Results for 'Sweeting Ben'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  14
    Design Research as a Variety of Second-Order Cybernetic Practice.Ben Sweeting - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (3):572-579.
    Context: The relationship between design and science has shifted over recent decades. One bridge between the two is cybernetics, which offers perspectives on both in terms of their practice. From around 1980 onwards, drawing on ideas from cybernetics, Glanville has suggested that rather than apply science to design, it makes more sense to understand science as a form of design activity, reversing the more usual hierarchy between the two. I return to review this argument here, in the context of recent (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  75
    Grande Sertão: Veredas by João Guimarães Rosa.Felipe W. Martinez, Nancy Fumero & Ben Segal - 2013 - Continent 3 (1):27-43.
    INTRODUCTION BY NANCY FUMERO What is a translation that stalls comprehension? That, when read, parsed, obfuscates comprehension through any language – English, Portuguese. It is inevitable that readers expect fidelity from translations. That language mirror with a sort of precision that enables the reader to become of another location, condition, to grasp in English in a similar vein as readers of Portuguese might from João Guimarães Rosa’s GRANDE SERTÃO: VEREDAS. There is the expectation that translations enable mobility. That what was (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  20
    Understanding Design From a Second-Order Cybernetics Perspective: Is There a Place for Material Agency?D. Griffiths - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (3):581-583.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Design Research as a Variety of Second-Order Cybernetic Practice” by Ben Sweeting. Upshot: This commentary supports Sweeting’s case for the relationship between the design tradition, second-order cybernetics and second-order science. It argues, however, that the extension of this argument to other intellectual traditions and areas of practice is complicated by differing views of material agency.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  10
    What Can Cybernetics Learn From Design?C. M. Herr - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (3):583-585.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Design Research as a Variety of Second-Order Cybernetic Practice” by Ben Sweeting. Upshot: Based on Sweeting’s central question of what design can bring to cybernetics, this commentary extends and adds further depth to the target article. Aspects discussed include the nature of practice in relation to design, the introduction of designerly ways of acting and thinking through acting to cybernetics, and the re-introduction of material experimentation typical of early cybernetics.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  14
    Rigor in Research, Honesty and Values.M. Hohl - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (3):585-586.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Design Research as a Variety of Second-Order Cybernetic Practice” by Ben Sweeting. Upshot: I reflect on the theme of honesty in research and discuss the adjoining requirements of rigor from an academic perspective. Central to my discussion is Glanville’s assertion that what researchers - from either science or design - presented was not what they actually thought and did.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  17
    Digital Design Research and Second-Order Cybernetics.M. de Sousa van Stralen - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (3):586-587.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Design Research as a Variety of Second-Order Cybernetic Practice” by Ben Sweeting. Upshot: I claim that the parallels between design research, second-order cybernetics and second-order science, as discussed by Sweeting in the target article, are more explicit in digital design. The discussion of SOC and SOS can point towards the creation of an epistemological foundation to digital design, where self-reflexivity and the inclusion of the observer are central questions.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  20
    Cybernetics Is the Answer, but What Was the Conversation About?J. dos Santos Cabral Filho - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (3):587-589.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Design Research as a Variety of Second-Order Cybernetic Practice” by Ben Sweeting. Upshot: It is suggested that the main arguments of the target article could be constructed in an easier way and would become even more compelling if a radical consideration of the systemic nature of design were taken into account.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  14
    Design Research in the Age of Neuroscience: The Value of the Second-Order Cybernetic Practice Perspective.A. Jelić - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (3):589-590.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Design Research as a Variety of Second-Order Cybernetic Practice” by Ben Sweeting. Upshot: This commentary highlights the relevance of understanding design research as a variety of second-order cybernetic practice. It does so by illustrating possible contributions of this view to several concrete issues surrounding the introduction of neuroscientific framework to architectural design. Based on the implications of Sweeting’s article, I suggest that the specific case of an interdisciplinary dialogue between architecture and cognitive (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  11
    Design Cycles: Conversing with Lawrence Halprin.T. Scholte - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (3):579-581.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Design Research as a Variety of Second-Order Cybernetic Practice” by Ben Sweeting. Upshot: This commentary adds environmental architect Lawrence Halprin to Sweeting’s list of examples of design research as second-order cybernetic practice.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  37
    J. S. Mill's Conception of Utility: Ben Saunders.Ben Saunders - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (1):52-69.
    Mill's most famous departure from Bentham is his distinction between higher and lower pleasures. This article argues that quality and quantity are independent and irreducible properties of pleasures that may be traded off against each other – as in the case of quality and quantity of wine. I argue that Mill is not committed to thinking that there are two distinct kinds of pleasure, or that ‘higher pleasures’ lexically dominate lower ones, and that the distinction is compatible with hedonism. I (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  11. Does Participation Matter? An Inconsistency in Parfit's Moral Mathematics: Ben Eggleston.Ben Eggleston - 2003 - Utilitas 15 (1):92-105.
    Consequentialists typically think that the moral quality of one's conduct depends on the difference one makes. But consequentialists may also think that even if one is not making a difference, the moral quality of one's conduct can still be affected by whether one is participating in an endeavour that does make a difference. Derek Parfit discusses this issue – the moral significance of what I call ‘participation’ – in the chapter of Reasons and Persons that he devotes to what he (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12. Sweet Dreams: Philosophical Obstacles to a Science of Consciousness.Daniel C. Dennett - 2005 - MIT Press.
    In the final essay, the "intrinsic" nature of "qualia" is compared with the naively imagined "intrinsic value" of a dollar in ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   94 citations  
  13.  34
    Interview: Ben Cohen.Ben Cohen & Craig Cox - 1994 - Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 8 (5):18-21.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Ben Abadiano Photographs.Ben Abadiano - 2008 - Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 12 (2).
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Liu Ben Wen Ji.Ben Liu - 2008 - Zhongguo She Hui Ke Xue Chu Ban She.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Well-Being and Death.Ben Bradley - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Well-Being and Death addresses philosophical questions about death and the good life: what makes a life go well? Is death bad for the one who dies? How is this possible if we go out of existence when we die? Is it worse to die as an infant or as a young adult? Is it bad for animals and fetuses to die? Can the dead be harmed? Is there any way to make death less bad for us? Ben Bradley defends the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   123 citations  
  17.  2
    Sweet Spot Identification Through Seismic Inversion and Multiattribute Transform: A Case Study of the Niobrara and Codell Unconventionals.Sheila Harryandi & Ali Tura - 2019 - Interpretation 7 (4):T887-T898.
    The Niobrara and Codell unconventional tight reservoir play at the Wattenberg field, Colorado, has potentially two billion barrels of oil equivalent, requiring hundreds of wells to access this resource. Due to the formations’ high heterogeneity and variable thicknesses, we model the facies at the well-bore scale and upscale it to the seismic scale to guide the development strategy and evaluate future exploration targets. A facies classification from well data supervises the prestack seismic inversion and multiattribute transformation workflows to build a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18. Thinking, Guessing, and Believing.Ben Holguín - forthcoming - Philosophers' Imprint:1-34.
    This paper defends the view, put roughly, that to think that p is to guess that p is the answer to the question at hand, and that to think that p rationally is for one’s guess to that question to be in a certain sense non-arbitrary. Some theses that will be argued for along the way include: that thinking is question-sensitive and, correspondingly, that ‘thinks’ is context-sensitive; that it can be rational to think that p while having arbitrarily low credence (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19. The Shifting Border Between Perception and Cognition.Ben Phillips - 2019 - Noûs 53 (2):316-346.
    The distinction between perception and cognition has always had a firm footing in both cognitive science and folk psychology. However, there is little agreement as to how the distinction should be drawn. In fact, a number of theorists have recently argued that, given the ubiquity of top-down influences, we should jettison the distinction altogether. I reject this approach, and defend a pluralist account of the distinction. At the heart of my account is the claim that each legitimate way of marking (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  20.  43
    The Sweetness of Surrender: Glucose Enhances Self-Control by Signaling Environmental Richness.Neil Levy - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (6):813-825.
    According to the ego-depletion account of loss of self-control, self-control is, or depends on, a depletable resource. Advocates of this account have argued that what is depleted is actually glucose. However, there is experimental evidence that indicates that glucose replenishment is not necessary for regaining self-control, as well as theoretical reasons for thinking that it is not depleted by exercises of self-control. I suggest that glucose restores self-control not because it is a resource on which it relies, but because it (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  21.  26
    Sweet Tension and its Phenomenological Description: Sport, Intersubjectivity and Horizon.Douglas W. McLaughlin & Cesar R. Torres - 2011 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (3):270 - 284.
    In this paper, we argue that a rich phenomenological description of ?sweet tension? is an important step to understanding how and why sport is a meaningful human endeavour. We introduce the phenomenological concepts of intersubjectivity and horizon and elaborate how they inform the study and understanding of human experience. In the process, we establish that intersubjectivity is always embodied, developing and ethically committed. Likewise, we establish that our horizons are experienced from an embodied, developing and ethically committed perspective that serves (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  22.  19
    Aesopica. A Series of Texts Relating to Aesop or Ascribed to Him or Closely Connected with the Literary Tradition That Bears His Name, Collected and Critically Edited with a Commentary and Historical Essay by Ben Edwin Perry. Volume I: Greek and Latin Texts. Pp. Xxiii + 765. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1952. Cloth, $15. [REVIEW]H. Ll Hudson-Williams & Ben Edwin Perry - 1953 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 73:163-163.
  23. Conscientious Objection in Medicine: Making it Public.Nir Ben-Moshe - 2021 - HEC Forum 33 (3):269-289.
    The literature on conscientious objection in medicine presents two key problems that remain unresolved: Which conscientious objections in medicine are justified, if it is not feasible for individual medical practitioners to conclusively demonstrate the genuineness or reasonableness of their objections? How does one respect both medical practitioners’ claims of conscience and patients’ interests, without leaving practitioners complicit in perceived or actual wrongdoing? My aim in this paper is to offer a new framework for conscientious objections in medicine, which, by bringing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24. The Distinctive Feeling Theory of Pleasure.Ben Bramble - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 162 (2):201-217.
    In this article, I attempt to resuscitate the perennially unfashionable distinctive feeling theory of pleasure (and pain), according to which for an experience to be pleasant (or unpleasant) is just for it to involve or contain a distinctive kind of feeling. I do this in two ways. First, by offering powerful new arguments against its two chief rivals: attitude theories, on the one hand, and the phenomenological theories of Roger Crisp, Shelly Kagan, and Aaron Smuts, on the other. Second, by (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   65 citations  
  25.  39
    Sweet Little Lies: Social Context and the Use of Deception in Negotiation.Mara Olekalns, Carol T. Kulik & Lin Chew - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (1):13-26.
    Social context shapes negotiators’ actions, including their willingness to act unethically. We use a simulated negotiation to test how three dimensions of social context—dyadic gender composition, negotiation strategy, and trust—interact to influence one micro-ethical decision, the use of deception. Deception in all-male dyads was relatively unaffected by trust or the other negotiator’s strategy. In mixed-sex dyads, negotiators consistently increased their use of deception when three forms of trust were low and opponents used an accommodating strategy. However, in all-female dyads, negotiators (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  26.  71
    Social Capital Versus Social Theory: Political Economy and Social Science at the Turn of the Millennium.Ben Fine - 2001 - Routledge.
    Ben Fine traces the origins of social capital through the work of Becker, Bourdieu and Coleman and comprehensively reviews the literature across the social sciences. The text is uniquely critical of social capital, explaining how it avoids a proper confrontation with political economy and has become chaotic. This highly topical text addresses some major themes, including the shifting relationship between economics and other social sciences, the 'publish or perish' concept currently burdening scholarly integrity, and how a social science interdisciplinarity requires (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  27. The Way Things Were.Ben Caplan & David Sanson - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (1):24-39.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   62 citations  
  28. Putting Things in Contexts.Ben Caplan - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (2):191-214.
    Thanks to David Kaplan (1989a, 1989b), we all know how to handle indexicals like ‘I’. ‘I’ doesn’t refer to an object simpliciter; rather, it refers to an object only relative to a context. In particular, relative to a context C, ‘I’ refers to the agent of C. Since different contexts can have different agents, ‘I’ can refer to different objects relative to different contexts. For example, relative to a context cwhose agent is Gottlob Frege, ‘I’ refers to Frege; relative to (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  29. A New Defense of Hedonism About Well-Being.Ben Bramble - 2016 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 3.
    According to hedonism about well-being, lives can go well or poorly for us just in virtue of our ability to feel pleasure and pain. Hedonism has had many advocates historically, but has relatively few nowadays. This is mainly due to three highly influential objections to it: The Philosophy of Swine, The Experience Machine, and The Resonance Constraint. In this paper, I attempt to revive hedonism. I begin by giving a precise new definition of it. I then argue that the right (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  30. Knowledge in the Face of Conspiracy Conditionals.Ben Holguín - 2020 - Linguistics and Philosophy 44 (3):737-771.
    A plausible principle about the felicitous use of indicative conditionals says that there is something strange about asserting an indicative conditional when you know whether its antecedent is true. But in most contexts there is nothing strange at all about asserting indicative conditionals like ‘If Oswald didn’t shoot Kennedy, then someone else did’. This paper argues that the only compelling explanation of these facts requires the resources of contextualism about knowledge.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31.  43
    Knowledge by Constraint.Ben Holguín - forthcoming - Philosophical Perspectives:1-28.
    This paper considers some puzzling knowledge ascriptions and argues that they present prima facie counterexamples to credence, belief, and justification conditions on knowledge, as well as to many of the standard meta-semantic assumptions about the context-sensitivity of ‘know’. It argues that these ascriptions provide new evidence in favor of contextualist theories of knowledge—in particular those that take the interpretation of ‘know’ to be sensitive to the mechanisms of constraint.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  31
    Philosophy and the Public Sphere: Kant on Moral Education and Political Critique.Kristi Sweet - 2011 - Idealistic Studies 41 (1-2):83-94.
    Kant’s elevation of practical reason to a position of primacy in relation to theoretical reason is certainly well known. With this, though, comes also a new articulation of what the task of philosophy is. This paper addresses how Kant thinks that philosophy must actively promote and work to bring about the essential ends of human life, namely, moral goodness and a just society. This means that philosophers must direct the use of their reason to the public sphere. In this, the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  33. Doing Away with Harm.Ben Bradley - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (2):390-412.
    I argue that extant accounts of harm all fail to account for important desiderata, and that we should therefore jettison the concept when doing moral philosophy.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  34. The Roots of Racial Categorization.Ben Phillips - forthcoming - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-25.
    I examine the origins of ordinary racial thinking. In doing so, I argue against the thesis that it is the byproduct of a unique module (e.g. a folk-biology module). Instead, I defend a pluralistic thesis according to which different forms of racial thinking are driven by distinct mechanisms, each with their own etiology. I begin with the belief that visible features are diagnostic of race. I argue that the mechanisms responsible for face recognition have an important, albeit delimited, role to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  56
    Solidarity and Responsibility in Health Care.Ben Davies & Julian Savulescu - 2019 - Public Health Ethics 12 (2):133-144.
    Some healthcare systems are said to be grounded in solidarity because healthcare is funded as a form of mutual support. This article argues that health care systems that are grounded in solidarity have the right to penalise some users who are responsible for their poor health. This derives from the fact that solidary systems involve both rights and obligations and, in some cases, those who avoidably incur health burdens violate obligations of solidarity. Penalties warranted include direct patient contribution to costs, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  36. Evolutionary Debunking Arguments and the Reliability of Moral Cognition.Ben Fraser - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 168 (2):457-473.
    Recent debate in metaethics over evolutionary debunking arguments against morality has shown a tendency to abstract away from relevant empirical detail. Here, I engage the debate about Darwinian debunking of morality with relevant empirical issues. I present four conditions that must be met in order for it to be reasonable to expect an evolved cognitive faculty to be reliable: the environment, information, error, and tracking conditions. I then argue that these conditions are not met in the case of our evolved (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  37. Consequentialism About Meaning in Life.Ben Bramble - 2015 - Utilitas 27 (4):445-459.
    What is it for a life to be meaningful? In this article, I defend what I call Consequentialism about Meaning in Life, the view that one's life is meaningful at time t just in case one's surviving at t would be good in some way, and one's life was meaningful considered as a whole just in case the world was made better in some way for one's having existed.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  38. Presentism and Truthmaking.Ben Caplan & David Sanson - 2011 - Philosophy Compass 6 (3):196-208.
    Three plausible views—Presentism, Truthmaking, and Independence—form an inconsistent triad. By Presentism, all being is present being. By Truthmaking, all truth supervenes on, and is explained in terms of, being. By Independence, some past truths do not supervene on, or are not explained in terms of, present being. We survey and assess some responses to this.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  39.  20
    Measuring ‘Virtue’ in Medicine.Ben Kotzee & Agnieszka Ignatowicz - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (2):149-161.
    Virtue-approaches to medical ethics are becoming ever more influential. Virtue theorists advocate redefining right or good action in medicine in terms of the character of the doctor performing the action. In medical education, too, calls are growing to reconceive medical education as a form of character formation. Empirical studies of doctors’ ethics from a virtue-perspective, however, are few and far between. In this respect, theoretical and empirical study of medical ethics are out of alignment. In this paper, we survey the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  40.  26
    Sweet & Sour and Other Flavours of Ccc Forcing Notions.Andrzej Rosłanowski & Saharon Shelah - 2004 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 43 (5):583-663.
    We continue developing the general theory of forcing notions built with the use of norms on possibilities, this time concentrating on ccc forcing notions and classifying them.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  41. The Experience Machine.Ben Bramble - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (3):136-145.
    In this paper, I reconstruct Robert Nozick's experience machine objection to hedonism about well-being. I then explain and briefly discuss the most important recent criticisms that have been made of it. Finally, I question the conventional wisdom that the experience machine, while it neatly disposes of hedonism, poses no problem for desire-based theories of well-being.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  42. Entitativity and Implicit Measures of Social Cognition.Ben Phillips - forthcoming - Mind and Language.
    I argue that in addressing worries about the validity and reliability of implicit measures of social cognition, theorists should draw on research concerning “entitativity perception.” In brief, an aggregate of people is perceived as highly “entitative” when its members exhibit a certain sort of unity. For example, think of the difference between the aggregate of people waiting in line at a bank versus a tight-knit group of friends: the latter seems more “groupy” than the former. I start by arguing that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43. Against Satisficing Consequentialism.Ben Bradley - 2006 - Utilitas 18 (2):97-108.
    The move to satisficing has been thought to help consequentialists avoid the problem of demandingness. But this is a mistake. In this article I formulate several versions of satisficing consequentialism. I show that every version is unacceptable, because every version permits agents to bring about a submaximal outcome in order to prevent a better outcome from obtaining. Some satisficers try to avoid this problem by incorporating a notion of personal sacrifice into the view. I show that these attempts are unsuccessful. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations  
  44. When is Death Bad for the One Who Dies?Ben Bradley - 2004 - Noûs 38 (1):1–28.
    Epicurus seems to have thought that death is not bad for the one who dies, since its badness cannot be located in time. I show that Epicurus’ argument presupposes Presentism, and I argue that death is bad for its victim at all and only those times when the person would have been living a life worth living had she not died when she did. I argue that my account is superior to competing accounts given by Thomas Nagel, Fred Feldman and (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   48 citations  
  45.  71
    Doing Away with Harm1.Ben Bradley - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (2):390-412.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  46.  47
    Sweet Necessities: Food, Sex, and Saint Augustine.Gilbert Meilaender - 2001 - Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (1):3 - 18.
    Central to Augustine's understanding of rightly ordered sexuality is his belief that the pleasure of the act should not be separated from its good (procreation). It is useful to observe that he reasons in a similar way about eating: that the pleasure of eating should not be separated from its good (nourishment). Inadequacies in his understanding of the purpose of food and eating may be instructive when we think about inadequacies in his understanding of sex. If there is more to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  47. Defending Musical Perdurantism.Ben Caplan & Carl Matheson - 2006 - British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (1):59-69.
    If musical works are abstract objects, which cannot enter into causal relations, then how can we refer to musical works or know anything about them? Worse, how can any of our musical experiences be experiences of musical works? It would be nice to be able to sidestep these questions altogether. One way to do that would be to take musical works to be concrete objects. In this paper, we defend a theory according to which musical works are concrete objects. In (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  48.  18
    Sweet and Sour Rats: The Effect of Insulin Dosage on Shock-Elicited Aggression.Jerry Neideffer, Mary Nell Travis, Stephen F. Davis, James W. Voorhees & Robert E. Prytula - 1977 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 10 (4):311-312.
  49.  78
    The Right Not to Know and the Obligation to Know.Ben Davies - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (5):300-303.
    There is significant controversy over whether patients have a ‘right not to know’ information relevant to their health. Some arguments for limiting such a right appeal to potential burdens on others that a patient’s avoidable ignorance might generate. This paper develops this argument by extending it to cases where refusal of relevant information may generate greater demands on a publicly funded healthcare system. In such cases, patients may have an ‘obligation to know’. However, we cannot infer from the fact that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  50. Sweet Nothings.Gabriele Contessa - 2012 - Analysis 72 (2):354-366.
    [This paper is part of a book symposium on Jody Azzouni's Talking about Nothing: Numbers, Hallucinations, and Fictions].
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000