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Susan C. Selner-Wright [5]Susan Selner-Wright [2]
  1.  33
    Happiness and the Limits of Satisfaction.Susan C. Selner-Wright - 1997 - Review of Metaphysics 51 (1):159-160.
    This book is for any among us who has ever had a discussion that turned on the subject of “happiness” which went nowhere, or nowhere good, because the word “happiness” itself has become so ambiguous that it seems at times to have lost any common meaning. Deal Hudson here clearly articulates the range of meaning packed into the word, by contrasting happiness and satisfaction, well-being and well-feeling, objective eudaimonism and the view that any subjective profession of happiness is unimpeachable. Since (...)
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  2.  25
    Thomas Aquinas and the Metaphysical Inconsistency.Susan C. Selner-Wright - 1995 - Modern Schoolman 72 (4):323-336.
  3.  37
    Thomas Aquinas on the Acts of Creation and Procreation.Susan C. Selner-Wright - 2003 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 3 (4):707-716.
  4.  54
    The Order of Charity in Thomas Aquinas.Susan C. Selner-Wright - 1995 - Philosophy and Theology 9 (1/2):13-27.
    Thomas articulates the proper priority among charity’s objects based on his understanding of charity as rooted in the fellowship of eternal happiness. God, as the source of the happiness, is our principal “fellow” in it and so first in the order of charity. The individual’s fellowship with himself or herself, with the “inner man,” is most intimate, and so the individual comes next in the order. Then come our neighbors, all of whom are our fellows now and may be our (...)
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  5.  11
    Vocational Call.Terrence Wright & Susan Selner-Wright - 2010 - International Philosophical Quarterly 50 (3):323-334.
    The focus of this paper is the experience of vocational call and, in particular, three of its aspects: the source of the call, the form of the call, and the content of the call. It begins with a short reflection on Biblical accounts of vocation and then briefly contrasts that picture with the contemporary understanding of vocation as it is reflected in the thinking of Dewey, Weber, and Heidegger. It then explores Pope John Paul II’s creative retrieval of the original (...)
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