  3. Luck and Equality: Susan Hurley.Susan Hurley - 2001 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75 (1):51–72.
    [ Susan Hurley] I argue that the aim to neutralize the influence of luck on distribution cannot provide a basis for egalitarianism: it can neither specify nor justify an egalitarian distribution. Luck and responsibility can play a role in determining what justice requires to be redistributed, but from this we cannot derive how to distribute: we cannot derive a pattern of distribution from the 'currency' of distributive justice. I argue that the contrary view faces a dilemma, according to whether (...)
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  4.  18
    Susan Dodds' Reply.Susan Dodds - 2002 - Monash Bioethics Review 21 (3):S43-S48.
    In Australia, Human Research Ethics Committees have a vital role to play—as the primary institutional mechanism for ethical review of research—in protecting research participants, and promoting ethical research. Their ability to act effectively in this role is currently threatened by the limited support they receive and their burgeoning workloads. In this discussion paper, I trace some of the factors contributing to what I describe as a resource crisis in human research ethics. I suggest a review of the working of HRECs (...)
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  5.  22
    Susan," Local, Global, Regional: Women's Studies in Australia".Susan& Sheridan Magarey - 2002 - Feminist Studies 28:1.
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  6.  34
    XIII. Passion and Politics1: Susan James.Susan James - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:221-234.
    The sudden resurgence of interest in the emotions that has recently overtaken analytical philosophy has raised a range of questions about the place of the passions in established explanatory schemes. How, for example, do the emotions fit into theories of action organized around beliefs and desires? How can they be included in analyses of the mind developed to account for other mental states and capacities? Questions of this general form also arise within political philosophy, and the wish to acknowledge their (...)
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  7. Political Patronage and the Writing of Qurrhringan Commentaries Among the Ottoman Turks.S. Gunasti - 2013 - Journal of Islamic Studies 24 (3):335-357.
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  8.  85
    Speech, Harm, and the Mind-Body Problem in First Amendment Jurisprudence: Susan J. Brison.Susan J. Brison - 1998 - Legal Theory 4 (1):39-61.
    “Sucks and stones will break my bones,” Justice Scalia pronounced from the bench in oral arguments in Schenck v. Pro-Choice Network, “but words can never hurt me. That's the First Amendment,” he added. Jay Alan Sekulow, the lawyer for the petitioners, anti-abortion protesters who had been enjoined from moving closer than fifteen feet away from those entering an abortion facility, was obviously pleased by this characterization of the right to free speech, replying, “That's certainly our position on it, and that (...)
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  9. Freedom Within Reason.Susan Wolf - 1990 - Oup Usa.
    In Freedom Within Reason, Susan Wolf charts a course between incompatibilism, or the notion that freedom and responsibility require causal and metaphysical independence from the impersonal forces of nature, and compatibilism, or the notion that people are free and responsible as long as their actions are governed by their desires. Wolf argues that some of the forces which are beyond our control are friends to freedom rather than enemies of it, enabling us to see the world for what it (...)
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  10.  16
    Luck And Equality: Susan Hurley.Susan Hurley - 2001 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 75 (1):51-72.
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  11. Meaning in Life and Why It Matters (Markus Rüther).Susan Wolf - 2011 - Philosophischer Literaturanzeiger 64 (3):308.
    Most people, including philosophers, tend to classify human motives as falling into one of two categories: the egoistic or the altruistic, the self-interested or the moral. According to Susan Wolf, however, much of what motivates us does not comfortably fit into this scheme. Often we act neither for our own sake nor out of duty or an impersonal concern for the world. Rather, we act out of love for objects that we rightly perceive as worthy of love--and it is (...)
     
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  12. Meaning in Life and Why It Matters.Susan Wolf - 2010 - Princeton University Press.
    Most people, including philosophers, tend to classify human motives as falling into one of two categories: the egoistic or the altruistic, the self-interested or the moral. According to Susan Wolf, however, much of what motivates us does not comfortably fit into this scheme. Often we act neither for our own sake nor out of duty or an impersonal concern for the world. Rather, we act out of love for objects that we rightly perceive as worthy of love--and it is (...)
     
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  13. Moral Saints.Susan Wolf - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (8):419-439.
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  14. Book Review: Susan Gubar, Rooms of Our Own. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2006. 236 Pp. ISBN 0—252—07379—7, £11.99. [REVIEW]Susan Sheridan - 2009 - Feminist Theory 10 (1):138-140.
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  15. Kites, Models and Logic: Susan Sterrett Investigates Models in Wittgenstein's World.Susan G. Sterrett - 2008/9 - Interview About Book for SimplyCharly.Com.
    This is the text of Dr. Sterrett's replies to an interviewer's questions for simplycharly.com, a website with interviews by academics on various authors, philosophers, and scientists.
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  16. Letter From Susan Taubes to Jacob Taubes, April 4, 1952.Susan Taubes - 2010 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 150.
     
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  17.  58
    Philosophy and Feminism: The Case of Susan Bordo.Susan E. Bernick - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (3):188 - 196.
    In this paper I lay out what I take to be the crucial insights in Susan Bordo's "Feminist Skepticism and the 'Maleness' of Philosophy" and point out some additional difficulties with the skeptical position. I call attention to an ambiguity in the nature or content of the "maleness" of philosophy that Bordo identifies. Finally, I point out that, unlike some feminist skeptics, Bordo never loses sight in her work of women's lived experiences.
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  18. No Longer Patient: Feminist Ethics and Health Care.Susan Sherwin - 1992 - Temple University Press.
    Her careful building of positions, her unique approaches to analyzing problems, and her excellent insights make this an important work for feminists, those ...
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  19. The Variety of Values: Essays on Morality, Meaning, and Love.Susan Wolf - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    For over thirty years Susan Wolf has been writing about moral and nonmoral values and the relation between them. This volume collects Wolf's most important essays on the topics of morality, love, and meaning, ranging from her classic essay "Moral Saints" to her most recent "The Importance of Love.".
     
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  20. The Rejected Body: Feminist Philosophical Reflections on Disability.Susan Wendell - 1996 - Routledge.
    The Rejected Body argues that feminist theorizing has been skewed toward non-disabled experience, and that the knowledge of people with disabilities must be integrated into feminist ethics, discussions of bodily life, and criticism of the cognitive and social authority of medicine. Among the topics it addresses are who should be identified as disabled; whether disability is biomedical, social or both; what causes disability and what could 'cure' it; and whether scientific efforts to eliminate disabling physical conditions are morally justified. Wendell (...)
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  21. Sanity and the Metaphysics of Responsibility.Susan Wolf - 1987 - In Ferdinand David Schoeman (ed.), Responsibility, Character, and the Emotions: New Essays in Moral Psychology. Cambridge University Press. pp. 46-62.
    My strategy is to examine a recent trend in philosophical discussions of responsibility, a trend that tries, but I think ultimately fails, to give an acceptable analysis of the conditions of responsibility. It fails due to what at first appear to be deep and irresolvable metaphysical problems. It is here that I suggest that the condition of sanity comes to the rescue. What at first appears to be an impossible requirement for responsibility---the requirement that the responsible agent have created her- (...)
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  22.  80
    Book Review:Feminist Politics and and Human Nature. Alison M. Jaggar. [REVIEW]Susan Moller Okin - 1985 - Ethics 95 (2):354-.
  23.  15
    Get Lost: On the Intersection of Environmental and Intellectual History: Susan Schulten.Susan Schulten - 2008 - Modern Intellectual History 5 (1):141-152.
    I finished The Humboldt Current at noon on a glorious spring day in northern California. Sachs concludes with a call to follow the work of Alexander von Humboldt: get lost in nature, allow it to overtake you even in everyday life. So I set off from my in-laws' home in the hills of the East Bay, and made my way to the local park nestled at the top of a ridge. Just as I have for the last ten years, I (...)
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  24. Happiness and Meaning: Two Aspects of the Good Life.Susan Wolf - 1997 - Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (1):207.
    The topic of self-interest raises large and intractable philosophical questions–most obviously, the question “In what does self-interest consist?” The concept, as opposed to the content of self-interest, however, seems clear enough. Self-interest is interest in one's own good. To act self-interestedly is to act on the motive of advancing one's own good. Whether what one does actually is in one's self-interest depends on whether it actually does advance, or at least, minimize the decline of, one's own good. Though it may (...)
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  25.  55
    Managing Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: Analysis and Recommendations.Susan M. Wolf, Frances P. Lawrenz, Charles A. Nelson, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Mildred K. Cho, Ellen Wright Clayton, Joel G. Fletcher, Michael K. Georgieff, Dale Hammerschmidt, Kathy Hudson, Judy Illes, Vivek Kapur, Moira A. Keane, Barbara A. Koenig, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Elizabeth G. McFarland, Jordan Paradise, Lisa S. Parker, Sharon F. Terry, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):219-248.
    No consensus yet exists on how to handle incidental fnd-ings in human subjects research. Yet empirical studies document IFs in a wide range of research studies, where IFs are fndings beyond the aims of the study that are of potential health or reproductive importance to the individual research participant. This paper reports recommendations of a two-year project group funded by NIH to study how to manage IFs in genetic and genomic research, as well as imaging research. We conclude that researchers (...)
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  26.  79
    Conceptual Differences Between Children and Adults.Susan Carey - 1988 - Mind and Language 3 (3):167-181.
  27.  4
    Stucturing Events.Susan Rothstein - 2004 - Blackwell.
    Throughout, the emerging theory of aspect is extensively compared with alternative theories, and the book concludes with general reflections on the semantic ...
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  28.  31
    An Ethical Approach to Practitioner Research: Dealing with Issues and Dilemmas in Action Research ‐ Edited by Anne Campbell and Susan Groundwater‐Smith.Susan Rodriques - 2009 - British Journal of Educational Studies 57 (4):448-449.
  29.  29
    No Longer Patient: Feminist Ethics and Health Care Susan Sherwin Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1992, Xi + 286 Pp., US$39.95. [REVIEW]Susan Wendell - 1994 - Dialogue 33 (4):783-.
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  30.  16
    ‘Irresistible Impulse’ and Moral Responsibility1: Susan Khin Zaw.Susan Khin Zaw - 1977 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 11:99-134.
    Should the insane and the mentally ill be held morally responsible for their actions? To answer ‘No’ to this question is to classify the mentally abnormal as not fully human: and indeed legal tradition has generally oscillated between assimilating the insane to brutes and assimilating them to children below the age of discretion, neither of these two categories being accountable in law for what they do. In what respect relevant to moral responsibility were the insane held to resemble brutes and (...)
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  31.  19
    Morality, Survival and Nuclear War: Susan Khin Zaw.Susan Khin Zaw - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 17:171-194.
    This paper proceeds from a sense of dissatisfaction with much of current moral argument about defence policy, in particular the role of nuclear weapons. Discussions of the moral issues tend to divide into two distinct kinds of writing: on the one hand, impassioned calls to action based on and allied with equally impassioned moral exhortations; and on the other hand, usually in academic contexts, meticulous analyses and comparisons of aspects of nuclear policy with paradigm cases of acknowledged moral categories or (...)
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  32.  37
    C. I. Lewis: Susan Haack.Susan Haack - 1985 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 19:215-238.
    Lewis, according to Kuklick, was ‘a private person’, of ‘unsparing honesty and … utter dedication to the rational pursuit of truth’. He was, Kuklick continues, ‘equally uncompromising in what he expected of his readers, and as a result wrote for and lectured to a tiny group of scholars’. I hope that—since I occasionally find myself borrowing from him and frequently find myself arguing with him—I may count myself as one of the ‘tiny group of scholars’ for whom Lewis wrote. And (...)
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  33. "Justifying Toleration", Ed. Susan Mendus. [REVIEW]Susan James - 1989 - Ratio 2 (2):196.
  34.  51
    Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate.Susan Haack - 1998 - University of Chicago Press.
    Forthright and wryly humorous, philosopher Susan Haack deploys her penetrating analytic skills on some of the most highly charged cultural and social debates of recent years. Relativism, multiculturalism, feminism, affirmative action, pragmatisms old and new, science, literature, the future of the academy and of philosophy itself—all come under her keen scrutiny in Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate.
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  35. Asymmetrical Freedom.Susan Wolf - 1980 - Journal of Philosophy 77 (March):151-66.
  36. Good-for-Nothings.Susan Wolf - 2010 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 85 (2):47-64.
    Many academic works as well as many works of art are such that if they had never been produced, no one would be worse off. Yet it is hard to resist the judgment that some such works are good nonetheless. We are rightly grateful that these works were created; we rightly admire them, appreciate them, and take pains to preserve them. And the authors and artists who produced them have reason to be proud. This should lead us to question the (...)
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  37.  90
    Happiness and Meaning: Two Aspects of the Good Life.Susan Wolf - 1997 - Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (1):207-225.
    The topic of self-interest raises large and intractable philosophical questions–most obviously, the question “In what does self-interest consist?” The concept, as opposed to the content of self-interest, however, seems clear enough. Self-interest is interest in one's own good. To act self-interestedly is to act on the motive of advancing one's own good. Whether what one does actually is in one's self-interest depends on whether it actually does advance, or at least, minimize the decline of, one's own good. Though it may (...)
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  38.  28
    Regarding the Pain of Others.Susan Sontag - 2003 - Diogène 201 (1):127-.
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  39.  39
    A Tapestry: Susan Edwards-McKie Interviews Professor Dr B. F. McGuinness on the Occasion of His 90th Birthday.Susan Edwards-McKie & Brian McGuinness - 2017 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 6 (2):85-90.
    Susan Edwards-McKie interviews Professor Dr B. F. McGuinness on the occasion of his 90th birthday.
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  40.  29
    The Language of Thought: A New Philosophical Direction.Susan Schneider - 2011 - MIT Press.
    A philosophical refashioning of the Language of Thought approach and the related computational theory of mind.
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  41. The Importance of Free Will.Susan Wolf - 1981 - Mind 90 (February):366-78.
  42. Meaningfulness: A Third Dimension of the Good Life.Susan Wolf - 2016 - Foundations of Science 21 (2):253-269.
    This paper argues that an adequate conception of a good life should recognize, in addition to happiness and morality, a third dimension of meaningfulness. It further proposes that we understand meaningfulness as involving both a subjective and an objective condition, suitably linked. Meaning arises when subjective attraction meets objective attractiveness. In other words one’s life is meaningful insofar as one is gripped or excited by things worthy of one’s love, and one is able to do something positive about it. The (...)
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  43. Moral Psychology and the Unity of the Virtues.Susan Wolf - 2007 - Ratio 20 (2):145–167.
    The ancient Greeks subscribed to the thesis of the Unity of Virtue, according to which the possession of one virtue is closely related to the possession of all the others. Yet empirical observation seems to contradict this thesis at every turn. What could the Greeks have been thinking of? The paper offers an interpretation and a tentative defence of a qualified version of the thesis. It argues that, as the Greeks recognized, virtue essentially involves knowledge ? specifically, evaluative knowledge of (...)
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  44.  59
    Dutch Book Arguments.Susan Vineberg - 2011 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  45. On Susan Wolf’s “Good-for-Nothings".Ben Bramble - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (5):1071-1081.
    According to welfarism about value, something is good simpliciter just in case it is good for some being or beings. In her recent Presidential Address to the American Philosophical Association, “Good-For-Nothings”, Susan Wolf argues against welfarism by appeal to great works of art, literature, music, and philosophy. Wolf provides three main arguments against this view, which I call The Superfluity Argument, The Explanation of Benefit Argument, and The Welfarist’s Mistake. In this paper, I reconstruct these arguments and explain where, (...)
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  46. The Linguistic Analogy: Motivations, Results, and Speculations.Susan Dwyer, Bryce Huebner & Marc D. Hauser - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):486-510.
    Inspired by the success of generative linguistics and transformational grammar, proponents of the linguistic analogy (LA) in moral psychology hypothesize that careful attention to folk-moral judgments is likely to reveal a small set of implicit rules and structures responsible for the ubiquitous and apparently unbounded capacity for making moral judgments. As a theoretical hypothesis, LA thus requires a rich description of the computational structures that underlie mature moral judgments, an account of the acquisition and development of these structures, and an (...)
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  47. Physically Similar Systems: A History of the Concept.Susan G. Sterrett - 2017 - In Lorenzo Magnani & Tommaso Wayne Bertolotti (eds.), Springer Handbook of Model-Based Science. Dordrecht Heidelberg London New York: Springer. pp. 377-412.
    The concept of similar systems arose in physics, and appears to have originated with Newton in the seventeenth century. This chapter provides a critical history of the concept of physically similar systems, the twentieth century concept into which it developed. The concept was used in the nineteenth century in various fields of engineering, theoretical physics and theoretical and experimental hydrodynamics. In 1914, it was articulated in terms of ideas developed in the eighteenth century and used in nineteenth century mathematics and (...)
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  48.  39
    Feminism & Bioethics: Beyond Reproduction.Susan M. Wolf (ed.) - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    Bioethics has paid surprisingly little attention to the special problems faced by women and to feminist analyses of current health care issues other than ...
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  49. Morality and Partiality.Susan Wolf - 1992 - Philosophical Perspectives 6:243-259.
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  50. Toward a Feminist Theory of Disability.Susan Wendell - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (2):104 - 124.
    We need a feminist theory of disability, both because 16 percent of women are disabled, and because the oppression of disabled people is closely linked to the cultural oppression of the body. Disability is not a biological given; like gender, it is socially constructed from biologically reality. Our culture idealizes the body and demands that we control it. Thus, although most people will be disabled at some time in their lives, the disabled are made "the other," who symbolize failure of (...)
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