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T. Allan Hillman
University of South Alabama
  1.  52
    Substantial Simplicity in Leibniz.T. Allan Hillman - 2009 - Review of Metaphysics 63 (1):91-138.
    This article attempts to determine how Leibniz might safeguard the simplicity of an individual substance (singular) while also retaining the view that causal powers (plural) are constitutive of said individual substance. I shall argue that causal powers are not to be understood as veritable parts of a substance in so far as such an account would render substances as unnecessarily complex. Instead, my proposal is that sense can be made of Leibniz’s metaphysical picture by appeal to truthmakers. In order to (...)
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  2.  20
    Scotus and God’s Arbitrary Will.Tully Borland & T. Allan Hillman - 2017 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 91 (3):399-429.
    Most agree that Scotus is a voluntarist of some kind. In this paper we argue against recent interpretations of Scotus’s ethics according to which the norms concerning human actions are largely, if not wholly, the arbitrary products of God’s will. On our reading, the Scotistic variety of voluntarism on offer is much more nuanced. Key to our interpretation is keeping distinct what is too often conflated: the reasons why Scotus maintains that the laws of the Second Table of the Decalogue (...)
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  3.  6
    Duns Scotus on the Metaphysics of Virtue and Conformity to Right Reason.T. Allan Hillman & Tully Borland - 2018 - South African Journal of Philosophy 37 (3):284-301.
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    Duns Scotus on the Nature of Justice.T. Allan Hillman & Tully Borland - 2019 - Studia Neoaristotelica 16 (2):275-305.
    Duns Scotus has a remarkably unique and comprehensive theory concerning the nature of justice. Alas, commentators on his work have yet to full flesh out the details. Here, we begin the process of doing so, focusing primarily on his metaethical views on justice, i.e., what justice is or amounts to. While Scotus’s most detailed account of justice can be found in his Ordinatio, we find further specifics emerging in a number of other contexts and works. We argue that Scotus offers (...)
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  5.  13
    Faulkner the Stoic: Honor, Evil, and the Snopeses in the Snopes Trilogy.T. Allan Hillman - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1A):260-279.
    According to the stoic philosopher Chrysippus, we are to imagine our lives by analogy to a dog that is tied to a cart. It is not up to the dog whether or not he is so tied, just as it is not up to us what our external circumstances happen to be. However, it is up to the dog whether he willingly runs along behind the cart or is unwillingly dragged, just as it is up to us to decide the (...)
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  6.  40
    Leibniz and Luther on the Non-Cognitive Component of Faith.T. Allan Hillman - 2013 - Sophia 52 (2):219-234.
    Leibniz was a Lutheran. Yet, upon consideration of certain aspects of his philosophical theology, one might suspect that he was a Lutheran more in name than in intellectual practice. Clearly Leibniz was influenced by the Catholic tradition; this is beyond doubt. However, the extent to which Leibniz was influenced by his own Lutheran tradition—indeed, by Martin Luther himself—has yet to be satisfactorily explored. In this essay, the views of Luther and Leibniz on the non-cognitive component of faith are considered in (...)
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  7.  17
    Leibniz and the Imitation of God: A Criticism of Voluntarism.T. Allan Hillman & Tully Borland - 2011 - Philosophy and Theology 23 (1):3-27.
    The primary goal of this essay is to demonstrate that Leibniz’s objections to theological voluntarism are tightly connected to his overarching metaphysical system; a secondary goal is to show that his objections are not without some merit. Leibniz, it is argued, holds to strong versions of the imago dei doctrine, i.e., creatures are made in the image of God, and imitatio dei doctrine, i.e., creatures ought to imitate God. Consequently, God and creatures must possess similar structures of moral psychology, and (...)
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  8.  75
    Leibniz and the Imitation of God.T. Allan Hillman & Tully Borland - 2011 - Philosophy and Theology 23 (1):3-27.
    The primary goal of this essay is to demonstrate that Leibniz’s objections to theological voluntarism are tightly connected to his overarching metaphysical system; a secondary goal is to show that his objections are not without some merit. Leibniz, it is argued, holds to strong versions of the imago dei doctrine, i.e., creatures are made in the image of God, and imitatio dei doctrine, i.e., creatures ought to imitate God. Consequently, God and creatures must possess similar structures of moral psychology, and (...)
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  9. Leibniz on the iImago Dei.T. Allan Hillman - 2010 - In Daniel Garber & Steven Nadler (eds.), Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy Volume V. Oxford University Press.
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  10.  88
    The Early Russell on the Metaphysics of Substance in Leibniz and Bradley.T. Allan Hillman - 2008 - Synthese 163 (2):245-261.
    While considerable ink has been spilt over the rejection of idealism by Bertrand Russell and G.E. Moore at the end of the 19th Century, relatively little attention has been directed at Russell’s A Critical Exposition of the Philosophy of Leibniz, a work written in the early stages of Russell’s philosophical struggles with the metaphysics of Bradley, Bosanquet, and others. Though a sustained investigation of that work would be one of considerable scope, here I reconstruct and develop a two-pronged argument from (...)
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