Results for 'Susan M. Wilcox'

999 found
Order:
  1.  24
    Differential Classical Eyelid Conditioning as a Function of CS Intensity, CS Rise Time, and Interstimulus Interval.Susan M. Wilcox & Leonard E. Ross - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (2):272.
  2.  57
    Managing Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: Analysis and Recommendations.Susan M. Wolf, Frances P. Lawrenz, Charles A. Nelson, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Mildred K. Cho, Ellen Wright Clayton, Joel G. Fletcher, Michael K. Georgieff, Dale Hammerschmidt, Kathy Hudson, Judy Illes, Vivek Kapur, Moira A. Keane, Barbara A. Koenig, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Elizabeth G. McFarland, Jordan Paradise, Lisa S. Parker, Sharon F. Terry, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):219-248.
    No consensus yet exists on how to handle incidental fnd-ings in human subjects research. Yet empirical studies document IFs in a wide range of research studies, where IFs are fndings beyond the aims of the study that are of potential health or reproductive importance to the individual research participant. This paper reports recommendations of a two-year project group funded by NIH to study how to manage IFs in genetic and genomic research, as well as imaging research. We conclude that researchers (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   105 citations  
  3.  44
    Feminism & Bioethics: Beyond Reproduction.Susan M. Wolf (ed.) - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    Bioethics has paid surprisingly little attention to the special problems faced by women and to feminist analyses of current health care issues other than ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  4.  29
    Returning a Research Participant's Genomic Results to Relatives: Analysis and Recommendations.Susan M. Wolf, Rebecca Branum, Barbara A. Koenig, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan A. Berry, Laura M. Beskow, Mary B. Daly, Conrad V. Fernandez, Robert C. Green, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Noralane M. Lindor, P. Pearl O'Rourke, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Mark A. Rothstein, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):440-463.
    Genomic research results and incidental findings with health implications for a research participant are of potential interest not only to the participant, but also to the participant's family. Yet investigators lack guidance on return of results to relatives, including after the participant's death. In this paper, a national working group offers consensus analysis and recommendations, including an ethical framework to guide investigators in managing this challenging issue, before and after the participant's death.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  5.  33
    The Law of Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: Establishing Researchers' Duties.Susan M. Wolf, Jordan Paradise & Charlisse Caga-Anan - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):361-383.
    Technology has outpaced the capacity of researchers performing research on human participants to interpret all data generated and handle those data responsibly. This poses a critical challenge to existing rules governing human subjects research. The technologies used in research to generate images, scans, and data can now produce so much information that there is significant potential for incidental findings, findings generated in the course of research but beyond the aims of the study. Neuroimaging scans may visualize the entire brain and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  6.  6
    Return of Results in Participant-Driven Research: Learning From Transformative Research Models.Susan M. Wolf - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (S1):159-166.
    Participant-driven research is a burgeoning domain of research innovation, often facilitated by mobile technologies. Return of results and data are common hallmarks, grounded in transparency and data democracy. PDR has much to teach traditional research about these practices and successful engagement. Recommendations calling for new state laws governing research with mHealth modalities common in PDR and federal creation of review mechanisms, threaten to stifle valuable participant-driven innovation, including in return of results.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  24
    The Challenge of Incidental Findings.Susan M. Wolf - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):216-218.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  8.  45
    Gene Therapy Oversight: Lessons for Nanobiotechnology.Susan M. Wolf, Rishi Gupta & Peter Kohlhepp - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):659-684.
    Oversight of human gene transfer research presents an important model with potential application to oversight of nanobiology research on human participants. Gene therapy oversight adds centralized federal review at the National Institutes of Health's Office of Biotechnology Activities and its Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee to standard oversight of human subjects research at the researcher's institution and at the federal level by the Office for Human Research Protections. The Food and Drug Administration's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research oversees human gene (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  9.  28
    Beyond "Genetic Discrimination": Toward the Broader Harm of Geneticism.Susan M. Wolf - 1995 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 23 (4):345-353.
    The current explosion of genetic knowledge and the rapid proliferation of genetic tests has rightly provoked concern that we are approaching a future in which people will be labeled and disadvantaged based on genetic information. Indeed, some have already suffered harm, including denial of health insurance. This concern has prompted an outpouring of analysis. Yet almost all of it approaches the problem of genetic disadvantage under the rubric of “genetic discrimination.”This rubric is woefully inadequate to the task at hand. It (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  10.  7
    The Continuing Evolution of Ethical Standards for Genomic Sequencing in Clinical Care: Restoring Patient Choice.Susan M. Wolf - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (3):333-340.
    Developing ethical standards for clinical use of large-scale genome and exome sequencing has proven challenging, in part due to the inevitability of incidental or secondary findings. Policy of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics has evolved but remains problematic. In 2013, ACMG issued policy recommending mandatory analysis of 56 extra genes whenever sequencing was ordered for any indication, in order to ascertain positive findings in pathogenic and actionable genes. Widespread objection yielded a 2014 amendment allowing patients to opt-out (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11.  8
    The Past, Present, and Future of Informed Consent in Research and Translational Medicine.Susan M. Wolf, Ellen Wright Clayton & Frances Lawrenz - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (1):7-11.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12.  45
    The Moral Self and the Indirect Passions.Susan M. Purviance - 1997 - Hume Studies 23 (2):195-212.
    I argue that Hume and Kant avoid any scepticism about the unity of the self which would undermine a practical notion of the moral self. Specifically, David Hume provides for the authenticity of a moral self unified by the indirect passions of pride and humility. These passions take the self as their object and, thus, make moot any worries about personal identity from Book One of Hume's Treatise. This account of the moral self, which I call the fact of agency (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  13.  38
    The Relational Self: An Interpersonal Social-Cognitive Theory.Susan M. Andersen & Serena Chen - 2002 - Psychological Review 109 (4):619-645.
  14.  7
    Health Care Reform and the Future of Physician Ethics.Susan M. Wolf - 1994 - Hastings Center Report 24 (2):28-41.
  15.  2
    Integrating Rules for Genomic Research, Clinical Care, Public Health Screening and DTC Testing: Creating Translational Law for Translational Genomics.Susan M. Wolf, Pilar N. Ossorio, Susan A. Berry, Henry T. Greely, Amy L. McGuire, Michelle A. Penny & Sharon F. Terry - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (1):69-86.
    Human genomics is a translational field spanning research, clinical care, public health, and direct-to-consumer testing. However, law differs across these domains on issues including liability, consent, promoting quality of analysis and interpretation, and safeguarding privacy. Genomic activities crossing domains can thus encounter confusion and conflicts among these approaches. This paper suggests how to resolve these conflicts while protecting the rights and interests of individuals sequenced. Translational genomics requires this more translational approach to law.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  23
    Pragmatic Tools for Sharing Genomic Research Results with the Relatives of Living and Deceased Research Participants.Susan M. Wolf, Emily Scholtes, Barbara A. Koenig, Gloria M. Petersen, Susan A. Berry, Laura M. Beskow, Mary B. Daly, Conrad V. Fernandez, Robert C. Green, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Noralane M. Lindor, P. Pearl O'Rourke, Carmen Radecki Breitkopf, Mark A. Rothstein, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (1):87-109.
    Returning genomic research results to family members raises complex questions. Genomic research on life-limiting conditions such as cancer, and research involving storage and reanalysis of data and specimens long into the future, makes these questions pressing. This author group, funded by an NIH grant, published consensus recommendations presenting a framework. This follow-up paper offers concrete guidance and tools for implementation. The group collected and analyzed relevant documents and guidance, including tools from the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium. The authors then (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  8
    Mapping the Ethics of Translational Genomics: Situating Return of Results and Navigating the Research‐Clinical Divide.Susan M. Wolf, Wylie Burke & Barbara A. Koenig - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):486-501.
    Both bioethics and law have governed human genomics by distinguishing research from clinical practice. Yet the rise of translational genomics now makes this traditional dichotomy inadequate. This paper pioneers a new approach to the ethics of translational genomics. It maps the full range of ethical approaches needed, proposes a “layered” approach to determining the ethics framework for projects combining research and clinical care, and clarifies the key role that return of results can play in advancing translation.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  18.  33
    An Explanation and Analysis of How World Religions Formulate Their Ethical Decisions on Withdrawing Treatment and Determining Death.Susan M. Setta & Sam D. Shemie - 2015 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10:6.
    This paper explores definitions of death from the perspectives of several world and indigenous religions, with practical application for health care providers in relation to end of life decisions and organ and tissue donation after death. It provides background material on several traditions and explains how different religions derive their conclusions for end of life decisions from the ethical guidelines they proffer.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19.  10
    Ethics Committees: In The Courts.Susan M. Wolf - 1986 - Hastings Center Report 16 (3):12-15.
  20.  61
    Teaching Business Ethics: The Effectiveness of Common Pedagogical Practices in Developing Students' Moral Judgment Competence.Susan M. Bosco, David E. Melchar, Laura L. Beauvais & David E. Desplaces - 2010 - Ethics and Education 5 (3):263 - 280.
    This study investigates the effectiveness of pedagogical practices used to teach business ethics. The business community has greatly increased its demands for better ethics education in business programs. Educators have generally agreed that the ethical principles of business people have declined. It is important, then, to examine how common methods of instruction used in business ethics could contribute to the development of higher levels of moral judgment competence for students. To determine the effectiveness of these methods, moral judgment competence levels (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  21.  31
    Using Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis to Create a Stem Cell Donor: Issues, Guidelines & Limits.Susan M. Wolf, Jeffrey P. Kahn & John E. Wagner - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (3):327-339.
    Successful preimplantation genetic diagnosis to avoid creating a child affected by a genetically-based disorder was reported in 1989. Since then PGD has been used to biopsy and analyze embryos created through in viuo fertilization to avoid transferring to the mother’s uterus an embryo affected by a mutation or chromosomal abnormality associated with serious illness. PGD to avoid serious and early-onset illness in the child-to-be is widely accepted. PGD prevents gestation of an affected embryo and reduces the chance that the parents (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  22.  11
    Holding the Line on Euthanasia.Susan M. Wolf - 1989 - Hastings Center Report 19 (1):13-15.
  23.  51
    Due Process in Ethics Committee Case Review.Susan M. Wolf - 1992 - HEC Forum 4 (2):83-96.
  24.  31
    Connecting the Two Faces of Csr: Does Employee Volunteerism Improve Compliance?Susan M. Houghton, Joan T. A. Gabel & David W. Williams - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):477 - 494.
    In 2004, the United States Sentencing Commission amended the Federal Sentencing Guidelines to allow firms that create “effective compliance and ethics programs” to receive better treatment if prosecuted for fraud. Effective compliance and ethics, however, appear to be limited to activities focused on complying with the firms’ internal legal and ethical standards. We explored a potential connection between the firms’ external corporate social responsibility (CSR) behaviors and internal compliance: Is there an organizationally valid relationship between these two firm activities? That (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  25.  38
    So Long as They Grow Out of It: Comics, The Discourse of Developmental Normalcy, and Disability. [REVIEW]Susan M. Squier - 2008 - Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (2):71-88.
    This essay draws on two emerging fields—the study of comics or graphic fiction, and disability studies—to demonstrate how graphic fictions articulate the embodied, ethical, and sociopolitical experiences of impairment and disability. Examining David B’s Epileptic and Paul Karasik and Judy Karasik’s The Ride Together, I argue that these graphic novels unsettle conventional notions of normalcy and disability. In so doing, they also challenge our assumed dimensions and possibilities of the comics genre and medium, demonstrating the great potential comics hold for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  26.  14
    Conflict Between Doctor and Patient.Susan M. Wolf - 1988 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 16 (3-4):197-203.
  27.  6
    Toward a Theory of Process.Susan M. Wolf - 1992 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (4):278-290.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  28. Confronting Physician Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: My Father's Death.Susan M. Wolf - 2008 - Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 23-26.
  29.  10
    Reflections on Apologies and the Studies in Tuskegee and Guatemala.Susan M. Reverby - 2012 - Ethics and Behavior 22 (6):493-495.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30. The Unconscious Relational Self.Susan M. Andersen, Inga Reznik & Noah S. Glassman - 2005 - In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. pp. 421-481.
  31.  83
    Neurolaw: The Big Question.Susan M. Wolf - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (1):21 – 22.
  32.  16
    More Than Fact and Fiction: Cultural Memory and the Tuskegee Syphilis Study.Susan M. Reverby - 2001 - Hastings Center Report 31 (5):22-28.
  33.  16
    Genetic Testing and the Future of Disability Insurance: Ethics, Law & Policy.Susan M. Wolf & Jeffrey P. Kahn - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (s2):6-32.
    Predictive genetic testing poses fundamental questions for disability insurance, a crucial resource funding basic needs when disability prevents income from work. This article, from an NIH-funded project, presents the first indepth analysis of the challenging issues: Should disability insurers be permitted to consider genetics and exclude predicted disability? May disabilities with a recognized genetic basis be excluded from coverage as pre-existing conditions? How can we assure that private insurers writing individual and group policies, employers, and public insurers deal competently and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  34.  9
    Stress‐Induced Mutation Via DNA Breaks in Escherichia Coli: A Molecular Mechanism with Implications for Evolution and Medicine.Susan M. Rosenberg, Chandan Shee, Ryan L. Frisch & P. J. Hastings - 2012 - Bioessays 34 (10):885-892.
  35.  6
    Using Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis to Create a Stem Cell Donor: Issues, Guidelines & Limits.Susan M. Wolf, Jeffrey P. Kahn & John E. Wagner - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (3):327-339.
    Successful preimplantation genetic diagnosis to avoid creating a child affected by a genetically-based disorder was reported in 1989. Since then PGD has been used to biopsy and analyze embryos created through in viuo fertilization to avoid transferring to the mother’s uterus an embryo affected by a mutation or chromosomal abnormality associated with serious illness. PGD to avoid serious and early-onset illness in the child-to-be is widely accepted. PGD prevents gestation of an affected embryo and reduces the chance that the parents (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  36.  9
    Ban Cloning? Why NBAC Is Wrong.Susan M. Wolf - 1997 - Hastings Center Report 27 (5):12-15.
  37.  12
    “Special Treatment”: BiDil, Tuskegee, and the Logic of Race.Susan M. Reverby - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (3):478-484.
    The presence of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study was palpable at the June 16, 2005, Food and Drug Administration’s Advisory Committee meeting on BiDil, a heart medication from the pharmaceutical company NitroMed that sought approval as the first race-specific drug. So ubiquitous is the restless and unsettled spirit of Tuskegee that it continues to hover over the African American public and the biomedical research/health care provider communities more than three and a half decades after the actual study “died.” No one invoked (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38.  33
    Bioethics Matures: The Field Faces the Future.Susan M. Wolf & Jeffrey P. Kahn - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (4):22-24.
  39.  3
    Genetic Testing and the Future of Disability Insurance: Ethics, Law & Policy.Susan M. Wolf & Jeffrey P. Kahn - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (S2):6-32.
    Genetic testing poses fundamental questions for insurance. Testing can predict a low probability of future illness and disability, which can help promote the insurability of individuals with a family history of genetic risk, but it can also invite insurers to reject applicants, increase premiums, exclude people with certain illnesses and disabilities, and otherwise adjust the underwriting processes for individuals with certain genotypes. In the workplace, these issues may cause employers who offer or pay for insurance to alter their hiring behavior, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  40.  23
    The Challenge of Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research: Protecting Participants, Workers, Bystanders, and the Environment.Susan M. Wolf - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):712-715.
  41.  18
    “Special Treatment”: BiDil, Tuskegee, and the Logic of Race.Susan M. Reverby - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (3):478-484.
    BiDil, a drug approved in 2005 by the FDA only for African Americans, was seen by many as almost reparations for the horrors of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study where treatment for black men was denied. The logic of race, however, rather than racism, links BiDil to the past many thought it was escaping.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42.  72
    The Apriority of Moral Feeling.Susan M. Purviance - 1999 - Idealistic Studies 29 (1/2):75-87.
    The apriority of moral feeling is an indispensable part of Kant's insistence on moral certainty as a foundation for ethics. Even though the moral feeling of respect cannot be the source of our knowledge of the authority of the moral law, moral feeling is a catalyst to self-criticism and moral self-confidence. It is argued that moral feeling reveals a nonempirical object, one's moral character. In fact, moral feeling plays a representational role that parallels sense experience, but does not derive from (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43. The Philosopher's Child: Critical Perspectives in the Western Tradition.Susan M. Turner & Gareth B. Matthews (eds.) - 1998 - University of Rochester Press.
  44.  9
    A Historical Analysis of Electric Currents in Textbooks: A Century of Influence on Physics Education.Susan M. Stocklmayer & David F. Treagust - 1994 - Science & Education 3 (2):131-154.
  45.  18
    The Good Buddha and the Fierce Spirits: Protecting the Northern Thai Forest.Susan M. Darlington - 2007 - Contemporary Buddhism 8 (2):169-185.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46.  19
    Medical Humanities and Cultural Studies: Lessons Learned From an NEH Institute. [REVIEW]Susan M. Squier & Anne Hunsaker Hawkins - 2004 - Journal of Medical Humanities 25 (4):243-253.
    In this essay, the directors of an NEH Institute on “Medicine, Literature, and Culture” consider the lessons they learned by bringing humanities scholars to a teaching hospital for a month-long institute that mingled seminar discussions, outside speakers and clinical observations. In an exchange of letters, they discuss the productive tensions inherent in approaching medicine from multiple perspectives, and they argue the case for a broader conception of medical humanities that incorporates the methodologies of cultural studies.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47.  16
    Beyonde Viande: The Ethics of Faux Flesh, Fake Fur and Thriftshop Leather.Susan M. Turner - 2005 - Between the Species 13 (5):6.
    Moral debate over vegetarianism forms the backdrop to a preliminary consideration of the questions: Is it ethical to produce, sell and eat faux meat? Is it ethical to produce, sell and wear fake animal skin? Is it ethical to sell or wear secondhand or thriftshop genuine animal skin? If vegetarianism is morally required, the question of just what uses of nonhuman animals are ethical or unethical and on what grounds is always on tap. In this piece, I examine the above (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48.  1
    Clinical, Ethical, and Legal Issues in Using Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis to Create a Stem Cell Donor.Susan M. Wolf, Jeffrey P. Kahn & John E. Wagner - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (3):327-39.
    Successful preimplantation genetic diagnosis to avoid creating a child affected by a genetically-based disorder was reported in 1989. Since then PGD has been used to biopsy and analyze embryos created through in viuo fertilization to avoid transferring to the mother’s uterus an embryo affected by a mutation or chromosomal abnormality associated with serious illness. PGD to avoid serious and early-onset illness in the child-to-be is widely accepted. PGD prevents gestation of an affected embryo and reduces the chance that the parents (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49.  12
    The Processing of Auditory and Visual Recognition of Self-Stimuli.Susan M. Hughes & Shevon E. Nicholson - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):1124-1134.
    This study examined self-recognition processing in both the auditory and visual modalities by determining how comparable hearing a recording of one’s own voice was to seeing photograph of one’s own face. We also investigated whether the simultaneous presentation of auditory and visual self-stimuli would either facilitate or inhibit self-identification. Ninety-one participants completed reaction-time tasks of self-recognition when presented with their own faces, own voices, and combinations of the two. Reaction time and errors made when responding with both the right and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  50.  21
    Psychological and Social Risks of Behavioral Research.Susan M. Labott & Timothy P. Johnson - forthcoming - IRB: Ethics & Human Research.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 999