Results for 'Susan Hamilton'

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Profile: Susan Mary Hamilton (Swinburne University of Technology)
  1. Nineteenth-Century British Women's Education, 1840–1900.Susan Hamilton & Janice Schroeder (eds.) - 2007 - Routledge.
    This new six-volume collection from Routledge and Edition Synapse brings together key documents from the Victorian feminist campaign to establish and improve girls’ and women’s education. The set is divided into two sections, both of which incorporate materials that argue for the improvement of girls’ and women’s education as well as arguments made against education for girls and women. The first section focuses on the debate surrounding the quality of women’s education and the question of access to higher education for (...)
     
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  2. Cultural Economics and Theory: The Evolutionary Economics of David Hamilton.David Hamilton, Glen Atkinson, William M. Dugger & William T. Waller Jr (eds.) - 2009 - Routledge.
    David Hamilton is a leader in the American institutionalist school of heterodox economics that emerged after WWII. This volume includes 25 articles written by Hamilton over a period of nearly half a century. In these articles he examines the philosophical foundations and practical problems of economics. The result of this is a unique institutionalist view of how economies evolve and how economics itself has evolved with them. Hamilton applies insight gained from his study of culture to send (...)
     
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  3.  1
    Gavin Hamilton's Letters to Charles Townley.G. J. Hamilton & A. H. Smith - 1901 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 21:306.
  4. Review of the Work of Mr John Stuart Mill, Entitled, 'Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy'. [REVIEW]George Grote, John Stuart Mill & William Hamilton - 1868 - Trübner.
     
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  5. Canada. Art Gallery of Hamilton.Ontario Hamilton - 2000 - In Mike Crang & N. J. Thrift (eds.), Thinking Space. Routledge.
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  6. Human Needs and Political Judgment Lawrence Hamilton.Lawrence Hamilton - 2009 - In Boudewijn Paul de Bruin & Christopher F. Zurn (eds.), New Waves in Political Philosophy. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 40.
     
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  7. Hamilton Versus Mill a Thorough Discussion of Each Chapter in Mr. John S. Mill`s Examination of Hamilton`s Logic and Philosophy Beginning with the Logic''.William Hamilton & John Stuart Mill - 1866 - Maclachan & Stewart.
     
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  8. The Works of Alexander Hamilton: Comprising His Most Important Official Reports; An Improved Edition of the Federalist, on the New Constitution, Written in 1788; And Pacificus, on the Proclamation of Neutrality, Written in 1793.Alexander Hamilton - 1971 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 4 (3):178-180.
     
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  9. Microcosmus, an Essay Concerning Man and His Relation to the World, Tr. By E. Hamilton and E.E.C. Jones.Rudolf Hermann Lotze & Elizabeth Hamilton - 1885
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  10. Philosophical Works, with Notes and Supplementary Dissertations by Sir William Hamilton. With an Introd. By Harry M. Bracken. [REVIEW]Thomas Reid & William Hamilton - 1967 - G. Olms Verlagsbuchhandlung.
     
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  11. Reid's Essays on the Intellectual Powers of Man, From His Collected Writings by Sir W. Hamilton, and with the Foot-Notes of the Editor.Thomas Reid & William Hamilton - 1853
     
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  12. The Collected Works of Dugald Stewart, Ed. By Sir W. Hamilton, [Concluded by J. Veitch].Dugald Stewart, William Hamilton & John Veitch - 1854
     
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  13. Hamilton's Rule and Its Discontents.Jonathan Birch - 2014 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 65 (2):381-411.
    In an incendiary 2010 Nature article, M. A. Nowak, C. E. Tarnita, and E. O. Wilson present a savage critique of the best-known and most widely used framework for the study of social evolution, W. D. Hamilton’s theory of kin selection. More than a hundred biologists have since rallied to the theory’s defence, but Nowak et al. maintain that their arguments ‘stand unrefuted’. Here I consider the most contentious claim Nowak et al. defend: that Hamilton’s rule, the core (...)
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  14. Susan Haack a Complete Bibliography.Cornelis de Waal - 2007 - In Cornelis De Waal (ed.), Susan Haack: A Lady of Distinctions: The Philosopher Responds to Critics. Prometheus Books.
    In this volume comprised of sixteen essays and rebuttals, author and professor of philosophy Susan Haack responds to her fellow philosophers and her critics on a wide range of topics that involve much more than the esoteric nature of contemporary philosophy. Instead, as is Haack's forte, she asserts her views on important current issues such as how scientists conduct their work, the ethics of affirmative action and the pitfalls of preferential hiring, and how the distorted reality the postmodern thinkers (...)
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  15. On Susan Wolf’s “Good-for-Nothings".Ben Bramble - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (5):1071-1081.
    According to welfarism about value, something is good simpliciter just in case it is good for some being or beings. In her recent Presidential Address to the American Philosophical Association, “Good-For-Nothings”, Susan Wolf argues against welfarism by appeal to great works of art, literature, music, and philosophy. Wolf provides three main arguments against this view, which I call The Superfluity Argument, The Explanation of Benefit Argument, and The Welfarist’s Mistake. In this paper, I reconstruct these arguments and explain where, (...)
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  16.  2
    Hamilton’s Principle and Dispositional Essentialism: Friends or Foes?Vassilis Livanios - forthcoming - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie:1-13.
    Most recently Smart and Thébault revived an almost forgotten debate between Katzav and Ellis on the compatibility of Hamilton’s Principle with Dispositional Essentialism. Katzav’s arguments inter alia aim to show that HP presupposes a kind of metaphysical contingency which is at odds with the basic tenets of DE, and offers explanations of a different type and direction from those given by DE. In this paper I argue that though dispositional essentialists might adequately respond to these arguments, the question about (...)
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  17.  19
    Feminism and Postmodernism in Susan Frank Parsons. [REVIEW]E. Gudorf Christine - 2004 - Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (3):519 - 543.
    Reviewing "The Ethics of Gender, Feminism and Christian Ethics," and "The Cambridge Companion to Feminist Theology," the author suggests that Susan Parsons responds to questions postmodernism has posed to both feminism and Christian ethics by using insights gained from various accounts of the moral subject found in feminist philosophy, ethics, and theology. Hesitant to embrace postmodernism's critique of the possibility of ethics, Parsons redefines ethics by establishing a moral point of view within discursive communities. Yet in her brief treatment (...)
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  18.  38
    Tensor Lagrangians, Lagrangians Equivalent to the Hamilton-Jacobi Equation and Relativistic Dynamics.Alexander Gersten - 2011 - Foundations of Physics 41 (1):88-98.
    We deal with Lagrangians which are not the standard scalar ones. We present a short review of tensor Lagrangians, which generate massless free fields and the Dirac field, as well as vector and pseudovector Lagrangians for the electric and magnetic fields of Maxwell’s equations with sources. We introduce and analyse Lagrangians which are equivalent to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation and recast them to relativistic equations.
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  19.  35
    Hamilton and the Law of Varying Action Revisited.C. D. Bailey - 2004 - Foundations of Physics 34 (9):1385-1406.
    According to history texts, philosophers searched for a unifying natural law whereby natural phenomena and numbers are related. More than 2300 years ago, Aristotle postulated that nature requires minimum energy. More than 220 years ago, Euler applied the minimum energy postulate. More than 200 years ago, Lagrange provided a mathematical “proof” of the postulate for conservative systems. The resulting Principle of Least Action served only to derive the differential equations of motion of a conservative system. Then, 170 years ago, (...) presented what he claimed to be a “general method in dynamics.” Hamilton's resulting “Law of Varying Action” was supposed to apply to both conservative and non-conservative systems and was supposed to yield either the differential equations of motion or the integrals of those differential equations. However, no direct evaluation of the integrals of motion ever resulted from Hamilton's law of varying action. In 1975, a scant 29 years ago, following five years of controversy with engineer mechanicians, Dr. Wolfgang Yourgrau, Editor, Foundations of Physics, published my first paper based on Aristotle's postulate, without mathematical proof. That and subsequent papers present, through applications, a true “general method in dynamics.” In this essay, I present the mathematical proof that is missing from my 1975 and subsequent papers. Six fundamental integrals of analytical mechanics are derived from Aristotle's postulate. First, however, Hamilton must be revisited to show why his H function and his “force function” prevents the law of varying action from being the general method in dynamics that he claimed it to be. I have found that Hamilton’s Law of Varying Action (HLVA), as Hamilton presented it, cannot be applied to systems for which the force function is non-integrable. In 1972, Dr. B.E. Gatewood and Dr. D.P. Beres (then a graduate student) discovered that the end-point term associated with the principle of least action does not vanish. I named the new equation, “the general energy equation.” In 1973, because I was doing with it what Hamilton claimed could be done with HLVA, I simply assumed that this new equation was HLVA. I gave the new equation the misnomer HLVA. In 2001, I learned that I had made a grave mistake. I found that HLVA is at most a special case of the general energy equation. My interpretation of Aristotle's postulate permits one to by-pass the differential equations of motion completely for both conservative and non-conservative systems (no calculus of variations). (shrink)
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  20. Hannah Arendt and Susan Griffin: Toward a Feminist Metahistory.Shari Stone-Mediatore - 2000 - In Cecile Tougas & Sara Ebenreck (eds.), Presenting Women Philosophers. Temple University Press.
    Efforts to introduce particular-focused and emotionally engaged storytelling into historiography have sparked intense debate. Stone-Mediatore argues that women and other under-represented groups have a particular interest in defending the epistemic value of storytelling, but that we can do so meaningfully -- not by endorsing all storytelling -- but only by articulating a metahistory that challenges the division between history and story as well as makes explicit the interrelated epistemic and ethical goals of historical inquiry. The author draws on Hannah Arendt (...)
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  21.  15
    The Homogeneous Hamilton–Jacobi and Bernoulli Equations Revisited.Philippe Choquard - 2001 - Foundations of Physics 31 (4):623-640.
    The one-dimensional case of the homogeneous Hamilton–Jacobi and Bernoulli equations St $${\raise0.7ex\hbox{$1$} \!\mathord{\left/ {\vphantom {1 2}}\right.\kern-0em}\!\lower0.7ex\hbox{$2$}}$$ S x 2 =0, where S(x, t) is Hamilton's principal function of a free particle and also Bernoulli's momentum potential of a perfect liquid, is considered. Non-elementary solutions are looked for in terms of odd power series in t with x-dependent coefficients and even power series in x with t-dependent coefficients. In both cases, and depending upon initial conditions, unexpected regularities are observed (...)
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  22.  24
    Maclean's Evolutionary Neuroscience, the Csn Model and Hamilton's Rule: Some Developmental, Clinical, and Social Policy Implications. [REVIEW]Gerald A. Cory - 2002 - Brain and Mind 3 (1):151-181.
    Paul MacLean, founder and long-time chief ofthe Laboratory of Brain Evolution and Behavior,National Institutes of Health, is a pioneeringfigure in the emergent field of evolutionaryneuroscience. His influence has been widelyfelt in the development of biologicalpsychiatry and has led to a considerableliterature on evolutionary approaches toclinical issues. MacLean's work is alsoenjoying a resurgence of interest in academicareas of neuroscience and evolutionarypsychology which have previously shown littleinterest or knowledge of his extensive work. This chapter builds on MacLean's work to bringtogether new insights (...)
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  23. La teoria della quantificazione del predicato di William Hamilton e la rinascita della logica.Dino Buzzetti - 1973 - Rivista di Filosofia 64 (4):295-337.
    Sir William Hamilton's theory of the quantification of the predicate is presented and discussed with reference to the contemporary debate on logic.
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  24.  79
    Luck and Equality: Susan Hurley.Susan Hurley - 2001 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75 (1):51–72.
    [ Susan Hurley] I argue that the aim to neutralize the influence of luck on distribution cannot provide a basis for egalitarianism: it can neither specify nor justify an egalitarian distribution. Luck and responsibility can play a role in determining what justice requires to be redistributed, but from this we cannot derive how to distribute: we cannot derive a pattern of distribution from the 'currency' of distributive justice. I argue that the contrary view faces a dilemma, according to whether (...)
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  25. An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy and of the Principal Philosophical Questions Discussed in His Writings.John Stuart Mill - 1866 - University of Toronto Press.
  26.  23
    Philosophy and Feminism: The Case of Susan Bordo.E. Bernick Susan - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (3):188 - 196.
    In this paper I lay out what I take to be the crucial insights in Susan Bordo's "Feminist Skepticism and the 'Maleness' of Philosophy" and point out some additional difficulties with the skeptical position. I call attention to an ambiguity in the nature or content of the "maleness" of philosophy that Bordo identifies. Finally, I point out that, unlike some feminist skeptics, Bordo never loses sight in her work of women's lived experiences.
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  27.  25
    Susan Wolf, The Variety of Values: Essays on Morality, Meaning, and Love. [REVIEW]Sara Protasi - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2015 (06.08).
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  28.  46
    Evidence and Inquiry by Susan Haack.James Cargile - 1996 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (3):621-625.
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  29.  15
    Philosophy of Logics By Susan Haack Cambridge University Press, 1978, Xvi + 276 Pp., £13.50. [REVIEW]Max Black - 1981 - Philosophy 56 (217):435-.
  30. Sir William Hamilton: The Philosophy of Perception.James Hutchison Stirling - 1865
     
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  31. Hamilton.John Veitch - 1883 - Mind 8 (30):289-291.
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  32. The Philosophy of the Infinite, with Special Reference to the Theories of Sir W. Hamilton and M. Cousin.Henry Calderwood - 1861
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  33. An Examination of Sir William Hamilton’s Philosophy, and of the Principal Philosophical Questions Discussed in His Writings.John Stuart Mill - 1865 - Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts & Green.
     
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  34. Sir William Hamilton Being the Philosophy of Perception, an Analysis.James Hutchison Stirling - 1990
     
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  35. Sir William Hamilton, the Man and His Philosophy, 2 Lects.John Veitch - 1883
     
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  36.  78
    Susan Stebbing, Incomplete Symbols and Foundherentist Meta-Ontology.Frederique Janssen-Lauret - 2017 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 5 (2):6-17.
    Susan Stebbing’s work on incomplete symbols and analysis was instrumental in clarifying, sharpening, and improving the project of logical constructions which was pivotal to early analytic philosophy. She dispelled use-mention confusions by restricting the term ‘incomplete symbol’ to expressions eliminable through analysis, rather than those expressions’ purported referents, and distinguished linguistic analysis from analysis of facts. In this paper I explore Stebbing’s role in analytic philosophy’s development from anti-holism, presupposing that analysis terminates in simples, to the more holist or (...)
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  37.  98
    Hamilton's Two Conceptions of Social Fitness.Jonathan Birch - 2016 - Philosophy of Science 83 (5):848-860.
    Hamilton introduced two conceptions of social fitness, which he called neighbour-modulated fitness and inclusive fitness. Although he regarded them as formally equivalent, a re-analysis of his own argument for their equivalence brings out two important assumptions on which it rests: weak additivity and actor's control. When weak additivity breaks down, neither fitness concept is appropriate in its original form. When actor's control breaks down, neighbour-modulated fitness may be appropriate, but inclusive fitness is not. Yet I argue that, despite its (...)
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  38. Susan Stuart & Gordana Dodig Crnkovic : 'Computation, Information, Cognition: The Nexus and the Liminal'. [REVIEW]Vincent C. Müller - 2009 - Cybernetics and Human Knowing 16 (3-4):201-203.
    Review of: "Computation, Information, Cognition: The Nexus and the Liminal", Ed. Susan Stuart & Gordana Dodig Crnkovic, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, September 2007, xxiv+340pp, ISBN: 9781847180902, Hardback: £39.99, $79.99 ---- Are you a computer? Is your cat a computer? A single biological cell in your stomach, perhaps? And your desk? You do not think so? Well, the authors of this book suggest that you think again. They propose a computational turn, a turn towards computational explanation and towards the explanation (...)
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  39. Spinoza on Philosophy, Religion, and Politics, by Susan James (Review). [REVIEW]Eugene Marshall - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (2):318-319.
    Event synopsis: Professor Susan James inverses Leo Strauss’ reading of Spinoza. Whereas Strauss emphasized the hidden subtext of Spinoza’s arguments, James revives the explicit debates of his time within which Spinoza's Theologico-Political Treatise was situated. But this is not a simple historical reconstruction. James’ close reading of the Treatise offers a radically new perspective on Spinoza’s revolutionary book – a reading that presents startling new perspective on the political, metaphysical and theological implications of the book. Given the importance of (...)
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  40.  9
    Happiness and Meaning: Two Aspects of the Good Life: Susan Wolf.Susan Wolf - 1997 - Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (1):207-225.
    The topic of self-interest raises large and intractable philosophical questions–most obviously, the question “In what does self-interest consist?” The concept, as opposed to the content of self-interest, however, seems clear enough. Self-interest is interest in one's own good. To act self-interestedly is to act on the motive of advancing one's own good. Whether what one does actually is in one's self-interest depends on whether it actually does advance, or at least, minimize the decline of, one's own good. Though it may (...)
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  41. Review of Susan Haack, Deviant Logic, Fuzzy Logic: Beyond the Formalism[REVIEW]Achille C. Varzi - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (3):468-471.
    Book information: Deviant Logic, Fuzzy Logic: Beyond The Formalism. By SUSAN HAACK. Chicago, Ill.: University of Chicago Press, 1996. Pp. xxvi, 291.
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  42. Susan Stebbing's Criticism of Wittgenstein's Tractatus.Nikolay Milkov - 2003 - Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 10:351-63.
    Susan Stebbing’s paper “Logical Positivism and Analysis” (March 1933) was unusually critical of Wittgenstein. It put up a sharp opposition between Cambridge analytic philosophy of Moore and Russell and the positivist philosophy of the Vienna Circle to which she included Wittgenstein from 1929–32. Above all, positivists were interested in analyzing language, analytic philosophers in analyzing facts. Moreover, whereas analytic philosophers were engaged in directional analysis which seeks to illuminate the multiplicity of the analyzed facts, positivists aimed at final analysis (...)
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  43.  83
    On Hamilton-Jacobi Theory as a Classical Root of Quantum Theory.Jeremy Butterfield - unknown
    This paper gives a technically elementary treatment of some aspects of Hamilton -Jacobi theory, especially in relation to the calculus of variations. The second half of the paper describes the application to geometric optics, the optico-mechanical analogy and the transition to quantum mechanics. Finally, I report recent work of Holland providing a Hamiltonian formulation of the pilot-wave theory.
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  44.  6
    I—Susan James: Creating Rational Understanding: Spinoza as a Social Epistemologist.Susan James - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):181-199.
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  45. A Short Review of Consciousness in Action by Susan Hurley.Axel Cleeremans & Erik Myin - 1999 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 3:455-458.
    Consider Susan Hurley's depiction of mainstream views of the mind: "The mind is a kind of sandwich, and cognition is the filling" (p. 401). This particular sandwich (with perception as the bottom loaf and action as the top loaf) tastes foul to Hurley, who devotes most of "Consciousness in Action" to a systematic and sometimes extraordinarily detailed critique of what has otherwise been dubbed "classical" models of the mind. This critique then provides the basis for her alternative proposal, in (...)
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  46.  21
    Formalism, Hamilton and Complex Numbers.John O'Neill - 1986 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 17 (3):351-372.
    The development and applicability of complex numbers is often cited in defence of the formalist philosophy of mathematics. This view is rejected through an examination of hamilton's development of the notion of complex numbers as ordered pairs of reals, And his later development of the quaternion theory, Which subsequently formed the basis of vector analysis. Formalism, By protecting informal assumptions from critical scrutiny, Constrained rather than encouraged the development of mathematics.
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  47.  15
    "Dynamical, Ecological Sub-Persons" Commentary on Susan HurleyÂ's Consciousness in Action.Anthony Chemero & William Cordeiro - unknown
    In a way that is rarely even attempted, and even more rarely actually pulled off, Susan Hurley, in her book Consciousness in Action, brings scientific ideas into contact with mainstream philosophy. It is not at all unusual for empirical results from cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience to be raised in discussion of issues in philosophy of science and philosophy of mind--Dennett and the Churchlands, for example, have been doing so for years. But Hurley attempts to draw empirical results even (...)
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  48.  3
    The Role of Formal Logic in Hamilton's Argument for the Philosophy of the Conditioned.James W. Allard - 2017 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 15 (2):197-211.
    This paper reconstructs Sir William Hamilton's argument for thinking that the unconditioned is not an object of thought, a conclusion he abbreviates with the slogan ‘to think is to condition’. The paper describes Hamilton's conception of formal logic as the study of the laws of thought and claims that this conception allows these laws, particularly those of non-contradiction and excluded middle, to play a substantive role in Hamilton's argument.
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  49.  84
    Susan Wolf, Meaning in Life and Why It Matters.Simon Derpmann - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):421-422.
    Susan Wolf, Meaning in Life and Why it Matters Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s10677-011-9321-8 Authors Simon Derpmann, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Philosophisches Seminar, Domplatz 23, 48143 Münster, Germany Journal Ethical Theory and Moral Practice Online ISSN 1572-8447 Print ISSN 1386-2820.
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    Yerkes, Hamilton and the Experimental Study of the Ape Mind: From Evolutionary Psychiatry to Eugenic Politics.Marion Thomas - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (2):273-294.
    Robert Yerkes is a pivotal figure in American psychology and primatology in the first half of the twentieth century. As is well known, Yerkes first studied ape intelligence in 1915, on a visit to the private California laboratory of the psychiatrist Gilbert Hamilton, a former student. Less widely appreciated is how far the work done at the Hamilton lab, in its aims and ambitions as well as its techniques, served as a template for much of Yerkes’s research thereafter. (...)
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