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Suzanne Uniacke [40]Suzanne M. Uniacke [2]
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Suzanne Uniacke
Charles Sturt University
  1. Proportionality and Self-Defense.Suzanne Uniacke - 2011 - Law and Philosophy 30 (3):253-272.
    Proportionality is widely accepted as a necessary condition of justified self-defense. What gives rise to this particular condition and what role it plays in the justification of self-defense seldom receive focused critical attention. In this paper I address the standard of proportionality applicable to personal self-defense and the role that proportionality plays in justifying the use of harmful force in self-defense. I argue against an equivalent harm view of proportionality in self-defense, and in favor of a standard of proportionality in (...)
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  2.  9
    Criminalising Unknowing Defence.Suzanne Uniacke - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy:651-664.
    Should a legal plea of self- or third-party defence include an ‘awareness component’ that requires that the actor was aware of the justificatory facts at the time of action? Some theorists argue that in cases of so-called unknowing defence, where an actor in fact averts an otherwise unavoidable danger to himself or another person although unaware at the time of action that this is what he is doing, the objective facts alone should allow a plea of self- or third-party defence. (...)
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  3.  71
    Respect for Autonomy in Medical Ethics.Suzanne Uniacke - 2013 - In David Archard, Monique Deveaux, Neil Manson & Daniel Marc Weinstock (eds.), Reading Onora O'Neill. London: Routledge. pp. 94-110.
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  4. Permissible Killing: The Self-Defence Justification of Homicide.Suzanne Uniacke - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    Do individuals have a positive right of self-defence? And if so, what are the limits of this right? Under what conditions does this use of force extend to the defence of others? These are some of the issues explored by Dr Uniacke in this comprehensive 1994 philosophical discussion of the principles relevant to self-defence as a moral and legal justification of homicide. She establishes a unitary right of self-defence and the defence of others, one which grounds the permissibility of the (...)
     
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  5.  84
    Why is Revenge Wrong?Suzanne Uniacke - 2000 - Journal of Value Inquiry 34 (1):61-69.
  6.  86
    Peter Singer and Non-Voluntary 'Euthanasia': Tripping Down the Slippery Slope.Suzanne Uniacke & H. J. Mccloskey - 1992 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (2):203-219.
    This article discusses the nature of euthanasia, and the way in which redevelopment of the concept of euthanasia in some influential recent philosophical writing has led to morally less discriminating killing/letting die/not saving being misdescribed as euthanasia. Peter Singer's defence of non-voluntary ‘euthanasia’of defective infants in his influential book Practical Ethics is critically evaluated. We argue that Singer's pseudo-euthanasia arguments in Practical Ethics are unsatisfactory as approaches to determining the legitimacy of killing, and that these arguments present a total utilitarian (...)
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  7.  22
    The Value of Applied Philosophy.Suzanne Uniacke - 2016 - In Kimberley Brownlee, David Coady & Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Applied Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    The value of applied philosophy is often taken to consist in its contribution to our understanding of practical issues with which applied philosophy engages and in its contribution to their satisfactory resolution. This chapter examines the relationship between the nature of applied philosophy and its value. It regards the value of applied philosophy as dependent both on its philosophical quality and on its contribution to the understanding and (potential) resolution of practical issues with which it engages. These dual points of (...)
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  8.  69
    Emotional Excuses.Suzanne Uniacke - 2007 - Law and Philosophy 26 (1):95-117.
  9.  79
    A Critique of the Preference Utilitarian Objection to Killing People.Suzanne Uniacke - 2002 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (2):209 – 217.
    Preference utilitarianism is widely considered a significant advance on classical utilitarianism when it comes to explaining why it is wrong to kill people. This paper focuses attention on the nature of the preference utilitarian 'direct' objection to killing a person and on the related claim that a person's preferences are non-replaceable. I argue that the preference utilitarian case against killing people is overstated and overrated. My concluding remarks indicate the relevance of this discussion to deeper issues in normative moral theory.
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  10.  31
    Self-Defence, Just War, and a Reasonable Prospect of Success.Suzanne Uniacke - 2014 - In Helen Frowe & Gerald Lang (eds.), How We Fight. Oxford University Press. pp. 62-74.
    The Just War principle of jus ad bellum explicitly requires a reasonable prospect of success; the prevailing view about personal self-defence is that it can be justified even if the prospect of success is low. This chapter defends the existence of this distinction and goes on to explore the normative basis of this difference between defensive war and self-defence and its implications. In particular, the chapter highlights the rationale of the ‘success condition’ within Just War thinking and argues that this (...)
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  11.  26
    In Defense of Permissible Killing: A Response to Two Critics.Suzanne Uniacke - 2000 - Law and Philosophy 19 (5):627-633.
    Two articles have appeared in Law and Philosophy that provide detailed criticisms of aspects of my account of the justification of individual self-defense. One of these articles misconstrues central aspects of my account. The other raises a less central, but nonetheless an important issue that invites clarification. The criticisms raised in these two articles to which I respond here have important bearing on the nature of the justification of self-defense.
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  12.  28
    Opportunistic Terrorism.Suzanne Uniacke - 2014 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (4):395-410.
    This paper critically addresses two central aspects of Frances Kamm’s account of conceptual and evaluative issues of terrorism in ‘Terrorism and Intending Evil’, Ethics for Enemies (oup 2011), chapter 2. The paper engages with what Kamm says about cases in which an act done from a morally bad intention or motive overtly exactly mimics a justifiable act. I argue that in such a case, an actor’s intention to terrorise is more significant to the question of whether what he or she (...)
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  13.  19
    Rights and Relativistic Justifications: Replies to Kasachkoff and Husak.Suzanne Uniacke - 2000 - Law and Philosophy 19 (5):645-647.
  14.  12
    The Doctrine of Double Effect.Suzanne M. Uniacke - 1984 - The Thomist 48 (2):188-218.
  15. Responsibility and Obligation: Some Kantian Directions.Suzanne M. Uniacke - 2005 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (4):461 – 475.
    This paper asks how we should conceptualize the relationship between responsibility and obligation. Its central concern is the relevance of considerations of obligation to the attribution of responsibility for what we do or bring about. The paper approaches this issue through an examination of Kant's complex, challenging and instructive theory of responsibility, in which strict obligation plays a pivotal role in attributions of responsibility for the outcomes of our actions. Even if we do not accept Kant's strongly juridical concept of (...)
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  16.  8
    The Doctrine of Double Effect and the Ethics of Dual Use.Suzanne Uniacke - 2013 - In Michael Selgelid & Brian Rappert (eds.), On the Dual Uses of Science and Ethics. Canberra: Australian National University Press. pp. 153-163.
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  17.  15
    Was Mary’s Death Murder?Suzanne Uniacke - 2001 - Medical Law Review 9 (3):208-220.
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  18.  5
    The Doctrine of Double Effect.Suzanne Uniacke - 2007 - In Richard Ashcroft (ed.), Principles of Health Care Ethics, second edition. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons. pp. 263-268.
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  19.  4
    On Getting One's Retaliation in First.Suzanne Uniacke - 2007 - In Henry Shue & David Rodin (eds.), Preemption: Military Action and Moral Justification. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter provides a general, philosophical account of the use of harmful force in self-defence as a type of retaliation. It argues that pre-emption — the use of harmful force for prevention — is not an act of self-defence. The associations between the concepts of retaliation, self-defence, and pre-emption are discussed.
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  20.  54
    In Vitro Fertilization and the Right to Reproduce.Suzanne Uniacke - 1987 - Bioethics 1 (3):241–254.
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  21.  36
    Killing Under Duress.Suzanne Uniacke - 1989 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (1):53-70.
    The House of Lords ruled in R v Howe (1987) that Duress is not a defence to murder in English law. Some of the central arguments rested on a simple view about the nature of duress and the way in which duress is relevant in moral evaluation. This paper discusses legal and non-legal senses of duress, and argues that duress can be relevant to moral evaluation in a number of different ways. Some acts under duress are morally justified (here the (...)
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  22. The Limits of Criminality: Kant on the Plank.Suzanne Uniacke - 1996 - In Henry Tam (ed.), Punishment, Excuses and Moral Development. Aldershot: Avebury. pp. 113-126.
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  23. Is Life Sacred?Suzanne Uniacke - 2004 - In Ben Rogers (ed.), Is Nothing Sacred. London: Routledge. pp. 59-80.
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  24. Self-Defence and Just War.Suzanne Uniacke - 2002 - In Dieter Janssen & Michael Quante (eds.), Gerechte Kriege. Paderborn: Mentis-Verlag. pp. 64-78.
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  25.  31
    Punishment as Penalty.Suzanne Uniacke - 2015 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 9 (1):37-47.
    The paper’s central focus is the ‘duty’ theory of punishment developed by Victor Tadros in The Ends of Harm. In evaluating the ‘duty’ theory we might ask two broad closely related questions: whether in its own terms the ‘duty’ theory provides a justification of the imposition of hard treatment or suffering on an offender; and whether the ‘duty’ theory can provide a justification of punishment. This paper is principally concerned with the second question, which stems from a significant difference between (...)
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  26. The Principle of Double Effect.Suzanne Uniacke - 1998 - In Edward Craig (ed.), Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy. London: Routledge. pp. 120-122.
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  27.  9
    Responsibility, Expertise and Trust: Institutional Ethics Committees and Science.Suzanne Uniacke - 2015 - Humana Mente 8 (28):169-185.
    This paper addresses what should be an important question for many institutional ethics committees: How might they justifiably trust external peer review of the scientific merit of research proposals under their consideration, since these committees are typically not constituted to review the science themselves?
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  28.  12
    Self‐Defense.Suzanne Uniacke - 2001 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. New York: Wiley-Blackwell.
    The use of force in self-defense is widely regarded as morally justified. Perhaps for this reason self-defense received only sporadic attention in Western philosophy until relatively recently. In the thirteenth century St. Thomas Aquinas (see Aquinas, Saint Thomas) needed to reconcile permissible self-defense with his view that a private person must not kill intentionally; he sought to do this by distinguishing between intended, as opposed to (merely) foreseen, effects of an action and thus laid the basis of the doctrine of (...)
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  29.  7
    The Proportionality Constraint.Suzanne Uniacke - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (1):38-42.
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  30.  6
    Responsibility : Intention and Consequence.Suzanne Uniacke - 2010 - In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge. pp. 596-606.
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  31.  18
    Absolutely Clean Hands? Responsibility for What's Allowed in Refraining From What's Not Allowed.Suzanne Uniacke - 1999 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 7 (2):189 – 209.
    This paper examines the absolutist grounds for denying an agent's responsibility for what he allows to happen in 'keeping his hands clean' in acute circumstances. In defending an agent's non-prevention of what is, viewed impersonally, the greater harm in such cases, absolutists typically insist on a difference in responsibility between what an agent brings about as opposed to what he allows. This alleged difference is taken to be central to the absolutist justification of non-intervention in acute cases: the agent's obligation (...)
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  32.  5
    In Vitro Fertilization and the Right to Reproduce.Suzanne Uniacke - 1987 - Bioethics 1 (3):241-254.
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  33.  4
    Speech, Crime, and the Uses of Language, by Kent Greenawalt. [REVIEW]Suzanne Uniacke - 1991 - Philosophical Books 32 (4):248-249.
  34. How Shoud We Understand Family-Centred Care?Suzanne Uniacke - 2018 - Journal of Child Health Care 22 (3):460-469.
    What is family-centred care of a hospitalized child? A critical understanding of the concept of family-centred care is necessary if this widely preferred model is to be differentiated from other health care ideals and properly evaluated as appropriate to the care of hospitalized children. The article identifies distinguishable interpretations of family-centred care that can pull health professionals in different, sometimes conflicting directions. Some of these interpretations are not qualitatively different from robust interpretations of the ideals of parental participation, care-by-parent and (...)
     
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  35. Is There a Right to Die?Suzanne Uniacke - 2004 - In Brendan Lavor & Peter Cave (eds.), Thinking About Death. London: British Humanist Association. pp. 22-25.
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  36. Revenge.Suzanne Uniacke - 2001 - In Lawrence C. Becker & Charlotte Becker (eds.), Encyclopedia of Ethics, revised second edition. New York: Routledge. pp. 1492-1494.
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  37. Terrorism.Suzanne Uniacke - 2016 - In Helen Frowe & Seth Lazar (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Ethics of War. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This article explores the connection between terrorism and the ethics of war, specifically the relevance of the moral wrongfulness of terrorism in elucidating one important aspect of the ethics of war. It begins with an overview of terrorism’s central features and the ethical issues associated with terrorism. It then discusses two considerations. First, terrorism can occur within civil society as well as in contexts of armed combat or war. Second, terrorist tactics are answerable to principles that govern ethically acceptable conduct (...)
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  38. The Condition of Last Resort.Suzanne Uniacke - 2018 - In Larry May (ed.), The Cambridge Handbook of the Just War. Cambridge, UK: pp. 98-113.
    Just War theory specifies that recourse to war must be a last resort. This specification accords with a more general aim to limit the occurrence of war by articulating demanding conditions under which war can be morally legitimate. Although it has critics among contemporary Western philosophers, the condition of last resort is widely accepted as a basic element of Just War theory. It is not itself an issue of dispute between historical as opposed to contemporary Just War theorists, or between (...)
     
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  39. What Are Partial Excuses to Murder?Suzanne Uniacke - 1991 - In Stanley Yeo (ed.), Partial Excuses to Murder. Sydney: Federation Press. pp. 1-18.
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