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  1.  45
    Does the Autistic Child Have a Metarepresentational Deficit?Susan R. Leekam & Josef Perner - 1991 - Cognition 40 (3):203-218.
  2.  49
    Misrepresentation and Referential Confusion: Children's Difficulty with False Beliefs and Outdated Photographs.Josef Perner, Susan R. Leekam, Deborah Myers, Shalini Davis & Nicola Odgers - manuscript
    Three and 4-year-old children were tested on matched versions of Zaitchik's (1990) photo task and Wimmer and Perner's (1983) false belief task. Although replicating Zaitchik's finding that false belief and photo task are of equal difficulty, this applied only to mean performance across subjects and no substantial correlation between the two tasks was found. This suggests that the two tasks tap different intellectual abilities. It was further discovered that children's performance can be improved by drawing their attention to the back (...)
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  3.  7
    Challenges to the Social Motivation Theory of Autism: The Dangers of Counteracting an Imprecise Theory with Even More Imprecision.Mirko Uljarević, Giacomo Vivanti, Susan R. Leekam & Antonio Y. Hardan - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    The arguments offered by Jaswal & Akhtar to counter the social motivation theory do not appear to be directly related to the SMT tenets and predictions, seem to not be empirically testable, and are inconsistent with empirical evidence. To evaluate the merits and shortcomings of the SMT and identify scientifically testable alternatives, advances are needed on the conceptualization and operationalization of social motivation across diagnostic boundaries.
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  4.  19
    Reconstructing Children's Understanding of Mind: Reflections From the Study of Atypical Development.Susan R. Leekam - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):113-114.
    Carpendale & Lewis's theoretical reconstruction of the “theory of mind” problem offers new hope but still has far to go. The study of atypical development may provide some useful insights for dealing with the work ahead. In particular I discuss three issues – the boundary problem, the question of end states, and the issue of the centrality of triadic interaction.
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