97 found
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  1. Passion and action: the emotions in seventeenth-century philosophy.Susan James - 1997 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Passion and Action is an exploration of the role of the passions in seventeenth-century thought. Susan James offers fresh readings of a broad range of thinkers, including such canonical figures as Hobbes, Descartes, Malebranche, Spinoza, Pascal, and Locke, and shows that a full understanding of their philosophies must take account of their interpretations of our affective life. This ground-breaking study throws new light upon the shaping of our ideas about the mind, knowledge, and action, and provides a historical context for (...)
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  2. Spinoza on Philosophy, Religion, and Politics: The Theologico-Political Treatise.Susan James - 2012 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    Susan James explores the revolutionary political thought of one of the most radical and creative of modern philosophers, Baruch Spinoza. His Theologico-Political Treatise of 1670 defends religious pluralism, political republicanism, and intellectual freedom. James shows how this work played a crucial role in the development of modern society.
  3. The philosophical innovations of Margaret Cavendish.Susan James - 1999 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (2):219 – 244.
  4. Beyond Equality and Difference: Citizenship, Feminist Politics and Female Subjectivity.Gisela Bock & Susan James (eds.) - 1992 - New York: Routledge.
    Historically, as well as more recently, women's emancipation has been seen in two ways: sometimes as the `right to be equal' and sometimes as the `right to be different'. These views have often overlapped and interacted: in a variety of guises they have played an important role in both the development of ideas about women and feminism, and the works of political thinkers by no means primarily concerned with women's liberation. The chapters of this book deal primarily with the meaning (...)
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  5.  11
    Spinoza on Learning to Live Together.Susan James - 2020 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    Philosophising, as Spinoza conceives it, is the project of learning to live joyfully. This in turn is a matter of learning to live together, and the most obvious test of philosophical insight is our capacity to sustain a harmonious way of life. Susan James defends this interpretation and explores Spinoza's influence on contemporary debates.
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  6.  95
    Spinoza: thoughts on hope in our political present.Moira Gatens, Justin Steinberg, Aurelia Armstrong, Susan James & Martin Saar - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (1):200-231.
  7.  65
    The Content of Social Explanation.Susan James - 1984 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This is a study of the central questions of explanation in the social sciences, and a defence of 'holism' against 'individualism'. In the first half of the book Susan James sets out very clearly the philosophical background to this controversy. She locates its source not at the analytical level at which most of the debate is usually conducted but at a more fundamental, moral level, in different conceptions of the human individual. In the second half of the book she examines (...)
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  8. Feminism in philosophy of mind: The question of personal identity.Susan James - 2000 - In Miranda Fricker & Jennifer Hornsby (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 29--45.
  9.  58
    Narrative as the means to freedom: Spinoza on the uses of imagination.Susan James - 2010 - In Yitzhak Y. Melamed & Michael A. Rosenthal (eds.), Spinoza's 'Theological-Political Treatise': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press. pp. 250.
  10. I—Susan James: Creating Rational Understanding: Spinoza as a Social Epistemologist.Susan James - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):181-199.
    Does Spinoza present philosophy as the preserve of an elite, while condemning the uneducated to a false though palliative form of ‘true religion’? Some commentators have thought so, but this contribution aims to show that they are mistaken. The form of religious life that Spinoza recommends creates the political and epistemological conditions for a gradual transition to philosophical understanding, so that true religion and philosophy are in practice inseparable.
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  11. Rights as enforceable claims.Susan James - 2003 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (2):133–147.
    Unless rights are claimable, it is sometimes argued, they are no more than rhetorical gestures which mock the poor and needy. But what makes a right claimable? If rights are to avoid the charge of emptiness, I argue, they must be effectively enforceable. But what does this involve? I identify three conditions of enforceability, and four sets of broader circumstances in which these conditions can be met. I discuss the implications of this analysis of rights for multicultural societies, and conclude (...)
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  12.  26
    Democracy and the good life in Spinoza's philosophy.Susan James - 2008 - In Charles Huenemann (ed.), Interpreting Spinoza: Critical Essays. Cambridge University Press.
  13. Sympathy and comparison : Two principles of human nature.Susan James - 2005 - In Marina Frasca-Spada & P. J. E. Kail (eds.), Impressions of Hume. Oxford University Press. pp. 61--107.
  14. Freedom and the Imaginary.Susan James - 2002 - In Susan James & Stephanie Palmer (eds.), Visible Women: Essays on Feminist Legal Theory and Political Philosophy. Hart.
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  15.  22
    The Content of Social Explanation.Russell Keat & Susan James - 1988 - Philosophical Review 97 (2):283.
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  16.  63
    Freedom, slavery and the passions.Susan James - 2009 - In Olli Koistinen (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza's Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 223--241.
    Book synopsis: Since its publication in 1677, Spinoza’s Ethics has fascinated philosophers, novelists, and scientists alike. It is undoubtedly one of the most exciting and contested works of Western philosophy. Written in an austere, geometrical fashion, the work teaches us how we should live, ending with an ethics in which the only thing good in itself is understanding. Spinoza argues that only that which hinders us from understanding is bad and shows that those endowed with a human mind should devote (...)
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  17. The passions in metaphysics and the theory of action'.Susan James - 1998 - In Daniel Garber & Michael Ayers (eds.), The Cambridge History of Seventeenth-Century Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 1--913.
     
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  18.  15
    Rights as Enforceable Claims.Susan James - 2003 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (2):133-147.
  19.  22
    The Power of Spinoza: Feminist Conjunctions.Susan James, Genevieve Lloyd & Moira Gatens - 1998 - Women’s Philosophy Review 19:6-28.
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  20. Power and difference: Spinoza's conception of freedom.Susan James - 1996 - Journal of Political Philosophy 4 (3):207–228.
  21.  11
    VII-Rights as Enforceable Claims.Susan James - 2003 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (1):133-147.
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  22.  30
    The affective cost of philosophical self-transformation.Susan James - forthcoming - Intellectual History Review.
    It is not uncommon for early-modern philosophers to portray a perfectly philosophical way of life as a condition that approaches the divine. The philosopher becomes as like God as a human being can, and in doing so experiences unparalleled and unalloyed joy. Spinoza advocates a version of this view and defends it with impressive consistency. To suggest that the process of philosophical enlightenment involves any affective cost, he argues, is simply to display a lack of understanding, and thus to fall (...)
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  23.  45
    'Hermaphroditical mixtures': Margaret Cavendish on nature and art.Susan James - 2018 - In Emily Thomas (ed.), Early Modern Women on Metaphysics. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    Cavendish is critical of two of the experimental sciences of her day: chemistry and microscopy. Rather than creating new things, as their practitioners claim, they produce 'hermaphroditical mixtures'. I trace this startling metaphor to the alchemical tradition and suggest how its origins can help us to understand Cavendish's position. In her view, the chemists and microscopists exaggerate their own power and creativity, and fail to recognise that human creativity belongs primarily to imagination. I show how this theme is worked out (...)
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  24.  10
    Models of contact: ontological, linguistic, medical, and political.Susan James - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-9.
  25.  72
    Why Should We Read Spinoza?Susan James - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:109-125.
    Historians of philosophy are well aware of the limitations of what Butterfield called ‘Whig history’: narratives of historical progress that culminate in an enlightened present. Yet many recent studies retain a somewhat teleological outlook. Why should this be so? To explain it, I propose, we need to take account of the emotional investments that guide our interest in the philosophical past, and the role they play in shaping what we understand as the history of philosophy. As far as I know, (...)
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  26.  46
    Visible women: essays on feminist legal theory and political philosophy.Susan James & Stephanie Palmer (eds.) - 2002 - Portland, Or.: Hart.
    These questions lie at the heart of contemporary feminist theory, and in this collection they are addressed by a group of distinguished international scholars ...
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  27.  35
    Complicity and Slavery in The Second Sex.Susan James - 2003 - In Claudia Card (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge University Press. pp. 149--167.
  28. Explaining the passions: passions, desires, and the explanation of action.Susan James - 1998 - In Stephen Gaukroger (ed.), The Soft Underbelly of Reason: The Passions in the Seventeenth Century. Routledge.
     
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  29.  18
    Power and Difference: Spinoza's Conception of Freedom.Susan James - 1996 - Journal of Political Philosophy 4 (3):207-228.
  30.  66
    The duty to relieve suffering.Susan James - 1982 - Ethics 93 (1):4-21.
  31.  47
    XIII. Passion and Politics.Susan James - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:221-234.
    The sudden resurgence of interest in the emotions that has recently overtaken analytical philosophy has raised a range of questions about the place of the passions in established explanatory schemes. How, for example, do the emotions fit into theories of action organized around beliefs and desires? How can they be included in analyses of the mind developed to account for other mental states and capacities? Questions of this general form also arise within political philosophy, and the wish to acknowledge their (...)
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  32. A New Source for Shakespeare‘s Taming of the Shrew.Susan James - 1999 - Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 81 (1):49-62.
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  33. 4 The emergence of the Cartesian mind.Susan James - 2000 - In Tim Crane & Sarah Patterson (eds.), History of the Mind-Body Problem. New York: Routledge. pp. 111.
     
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  34. Spinoza and materialism.Susan James - 2005 - In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), Current continental theory and modern philosophy. Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press.
  35. Fruitful Imagining: On Catherine Wilson's 'Grief and the Poet'.Susan James - 2013 - British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):97-101.
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  36.  81
    Wanting to understand. Spinoza on the virtue of fortitudo.Susan James - 2016 - In .
    To become more free, Spinoza argues, we need to develop the virtue of fortitudo - the determination to enlarge our understanding and live as it dictates. In an era of post-factual politics, there is arguably a need for this virtue, and in this piece I examine Spinoza's account of the process by which it is acquired. As he sees it, I argue, the process is gradual and is always a collective one. Part of the task of politics is therefore to (...)
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  37.  3
    Surplus Suffering: The Case of Portuguese Immigrant Women.Juanne Clarke & Susan James - 2001 - Feminist Review 68 (1):167-170.
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  38.  29
    Are moral rights natural or artificial? Hobbes and Spinoza.Susan James - unknown
  39.  29
    ‘Against them all for to fight’: Friar John Pickering and the Pilgrimage of Grace.Susan James - 2003 - Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 85 (1):37-64.
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  40.  3
    Booknotes.Susan James - 1986 - Philosophy 61:424.
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  41.  55
    Benedict de Spinoza.Susan James - 2012 - The Philosophers' Magazine 58:57-59.
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  42.  6
    Benedict de Spinoza.Susan James - 2012 - The Philosophers' Magazine 58:57-59.
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  43.  12
    Civil and religious power in Spinoza's 'Tractatus Theologico-Politicus'.Susan James - unknown
  44. Complicity and Slavery in The Second Sex.Susan James - 2004 - In Emily R. Grosholz (ed.), The Legacy of Simone de Beauvoir. Clarendon Press.
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  45.  13
    Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz. The concept of substance in seventeenth‐century metaphysics.Susan James - 1995 - Philosophical Books 36 (1):45-47.
  46.  3
    Editorial: Fourth Critique.Susan James - 1986 - Philosophy 61:435.
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  47.  21
    Gossip, Stories and Friendship: Confidentiality in Midwifery Practice.Susan James - 1995 - Nursing Ethics 2 (4):295-302.
    Women often seek midwifery care as an alternative to the maternity services that are readily available within the insured health care system in Alberta. Some aspects of community-based, primary care midwifery in Alberta that characterize this alternative are the use of story-telling as a form of knowledge, the development of social con nections among women seeking midwifery care, and nonauthoritarian relationships between midwives and women. In this paper, the concept of confidentiality, as it relates to these aspects of midwifery practice, (...)
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  48.  47
    I—The Presidential Address Freedom and Nature: A Spinozist Invitation.Susan James - 2016 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 116 (1):1-19.
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  49. Louis Althusser.Susan James - 1985 - In Quentin Skinner (ed.), The Return of grand theory in the human sciences. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 141--158.
  50.  4
    Life and Death in Early Modern Philosophy.Susan James (ed.) - 2021 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This book explores the breadth of philosophical interest in life and death during the early modern period. It connects debates in philosophy with the life sciences, linking the study of organisms to the practical aspect of philosophy, and reminding us that that philosophers were concerned with learning how to live and how to die.
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