22 found
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  1.  31
    Plato's Euthyphro.T. F. Morris - 1990 - Heythrop Journal 31 (3):309–323.
  2.  32
    Knowledge of Knowledge and of Lack of Knowledge in the Charmides.T. F. Morris - 1989 - International Studies in Philosophy 21 (1):49-61.
  3. Good is Better Than Evil Because It is Nicer: Socrates' Defense of Justice in the "Republic".T. F. Morris - 2008 - Diálogos. Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad de Puerto Rico 43 (91):103-124.
     
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  4.  17
    How Can One Form Be in Many Things?T. F. Morris - 1985 - Apeiron 19 (1):53 - 56.
  5.  12
    'Humour' in the Concluding Unscientific Postscript.T. F. Morris - 1988 - Heythrop Journal 29 (3):300–312.
  6.  16
    Is Plato Really in Favour of Monotonous Literature? Republic 392c6-398b9: Dialogue.T. F. Morris - 2013 - Dialogue 52 (3):491-521.
    Plato is not serious when he has Socrates deduce that poetry must be mostly narrative with just a little dialogue. Not only is the argumentation purposely flawed, but he also has Socrates purposely obfuscate a key distinction. He then has Socrates pretend to be confused by his own obfuscation. By forcing us to work our way through the thickets of his faulty argumentation, Plato gives us the opportunity to become more deeply involved with the underlying issues and to discover his (...)
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  7.  4
    Kierkegaard on Despair and the Eternal.T. F. Morris - 1989 - Sophia 28 (3):21-30.
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  8.  18
    Kierkegaard on Taking an Outing to Deer Park.T. F. Morris - 2007 - Heythrop Journal 48 (3):371–383.
  9.  25
    Kierkegaard's Understanding of Socrates.T. F. Morris - 1986 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 19 (1/2):105 - 111.
  10.  5
    Law and the Cause of Sin in the Epistle to the Romans.T. F. Morris - 1987 - Heythrop Journal 28 (3):285–291.
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  11.  37
    Manliness in Plato’s Laches.T. F. Morris - 2009 - Dialogue 48 (3):619.
    ABSTRACT: Careful analysis of the details of the text allows us to refine Socrates objections to his definition of manliness as prudent perseverance. He does not appreciate that Socrates objections merely require that he make his definition more precise. Nicias refuses to consider objections to his understanding of manliness as avoiding actions that entail risk. The two sets of objections show that manliness entails first calculating that a risk is worth taking and then subsequently not rejecting that calculation without due (...)
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  12.  74
    Plato's Cave.T. F. Morris - 2007 - Southwest Philosophy Review 23 (2):85-110.
    Current interpretations of Plato’s cave are obviously incorrect because they do not explain how what we hear does not come from what we see. I argue that Plato is saying that the colors we receive from our faculty of vision do not cause the sounds that we receive from our faculty of hearing. I also show how we do not see ourselves or one other, how the shadows on the wall of the cave are images of that which casts them (...)
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  13.  10
    Plato’s Cave.T. F. Morris - 2009 - South African Journal of Philosophy 28 (4):415-432.
    Current interpretations of Plato’s cave are obviously incorrect because they do not explain how what we hear does not come from what we see. I argue that Plato is saying that the colors we receive from our faculty of vision do not cause the sounds that we receive from our faculty of hearing. I also show how we do not see ourselves or one other, how the shadows on the wall of the cave are images of that which casts them (...)
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  14.  47
    Plato’s Ion on What Poetry Is About.T. F. Morris - 1993 - Ancient Philosophy 13 (2):265-272.
  15.  3
    Plato’s Ion on What Poetry Is About.T. F. Morris - 1993 - Ancient Philosophy 13 (2):265-272.
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  16.  40
    Plato’s Lysis.T. F. Morris - 1985 - Philosophy Research Archives 11:269-279.
    It is shown that Plato’s Lysis is full of positive content between the lines. At the close of the dialogue Socrates says that he considers Lysis, Menexenus, and himself to be friends of one another. Following up on the questions which the dialogue leads us to ask yields an explanation ofwhy each of these instances of friendship is, in fact, an instance of friendship. In addition, the dialogue shows that there are five types of motivation for desiring something.
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  17.  5
    Plato’s Lysis.T. F. Morris - 1985 - Philosophy Research Archives 11:269-279.
    It is shown that Plato’s Lysis is full of positive content between the lines. At the close of the dialogue Socrates says that he considers Lysis, Menexenus, and himself to be friends of one another. Following up on the questions which the dialogue leads us to ask yields an explanation ofwhy each of these instances of friendship is, in fact, an instance of friendship. In addition, the dialogue shows that there are five types of motivation for desiring something.
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  18.  7
    Plato on True Simplicity: Republic 408c5-410b4.T. F. Morris - 2011 - History of Political Thought 32 (3):379-396.
    Socrates contradicts himself when he claims that a good doctor must have the experience of having an unsound body and when he claims that a good judge must have a sound soul, for the unsound of body will not be treated and how a judge decides the case of a good person is a matter of indifference. These pages are really about the meaning of simplicity of soul, and arguing against Glaucon's claim, 'to be moved by self-advantage is the end (...)
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  19.  19
    Republic Book One on the Nature of Justice.T. F. Morris - 2008 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 25 (1):63-78.
    Even though the first book of the Republic ends with the claim that the definition of justice has not been determined, a careful analysis of the details of Socrates’ arguments with Polemarchus and Thrasymachus yields a definition of justice. Polemarchus should have defended the understanding of justice as helping friends and harming enemies by saying that, because one can use one’s knowledge either to help or to harm, a just person will choose to use his knowledge of an art either (...)
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  20. The Argument in the Protagoras That No One Does What He Believes To Be Bad.T. F. Morris - 1990 - Interpretation 17 (2):291-304.
  21.  8
    The Proof of Pauline Self-Predication in the Phaedo.T. F. Morris - 1984 - Philosophy Research Archives 10:139-151.
    This article shows that Plato is discussing Pauline predication and Pauline self-predication in the Phaedo. The key is the recognition that the “something else” of Phaedo 103e2-5 cannot be a sensible object because any such object which participates in Form ‘X’ can sometimes appear not to be x. It is argued that Plato has not written in a straightforward manner, but rather has written a series of riddles for the reader to solve. Thus this dialogue is an example of the (...)
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  22.  10
    The Proof of Pauline Self-Predication in the Phaedo.T. F. Morris - 1984 - Philosophy Research Archives 10:139-151.
    This article shows that Plato is discussing Pauline predication and Pauline self-predication in the Phaedo. The key is the recognition that the “something else” of Phaedo 103e2-5 cannot be a sensible object because any such object which participates in Form ‘X’ can sometimes appear not to be x. It is argued that Plato has not written in a straightforward manner, but rather has written a series of riddles for the reader to solve. Thus this dialogue is an example of the (...)
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