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  1.  24
    Public Passages, Personal Passages, and Reluctant Passages: Notes on Investigating Cancer Disclosure Practices in Japan.Susan Orpett Long - 2000 - Journal of Medical Humanities 21 (1):3-13.
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  2.  42
    Life is More Than a Survey: Understanding Attitudes Toward Euthanasia in Japan.Susan Orpett Long - 2002 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (4-5):305-319.
    Empirical studies in bioethics, as well asclinical experience, demonstrate the existenceof inter- and intra-cultural diversity invalues and perspectives on end-of-life issues. This paper argues that while survey researchcan describe such diversity, explaining itrequires ethnographic methodology that allowsordinary people to frame the discussion intheir own terms. This study of attitudestoward euthanasia in Japan found that peopleface conflicts between deeply held values suchas life versus pain, self versus other, andburden versus self-reliance that make itdifficult to rely on a ``rational person''''approach to decision-making. (...)
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  3.  30
    Ancestors, Computers, and Other Mixed Messages: Ambiguity and Euthanasia in Japan.Susan Orpett Long - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (1):62-71.
    Ethical questions about end-of-life treatment present themselves at two levels. In clinical situations, patients, families, and healthcare workers sift through ambivalent feelings and conflicting values as they try to resolve questions in particular circumstances. In a very different way, at the societal level, policy makers, lawyers, and bioethicists attempt to determine the best policies and laws to regulate practices about which there are a variety of deeply held beliefs. In the United States we have tried a number of ways to (...)
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  4.  7
    Living Poorly or Dying Well: Cultural Decisions About Life-Supporting Treatment for American and Japanese Patients.Susan Orpett Long - 2000 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 11 (3):236.
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