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  1.  64
    Hamartia in Aristotle And Greek Tragedy.T. C. W. Stinton - 1975 - Classical Quarterly 25 (02):221-.
    It is now generally agreed that in Aristotle's Poetics, ch. 13 means ‘mistake of fact’. The moralizing interpretation favoured by our Victorian forebears and their continental counterparts was one of the many misunderstandings fostered by their moralistic society, and in our own enlightened erais revealed as an aberration. In challenging this orthodoxy I am not moved by any particular enthusiasm for Victoriana, nor do I want to revive the view that means simply ‘moral flaw’ or ‘morally wrong action’. I shall (...)
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  2.  9
    Hamartia in Aristotle And Greek Tragedy.T. C. W. Stinton - 1975 - Classical Quarterly 25 (2):221-254.
    It is now generally agreed that in Aristotle's Poetics, ch. 13 means ‘mistake of fact’. The moralizing interpretation favoured by our Victorian forebears and their continental counterparts was one of the many misunderstandings fostered by their moralistic society, and in our own enlightened erais revealed as an aberration. In challenging this orthodoxy I am not moved by any particular enthusiasm for Victoriana, nor do I want to revive the view that means simply ‘moral flaw’ or ‘morally wrong action’. I shall (...)
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  3.  18
    Pause and Period In The Lyrics of Greek Tragedy.T. C. W. Stinton - 1977 - Classical Quarterly 27 (01):27-.
    It has long been accepted as a principle by editors and writers on Greek metre that brevis in longo and hiatus in tragic lyrics often coincide with some kind of sense-pause. The object of this inquiry is to determine the incidence of pause in such places, and show that it is significantly high; to show that there is a comparable incidence in the corresponding places in strophic systems; to show that period-ends determined by criteria other than brevis and hiatus are (...)
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  4.  21
    Iphigeneia and the Bears of Brauron.T. C. W. Stinton - 1976 - Classical Quarterly 26 (01):11-.
    In her masterly article on this passge, Dr. Christiane Sourvinou-Inwood goes most of the way towards solving two serious problems: the text of Lys. 645, where the vulgate makes the ‘bears’ more than ten years old, contrary to all other evidence; and the meaning of of A. Ag. 239 . She argues cogently that in Aeschylus means ‘shedding’ the saffron robe, as most editors including Fraenkel have thought, and not ‘letting her robes fall to the ground’ as Lloyd-Jones, followed by (...)
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  5.  16
    Collected Papers on Greek Tragedy. [REVIEW]Michael Comber & T. C. W. Stinton - 1992 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 112:181-182.
  6.  14
    Notes on Greek Tragedy, II.T. C. W. Stinton - 1977 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 97:127-154.
    So Pearson. The strange series of hypodochmiacs here and atO.T.1207 ff., with brevis in longo without pause atAj.421 andO.T.1208, seems metrically self-contained, despite their syntactical interdependence (esp.Aj.421–2οὐκέτ' ἄνδρα μὴ | τόνδ' ἴδητ', so that the word-overlap ofοἷονinto iambics in Pearson's text is unlikely.ἑξερῶ μέγαshould therefore be writtenplena scriptura. Thenοἷον οὔτιν' ἁ Τροί|α στρατοῦ…is possible, but the ithyphallic with word-overlap, sometimes found in the syncopated iambics of Aeschylus, is foreign to Sophocles. Divideἐξερῶ μέγα, | οἷον οὔτινα | Τροία…Thenϕίλοι τοῖσδ' ὁμοῦ = (...)
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  7.  12
    Solon, Fragment 25.T. C. W. Stinton - 1976 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 96:159-162.
    7 πῖαρ Plut.: πυαρ pap.Ath. Pol.ἀνταράξας … ἐξεῖλε pap., coniecerat Gildersleeve: ἂν ταράξας ἐξέλη Plut.Solon is answering his critics. Thedemoshas never had it so good. The ‘bigger and stronger men’, μείζους καὶ βίαν ἀμείνονες, also have cause to thank him. For if anyone else had had this office, ‘he would not have restrained thedemos, nor would he have stopped, before’, etc. Plutarch introduces the lines in almost the same words.V. 7 is difficult. Bergk and others construe: ‘until, having stirred up (...)
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  8.  18
    Notes on Greek Tragedy, I.T. C. W. Stinton - 1976 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 96:121-145.
  9.  8
    The First Stasimon of Aeschylus' Choephori.T. C. W. Stinton - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (02):252-.
    Orestes has revealed himself to Electra and sworn with her to avenge Agamemnon. He outlines his plan and leaves the stage with a prayer to his father, after warning the chorus against indiscretion . They begin: Earth nurtures many dread hurts and fears; the sea's embrace is full of monsters hostile to man; lights in mid-air between earth and heaven also harm winged things and things that tread the earth; and one might also tell of the stormy wrath of tempests. (...)
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  10.  9
    Interlinear Hiatus In Trimeters.T. C. W. Stinton - 1977 - Classical Quarterly 27 (01):67-.
    In CQ 55 , 22–5, E. Harrison noticed that hiatus between verses in the trimeters of dialogue was much less frequent in tragedy when the sense ran on from one verse to the next, than when there was a pause in sense at verse-end. He observed that Aeschylus' Prometheus differed from the other plays of Aeschylus in this respect, the proportion of run-over hiatus to end-stopped hiatus being much higher, and more like that of comedy; that Sophocles had remarkably few (...)
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  11.  17
    Phaedrus and Folklore: An Old Problem Restated.T. C. W. Stinton - 1979 - Classical Quarterly 29 (02):432-.
    There was once a man in a certain village in the mountains, who made his living by making up stories, which he used to tell to the people of his village to while away their evenings. One day he went on a journey to a strange village far away in the plains, and there he saw a group of men sitting round another story-teller. Being curious to learn whether his rival was as good a story-teller as he was, he joined (...)
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  12.  20
    Two Rare Verse-Forms.T. C. W. Stinton - 1965 - The Classical Review 15 (02):142-146.
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