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  1.  8
    Organizing Moral Case Deliberation Experiences in Two Dutch Nursing Homes.S. van der Dam, T. A. Abma, A. C. Molewijk, M. J. M. Kardol, Jmga Schols & G. A. M. Widdershoven - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (3):327-340.
    Moral case deliberation (MCD) is a specific form of clinical ethics, aiming to stimulate ethical reflection in daily practice in order to improve the quality of care. This article focuses on the implementation of MCD in nursing homes and the questions how and where to organize MCD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate one way of organizing MCD in two Dutch nursing homes. In both of these nursing homes the MCD groups had a heterogeneous composition and were organized (...)
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  2.  23
    Enacting Ethics: Bottom-Up Involvement in Implementing Moral Case Deliberation. [REVIEW]F. C. Weidema, A. C. Molewijk, G. A. M. Widdershoven & T. A. Abma - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (1):1-19.
    In moral case deliberation (MCD), healthcare professionals meet to reflect upon their moral questions supported by a structured conversation method and non-directive conversation facilitator. An increasing number of Dutch healthcare institutions work with MCD to (1) deal with moral questions, (2) improve reflection skills, interdisciplinary cooperation and decision-making, and (3) develop policy. Despite positive evaluations of MCD, organization and implementation of MCD appears difficult, depending on individuals or external experts. Studies on MCD implementation processes have not yet been published. The (...)
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  3.  64
    “Here’s My Dilemma”. Moral Case Deliberation as a Platform for Discussing Everyday Ethics in Elderly Care.S. van der Dam, T. A. Abma, M. J. M. Kardol & G. A. M. Widdershoven - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (3):250-267.
    Our study presents an overview of the issues that were brought forward by participants of a moral case deliberation (MCD) project in two elderly care organizations. The overview was inductively derived from all case descriptions (N = 202) provided by participants of seven mixed MCD groups, consisting of care providers from various professional backgrounds, from nursing assistant to physician. The MCD groups were part of a larger MCD project within two care institutions (residential homes and nursing homes). Care providers are (...)
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  4.  65
    “Here's My Dilemma”. Moral Case Deliberation as a Platform for Discussing Everyday Ethics in Elderly Care.S. Dam, T. A. Abma, M. J. M. Kardol & G. A. M. Widdershoven - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (3):250-267.
    Our study presents an overview of the issues that were brought forward by participants of a moral case deliberation (MCD) project in two elderly care organizations. The overview was inductively derived from all case descriptions (N = 202) provided by participants of seven mixed MCD groups, consisting of care providers from various professional backgrounds, from nursing assistant to physician. The MCD groups were part of a larger MCD project within two care institutions (residential homes and nursing homes). Care providers are (...)
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  5.  35
    Client Participation in Moral Case Deliberation: A Precarious Relational Balance. [REVIEW]F. C. Weidema, T. A. Abma, G. A. M. Widdershoven & A. C. Molewijk - 2011 - HEC Forum 23 (3):207-224.
    Moral case deliberation (MCD) is a form of clinical ethics support in which the ethicist as facilitator aims at supporting professionals with a structured moral inquiry into their moral issues from practice. Cases often affect clients, however, their inclusion in MCD is not common. Client participation often raises questions concerning conditions for equal collaboration and good dialogue. Despite these questions, there is little empirical research regarding client participation in clinical ethics support in general and in MCD in particular. This article (...)
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  6.  33
    Goals of Clinical Ethics Support: Perceptions of Dutch Healthcare Institutions. [REVIEW]L. Dauwerse, T. A. Abma, B. Molewijk & G. Widdershoven - 2013 - Health Care Analysis 21 (4):323-337.
    In previous literature, ethicists mention several goals of Clinical Ethics Support (CES). It is unknown what key persons in healthcare institutions see as main–—and sub-goals of CES. This article presents the goals of CES as perceived by board members and members of ethics support staff. This is part of a Dutch national research using a mixed methods design with questionnaires, focus groups and interviews. Quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed and combined in an iterative process. Four main clusters of goals (...)
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  7.  21
    Moving Perspectives on Patient Competence: A Naturalistic Case Study in Psychiatry.A. M. Ruissen, T. A. Abma, A. J. L. M. Van Balkom, G. Meynen & G. A. M. Widdershoven - 2016 - Health Care Analysis 24 (1):71-85.
    Patient competence, defined as the ability to reason, appreciate, understand, and express a choice is rarely discussed in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder, and coercive measures are seldom used. Nevertheless, a psychiatrist of psychologist may doubt whether OCD patients who refuse treatment understand their disease and the consequences of not being treated, which could result in tension between respecting the patient’s autonomy and beneficence. The purpose of this article is to develop a notion of competence that is grounded in clinical (...)
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  8.  23
    The Photo-Instrument as a Health Care Intervention.J. E. Sitvast & T. A. Abma - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (2):177-195.
    The aim of this study is to describe how hermeneutic photography and one application of hermeneutic photography in particular, namely the photo-instrument, can be used as a health care intervention that fosters meaning (re-)construction of mental illness experiences. Studies into the ways how patients construct meaning in illness narratives indicate that aesthetic expressions of experiences may play an important role in meaning making and sharing. The study is part of a larger research project devoted to understanding the photostories that result (...)
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  9.  38
    Empirical Ethics Within Rapidly Changing Practices.A. H. G. van Elteren, T. A. Abma & G. A. M. Widdershoven - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (4):493-504.
  10.  24
    Moral Learning in Psychiatric Rehabilitation.J. E. Sitvast, G. A. M. Widdershoven & T. A. Abma - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (4):583-595.
    The purpose of this article is to illustrate moral learning in persons with a psychiatric disability who participated in a nursing intervention, called the photo-instrument. This intervention is a form of hermeneutic photography. The findings are based on a multiple case study of 42 patients and additional interviews with eight of them. Photo groups were organized within three settings of psychiatric services: ambulatory as well as clinical, all situated in the Netherlands. Data were analysed according to hermeneutic and semiotic principles. (...)
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  11.  27
    Struggling Between Strength and Vulnerability, a Patients’ Counter Story.G. J. Teunissen, M. A. Visse & T. A. Abma - 2015 - Health Care Analysis 23 (3):288-305.
    Currently, patients are expected to take control over their health and their life and act as independent users and consumers. Simultaneously, health care policy demands patients are expected to self manage their disease. This article critically questions whether this is a realistic expectation. The paper presents the auto-ethnographic narrative of the first author, which spans a period of 27 years, from 1985 to 2012. In total nine episodes were extracted from various notes, conversations and discussions in an iterative process. Each (...)
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  12. Two Women with Multiple Sclerosis. Conflicting Normative Expectations Between Patients and Their Caregivers.T. A. Abma, B. Oeseburg, M. Goldsteen, G. A. M. Widdershoven & M. Verkerk - 2005 - Nursing Ethics 12 (5):479-492.
     
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