Results for 'Susan Staiger Gooding'

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  1.  12
    Genetic Research Involving Human Biological Materials: A Need to Tailor Current Consent Forms.Sara Chandros Hull, Holly Gooding, Alison P. Klein, Esther Warshauer-Baker, Susan Metosky & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2004 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 26 (3):1.
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  2.  9
    How Should Assent to Research Be Sought in Low Income Settings? Perspectives From Parents and Children in Southern Malawi.Helen Mangochi, Kate Gooding, Aisleen Bennett, Michael Parker, Nicola Desmond & Susan Bull - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):32.
    Paediatric research in low-income countries is essential to tackle high childhood mortality. As with all research, consent is an essential part of ethical practice for paediatric studies. Ethics guidelines recommend that parents or another proxy provide legal consent for children to participate, but that children should be involved in the decision through providing assent. However, there remain uncertainties about how to judge when children are ready to give assent and about appropriate assent processes. Malawi does not yet have detailed guidelines (...)
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  3.  3
    “Are We Getting the Biometric Bioethics Right?” – the Use of Biometrics Within the Healthcare System in Malawi.Mphatso Mwapasa, Kate Gooding, Moses Kumwenda, Marriott Nliwasa, Kruger Kaswaswa, Rodrick Sambakunsi, Michael Parker, Susan Bull & Nicola Desmond - 2020 - Global Bioethics 31 (1):67-80.
    Biometrics is the science of establishing the identity of an individual based on their physical attributes. Ethical concerns surrounding the appropriate use of biometrics have been raised, especial...
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  4. I—Susan James: Creating Rational Understanding: Spinoza as a Social Epistemologist.Susan James - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):181-199.
    Does Spinoza present philosophy as the preserve of an elite, while condemning the uneducated to a false though palliative form of ‘true religion’? Some commentators have thought so, but this contribution aims to show that they are mistaken. The form of religious life that Spinoza recommends creates the political and epistemological conditions for a gradual transition to philosophical understanding, so that true religion and philosophy are in practice inseparable.
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  5. Luck and Equality: Susan Hurley.Susan Hurley - 2001 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75 (1):51–72.
    [ Susan Hurley] I argue that the aim to neutralize the influence of luck on distribution cannot provide a basis for egalitarianism: it can neither specify nor justify an egalitarian distribution. Luck and responsibility can play a role in determining what justice requires to be redistributed, but from this we cannot derive how to distribute: we cannot derive a pattern of distribution from the 'currency' of distributive justice. I argue that the contrary view faces a dilemma, according to whether (...)
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  6. The Uses of Experiment: Studies in the Natural Sciences.David Gooding, Trevor Pinch & Simon Schaffer - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
    Contributors; Preface; Introduction; Part I. Instruments in Experiments: 1. Scientific instruments: models of brass and aids to discovery; 2. Glass works: Newton’s prisms and the uses of experiment; 3. A viol of water or a wedge of glass; Part II. Experiment and Argument: 4. Galileo’s experimental discourse; 5. Fresnel, Poisson and the white spot: the role of successful predictions in the acceptance of scientific theories; 6. The rhetoric of experiment; Part III. Representing and Realising: 7. ’Magnetic curves’ and the magnetic (...)
     
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  7.  19
    Susan Dodds' Reply.Susan Dodds - 2002 - Monash Bioethics Review 21 (3):S43-S48.
    In Australia, Human Research Ethics Committees have a vital role to play—as the primary institutional mechanism for ethical review of research—in protecting research participants, and promoting ethical research. Their ability to act effectively in this role is currently threatened by the limited support they receive and their burgeoning workloads. In this discussion paper, I trace some of the factors contributing to what I describe as a resource crisis in human research ethics. I suggest a review of the working of HRECs (...)
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  8.  8
    On Partial Randomness.Cristian S. Calude, Ludwig Staiger & Sebastiaan A. Terwijn - 2006 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 138 (1):20-30.
    If is a random sequence, then the sequence is clearly not random; however, seems to be “about half random”. L. Staiger [Kolmogorov complexity and Hausdorff dimension, Inform. and Comput. 103 159–194 and A tight upper bound on Kolmogorov complexity and uniformly optimal prediction, Theory Comput. Syst. 31 215–229] and K. Tadaki [A generalisation of Chaitin’s halting probability Ω and halting self-similar sets, Hokkaido Math. J. 31 219–253] have studied the degree of randomness of sequences or reals by measuring their (...)
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  9.  84
    What is Experimental about Thought Experiments?David C. Gooding - 1992 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:280 - 290.
    I argue that thought experiments are a form of experimental reasoning similar to real experiments. They require the same ability to participate by following a narrative as real experiments do. Participation depends in turn on using what we already know to visualize, manipulate and understand what is unfamiliar or problematic. I defend the claim that visualization requires embodiment by an example which shows how tacit understanding of the properties of represented objects and relations enables us to work out how such (...)
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  10.  1
    Empiricism in Practice: Teleology, Economy, and Observation in Faraday's Physics.David Gooding - 1982 - Isis 73:46-67.
  11.  25
    Susan," Local, Global, Regional: Women's Studies in Australia".Susan& Sheridan Magarey - 2002 - Feminist Studies 28:1.
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  12.  71
    Visualizing Scientific Inference.David C. Gooding - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (1):15-35.
  13. Modelling Experiments as Mediating Models.D. C. Gooding & T. R. Addis - 2008 - Foundations of Science 13 (1):17-35.
    Syntactic and structural models specify relationships between their constituents but cannot show what outcomes their interaction would produce over time in the world. Simulation consists in iterating the states of a model, so as to produce behaviour over a period of simulated time. Iteration enables us to trace the implications and outcomes of inference rules and other assumptions implemented in the models that make up a theory. We apply this method to experiments which we treat as models of the particular (...)
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  14.  18
    Luck And Equality: Susan Hurley.Susan Hurley - 2001 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 75 (1):51-72.
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  15.  87
    Imaginary Science. [REVIEW]David Gooding - 1994 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (4):1029-1045.
  16.  36
    XIII. Passion and Politics1: Susan James.Susan James - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:221-234.
    The sudden resurgence of interest in the emotions that has recently overtaken analytical philosophy has raised a range of questions about the place of the passions in established explanatory schemes. How, for example, do the emotions fit into theories of action organized around beliefs and desires? How can they be included in analyses of the mind developed to account for other mental states and capacities? Questions of this general form also arise within political philosophy, and the wish to acknowledge their (...)
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  17.  34
    How Do Scientists Reach Agreement About Novel Observations?David Gooding - 1986 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 17 (2):205.
    I outline a pragmatic view of scientists' use of observation which draws attention to non-discursive, instrumental and social contexts of observation, in order to explain scientists' agreement about the appearance and significance of new phenomena. I argue that: observation is embedded in a network of activities, techniques, and interests; that experimentalists make construals of new phenomena which enable them communicate exploratory techniques and their outcomes, and that empirical enquiry consists of communicative, exploratory and predictive strategies whose interdependence ensures that, notwithstanding (...)
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  18.  57
    Race, Multiculturalism and Democracy.Robert Gooding‐Wiliams - 1998 - Constellations 5 (1):18-41.
  19. Look, a Negro!: Philosophical Essays on Race, Culture, and Politics.Robert Gooding-Williams - 2005 - Routledge.
    First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
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  20.  11
    Empiricism in Practice: Teleology, Economy, and Observation in Faraday's Physics.David Gooding - 1982 - Isis 73 (1):46-67.
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  21. The Procedural Turn; or, Why Do Thought Experiments Work?David Gooding - 1992 - In R. Giere & H. Feigl (eds.), Cognitive Models of Science. University of Minnesota Press. pp. 45-76.
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  22.  22
    Keeping Faith: Philosophy and Race in America.Robert Gooding-Williams - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (4):601.
    This volume brings together a wide-ranging collection of seventeen essays, most of which were published elsewhere during the last ten or so years and some of which appear here in revised versions. Its subtitle is somewhat misleading, because Keeping Faith is neither a sustained philosophical discussion of American racial identities nor an extended argument to the effect that some noteworthy assumptions about race have helped to shape the history of American philosophical thought. Still, many of the book’s chapters explicitly engage (...)
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  23.  45
    From Phenomenology to Field Theory: Faraday's Visual Reasoning.David C. Gooding - 2006 - Perspectives on Science 14 (1):40-65.
    : Faraday is often described as an experimentalist, but his work is a dialectical interplay of concrete objects, visual images, abstract, theoretically-informed visual models and metaphysical precepts. From phenomena described in terms of patterns formed by lines of force he created a general explanation of space-filling systems of force which obey both empirical laws and principles of conservation and economy. I argue that Faraday's articulation of situated experience via visual models into a theory capable of verbal expression owed much to (...)
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  24.  7
    Zarathustra's Dionysian Modernism.Robert Gooding-Williams - 2007 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 34 (1):61-78.
  25.  10
    Cognition, Construction and Culture: Visual Theories in the Sciences.David Gooding - 2004 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 4 (3-4):551-593.
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  26.  91
    Speech, Harm, and the Mind-Body Problem in First Amendment Jurisprudence: Susan J. Brison.Susan J. Brison - 1998 - Legal Theory 4 (1):39-61.
    “Sucks and stones will break my bones,” Justice Scalia pronounced from the bench in oral arguments in Schenck v. Pro-Choice Network, “but words can never hurt me. That's the First Amendment,” he added. Jay Alan Sekulow, the lawyer for the petitioners, anti-abortion protesters who had been enjoined from moving closer than fifteen feet away from those entering an abortion facility, was obviously pleased by this characterization of the right to free speech, replying, “That's certainly our position on it, and that (...)
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  27.  59
    Visual Cognition: Where Cognition and Culture Meet.David C. Gooding - 2006 - Philosophy of Science 73 (5):688-698.
    Case studies of diverse scientific fields show how scientists use a range of resources to generate new interpretative models and to establish their plausibility as explanations of a domain. They accomplish this by manipulating imagistic representations in particular ways. I show that scientists in different domains use the same basic transformations. Common features of these transformations indicate that general cognitive strategies of interpretation, simplification, elaboration, and argumentation are at work. Social and historical studies of science emphasize the diversity of local (...)
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  28.  2
    The Association Between Believing in Free Will and Subjective Well-Being Is Confounded by a Sense of Personal Control.Peter L. T. Gooding, Mitchell J. Callan & Gethin Hughes - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  29.  10
    Metaphysics Versus Measurement: The Conversion and Conservation of Force in Faraday's Physics.David Gooding - 1980 - Annals of Science 37 (1):1-29.
    Faraday's concept of force is described by six assumptions. These specify a concept that is quite distinct from ‘mechanical’ conceptions of his contemporaries and interpreters. Analysis of the role of these assumptions clarifies Faraday's weighting of experimental evidence and shows how closely-linked Faraday's chemistry and physics were to his theology. It is argued that Faraday was unable to secularize his concept of force by breaking the ties between his physics and his theology of nature. Examination of his basic assumptions also (...)
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  30. Politics, Racial Solidarity, Exodus!Robert Gooding-Williams - 2004 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (2):118 - 128.
  31. Freedom Within Reason.Susan Wolf - 1990 - Oup Usa.
    In Freedom Within Reason, Susan Wolf charts a course between incompatibilism, or the notion that freedom and responsibility require causal and metaphysical independence from the impersonal forces of nature, and compatibilism, or the notion that people are free and responsible as long as their actions are governed by their desires. Wolf argues that some of the forces which are beyond our control are friends to freedom rather than enemies of it, enabling us to see the world for what it (...)
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  32.  22
    Conceptual and Experimental Bases of Faraday's Denial of Electrostatic Action at a Distance.David Gooding - 1978 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 9 (2):117.
  33. The Origin of Concepts.Susan Carey - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Only human beings have a rich conceptual repertoire with concepts like tort, entropy, Abelian group, mannerism, icon and deconstruction. How have humans constructed these concepts? And once they have been constructed by adults, how do children acquire them? While primarily focusing on the second question, in The Origin of Concepts , Susan Carey shows that the answers to both overlap substantially. Carey begins by characterizing the innate starting point for conceptual development, namely systems of core cognition. Representations of core (...)
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  34.  6
    Review: Imaginary Science. [REVIEW]David Gooding - 1994 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (4):1029 - 1045.
  35.  14
    ‘We Are the Eyes and Ears of Researchers and Community’: Understanding the Role of Community Advisory Groups in Representing Researchers and Communities in Malawi.Deborah Nyirenda, Salla Sariola, Kate Gooding, Mackwellings Phiri, Rodrick Sambakunsi, Elvis Moyo, Chiwoza Bandawe, Bertie Squire & Nicola Desmond - 2018 - Developing World Bioethics 18 (4):420-428.
    Community engagement to protect and empower participating individuals and communities is an ethical requirement in research. There is however limited evidence on effectiveness or relevance of some of the approaches used to improve ethical practice. We conducted a study to understand the rationale, relevance and benefits of community engagement in health research. This paper draws from this wider study and focuses on factors that shaped Community Advisory Group members’ selection processes and functions in Malawi. A qualitative research design was used; (...)
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  36. Literary Fiction as Philosophy: The Case of Nietzsche's Zarathustra.Robert Gooding-Williams - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy 83 (11):667-675.
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  37.  22
    Creative Rationality: Towards an Abductive Model of Scientific Change.David Gooding - 1996 - Philosophica 58.
  38.  16
    How to Be a Good Empiricist. [REVIEW]David Gooding - 1989 - British Journal for the History of Science 22 (4):419-427.
  39.  7
    The Staiger-Heidegger Correspondence.Arthur A. Grugan - 1981 - Man and World 14 (3):291-307.
  40. Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture, and the Body.Susan Bordo - 1993 - University of California Press.
    In this provocative book, Susan Bordo untangles the myths, ideologies, and pathologies of the modern female body. Bordo explores our tortured fascination with food, hunger, desire, and control, and its effects on women's lives.
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  41.  13
    Scientific and Technological Thinking.M. Gorman, R. Tweney, D. Gooding & A. Kincannon (eds.) - 2005 - Erlbaum.
    This book describes empirically ways to analyze and then to effectually utilize cognitive processes to advance discovery and invention in the sciences. It also explains how to teach these principles to students.
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  42.  59
    Philosophy and Feminism: The Case of Susan Bordo.Susan E. Bernick - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (3):188 - 196.
    In this paper I lay out what I take to be the crucial insights in Susan Bordo's "Feminist Skepticism and the 'Maleness' of Philosophy" and point out some additional difficulties with the skeptical position. I call attention to an ambiguity in the nature or content of the "maleness" of philosophy that Bordo identifies. Finally, I point out that, unlike some feminist skeptics, Bordo never loses sight in her work of women's lived experiences.
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  43. Meaning in Life and Why It Matters (Markus Rüther).Susan Wolf - 2011 - Philosophischer Literaturanzeiger 64 (3):308.
    Most people, including philosophers, tend to classify human motives as falling into one of two categories: the egoistic or the altruistic, the self-interested or the moral. According to Susan Wolf, however, much of what motivates us does not comfortably fit into this scheme. Often we act neither for our own sake nor out of duty or an impersonal concern for the world. Rather, we act out of love for objects that we rightly perceive as worthy of love--and it is (...)
     
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  44. Is Multiculturalism Bad for Women?Susan Moller Okin (ed.) - 1999 - Princeton University Press.
    Polygamy, forced marriage, female genital mutilation, punishing women for being raped, differential access for men and women to health care and education, unequal rights of ownership, assembly, and political participation, unequal vulnerability to violence. These practices and conditions are standard in some parts of the world. Do demands for multiculturalism — and certain minority group rights in particular — make them more likely to continue and to spread to liberal democracies? Are there fundamental conflicts between our commitment to gender equity (...)
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  45.  1
    Special Sectio Lorenzo Simpson's the Unfinished Project: Toward a Postmetaphysical Humanism.Robert Gooding-Williams, Robert Bernasconi, Kenneth Baynes, David M. Rasmussen & Lorenzo C. Simpson - 2007 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (3):289-299.
  46.  17
    Thing Knowledge: A Philosophy of Scientific Instruments. [REVIEW]David Gooding - 2006 - British Journal for the History of Science 39 (4):598-599.
  47. Meaning in Life and Why It Matters.Susan Wolf - 2010 - Princeton University Press.
    Most people, including philosophers, tend to classify human motives as falling into one of two categories: the egoistic or the altruistic, the self-interested or the moral. According to Susan Wolf, however, much of what motivates us does not comfortably fit into this scheme. Often we act neither for our own sake nor out of duty or an impersonal concern for the world. Rather, we act out of love for objects that we rightly perceive as worthy of love--and it is (...)
     
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  48.  30
    Zarathustra's Dionysian Modernism.Robert Gooding-Williams - 2001 - Stanford University Press.
    In arguing that Nietzsche's _Thus Spoke Zarathustra_ is a philosophical explanation of the possibility of modernism—that is, of the possibility of radical cultural change through the creation of new values—the author shows that literary fiction can do the work of philosophy. Nietzsche takes up the problem of modernism by inventing Zarathustra, a self-styled cultural innovator who aspires to subvert the culture of modernity by creating new values. By showing how Zarathustra can become a creator of new values, notwithstanding the forces (...)
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  49.  17
    Faraday, Thomson, and the Concept of the Magnetic Field.David Gooding - 1980 - British Journal for the History of Science 13 (2):91-120.
    In June 1849 William Thomson wrote to Michael Faraday suggesting that the concept of a uniform magnetic field could be used to predict the motions of small magnetic and diamagnetic bodies. In his letter Thomson showed how Faraday's lines of magnetic force could represent the effect of the ‘conducting power’ for magnetic force of matter in the region of magnets. This was Thomson's extension to magnetism of an analogy between the mathematical descriptions of the distribution of static electricity and of (...)
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  50.  31
    Theory and Observation: The Experimental Nexus.David Gooding - 1990 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 4 (2):131 – 148.
    Abstract Philosophical discussions of experiment usually focus exclusively on testing predictions. In this paper I compare G. Morpurgo's experimental test of the Gell?Mann/ Zweig quark hypothesis with two neglected uses of experiment: constructing representations of new phenomena and inventing the instruments that produce such phenomena. These roles are illustrated by J. B. Biot's 1821 observations of electromagnetism and by Michael Faraday's invention of the first electromagnetic motor, also in 1821. The comparison identifies similarities between observation and experiment, showing how both (...)
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