Results for 'T. H. Lam'

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  1.  13
    A Short Critical History of Architecture. By H. Heathcote Statham. London: B. T. Batsford.F. T. - 1914 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 34:160-161.
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  2.  58
    Direct Medical Costs of Care for Chinese Patients with Colorectal Neoplasia: a Health Care Service Provider Perspective.Carlos K. H. Wong, Cindy L. K. Lam, Jensen T. C. Poon, Sarah M. McGhee, Wai‐Lun Law, Dora L. W. Kwong, Janice Tsang & Pierre Chan - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (6):1203-1210.
  3.  18
    Temporal Fluctuation and Its Power Law in the Crystalline-To-Glass Transition During Electron Irradiation.S. Watanabe, M. Hoshino, T. Koike, T. Suda, S. Ohnuki, H. Takahashi & N. Q. Lam - 2003 - Philosophical Magazine 83 (22):2599-2619.
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  4.  9
    Mediation of Short and Longer Term Effects of an Intervention Program to Enhance Resilience in Immigrants From Mainland China to Hong Kong.Nancy X. Yu, T. H. Lam, Iris K. F. Liu & Sunita M. Stewart - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  5.  17
    ΑΡΙΩΝ- Μουσικὴ τω̑ν Ἑλλήνων ὡς διεσώθη ἀπὸ τω̑ν ἀρχαιοτάτων χρόνων μεχρὶ τω̑ς σήμερονὑπὸ Α. Ρεμαντα̑ καὶ Π. Δ. ΖαχαρίαARIWN-h Mousikh twn Ellhnwn ws dieswqh apo twn arxaiotatwn xronwn mexri tws shmeronupo A. Remanta kai P. D. Zaxaria[REVIEW]J. W. T. H. - 1919 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 39:236.
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  6.  25
    Frederic H. Hedge, D. D.W. T. H. - 1877 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 11 (1):107 - 108.
  7.  11
    Travels and Studies in the Nearer East. By A. T. Olmstead, B. B. Charles, and J. E. Wrench. Vol. I., Part II., Hittite Inscriptions. [Cornell Expedition to Asia Minor, Etc., Organised by J. R. S. Sterrett.] Ithaca, N.Y., 1911[REVIEW]H. H., A. T. Olmstead, B. B. Charles & J. E. Wrench - 1912 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 32:195-196.
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  8.  22
    Infinity in the Presocratics: A Bibliographical and Philosophical Study[REVIEW]T. H. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 26 (3):547-548.
    "Of the making of many books there is no end" seems reasonable enough when the subject is infinity but after reading this well-organized study one is (...)not so sure; a figure suggested by Zeno speaks of "a fog [which] the incessant labours of modern scholars often cause." Sweeneys methodology is to use the ever-increasing body of modern critical discussions as a help in interpreting and assessing the presocratic fragments and their ancient commentators. For Anaximander a particularly detailed and nuanced coverage of the literature between 1947 and 1970 is presented-over twenty major interpretations, with supplementary articles treated in an Appendix. Subsequent chapters treat in less detail the positions on infinity of the other Ionians, Pythagoras, the Eleatics, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, and the Atomists. Here the author relies heavily on existing surveys like those of Kirk and Raven and Guthrie. This raises a question about the kind of audience envisaged. To a sentence like "Let us now trace as simply and yet accurately as possible Ravens views", Raven could be pardoned for reacting with the impression that he had already done just that himself. Much of the book is a perhaps over-leisurely doxography of work written in uncomplicated English, albeit in widely scattered journals; nonetheless Sweeneys imposing, almost intimidating, coverage of bibliography will save even seasoned ancient philosophers many hours of L'année philologique-hunting and makes his work an important and eminently worthwhile contribution. Apart from some relatively minor misprints there is a serious confusion of Alcmaeon with the poet Alcman. Alcman deserves better treatment in the exegesis of Anaximanders "rather poetical terms."—T. H. (shrink)
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  9.  41
    Progress and Decline: The Group in Evolution.T. R. H. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 18 (3):588-588.
    In a highly conscious break with what is termed "orthodox Darwinism," i.e., evolution by natural selection of individual adaptive character, the author presents his forceful and (...)suggestive attempt to recast evolutionary theory by taking Darwin's later concept of the reproductive mode of genetic groups as fundamental. The goal of this reorientation is a "descriptive behavioral science" of evolution from the most primitive clusters of inorganic matter to human societies. The book is "Blakean" in its scope and tone of vision, but suffers from heaviness of style and its misplaced messianic pretensions and prophetic wrath. However, in arguing for a continuity of cosmological, natural and human evolution, and in suggesting a synthesis of the insights of Darwin and Freud, the book is powerful and convincing.—T. R. H. (shrink)
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  10.  18
    The Physical Philosophy of Aristotle: A Modern Interpretation.R. H. T. - 1965 - Review of Metaphysics 18 (3):584-585.
    Since the bulk of this book is devoted to paraphrasing Aristotle's physical views for modern ears, it would have been more correctly styled an exposition or (...)synopsis. As such, the work is of some value and may prove particularly helpful as an introduction. Though many of his expository comments are quite sensitive, the author takes for granted an uncritical acceptance of nineteenth century mechanics in those passages which attempt critical assessment of peripatetic natural science.—R. H. T. (shrink)
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  11.  25
    The Metamorphic Tradition in Modern Poetry: Essays on the Work of Ezra Pound, Wallace Stevens, William Carlos Williams, T. S. Eliot, Hart Crane, Randall Jarrell, and William Butler Yeats.L. H. - 1956 - Review of Metaphysics 9 (4):709-709.
    The author of this perceptive but sometimes rather obscure study treats a number of the major long works of modern poets as expressions of the common theme (...)
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  12.  27
    Le sens musculaire et Les sensations de mouvement: D'après G. H. lewes.G. Lewes & C. T. - 1878 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 6:63 - 67.
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  13.  16
    Puzzling Out the Past: Studies in Northwest Semitic Languages and Literatures in Honor of Bruce Zuckerman. Edited by Marilyn J. Lundberg; Steven Fine; and Wayne T. Pitard. Culture and History of the Ancient Near East, Vol. 55. Leiden : Brill, 2012. Pp. Xvi + 334, Illus. $245[REVIEW]Joseph Lam - 2015 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 135 (2):380-382.
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  14.  13
    Greece and Babylon: A Comparative Sketch of Mesopotamian, Anatolian, and Hellenic Religions. By Lewis R. Farnell. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1911. Pp. 311[REVIEW]H. H. & Lewis R. Farnell - 1912 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 32:194-195.
  15.  19
    Istoria Ths Ellhnikhs Dhmosias Oikonomias, Tomos B, Meros A': H Dhmosia Oikonomia Tou Megalou Alecandrou.W. W. T. & A. M. Andreades - 1930 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 50:164.
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  16. ABRAHAM, U. and SHELAH, S., A AZ Well-Order of the Reals and Incompactness of L (Q”“) BUSS, SR, Intuitionistic Validity in T-Normal Kripke Structures CAICEDO, X., Compactness and Normality in Abstract Logics CENZER, D., DOWNEY, R., JOCKUSCH, C. and SHORE[REVIEW]L. Li, L. I. H. & L. I. U. Y. - 1993 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 59:287.
  17. MARSHALL, H. R. -Consciousness[REVIEW]L. T. L. T. - 1911 - Mind 20:126.
  18.  69
    T.H. Morgan, Neither an Epistemological Empiricist nor aMethodologicalEmpiricist.Marga Vicedo - 1990 - Biology and Philosophy 5 (3):293-311.
    T. H. Morgan (18661945), the founder of the Drosophila research group in genetics that established the chromosome theory of Mendelian inheritance, has been described as a (...)radical empiricist in the historical literature. His empiricism, furthermore, is supposed to have prejudiced him against certain scientific conclusions. This paper aims to show two things: first, that the sense in which the term empiricism has been used by scholars is too weak to be illuminating. It is necessary to distinguish between empiricism as an epistemological position and the so-called methodological empiricism. I will argue that the way the latter has been presented cannot distinguish an empiricist methodology from a non-empiricist one. Second, I will show that T. H. Morgan was not an epistemological empiricist as this term is usually defined in philosophy. The reason is that he believed in the existence of genes as material entities when they were unobservable entities when they were unobservable entities introduced to account for the phenotypic ratios found in breeding experiments. These two points, of course, are interrelated. If we were to water down the meaning of empiricis, perhaps we could call Morgan an empiricist. But then we would also fail to distinguish empiricism from realism. (shrink)
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  19.  47
    Philosophical Ideas and Scientific Practice: A Note on the Empiricism of T.H. Morgan[REVIEW]N. Roll-Hansen - 1992 - Biology and Philosophy 7 (1):69-76.
    In a reply to Marga Vicedo the philosophical inconsistency of Morgan is emphasized. It is argued that even if a strict classification of scientists according to their (...)
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  20. A New Scheme of Positive and Negative Freedom: Reconstructing T. H. Green on Freedom.Maria Dimova-Cookson - 2003 - Political Theory 31 (4):508-532.
    This article offers a new scheme of the relation between positive and negative freedom that is based on a retrieval of T. H. Green's theory of (...)freedom and on further reconstructions of his theory. Some of the distinctions in the literature have proven difficult to sustain, and this has resulted in a weakening of the dichotomy in principle, and of the concepts of positive and negative freedom independently of each other. The main distinction between negative and positive freedom offered here is based on the relation of freedom to the will. We have two kinds of freedom, in both our private and social spheres, because there are two types of goods that we, as human beings, pursue: ordinary and moral. This distinction proves to be sustainable, manages to explain the antagonistic nature of the two concepts, and provides grounds for the support of the two kinds of freedom in their own right. (shrink)
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  21.  39
    Promoting F.A.I.T.H. In Peer Review: Five Core Attributes of Effective Peer Review[REVIEW]Leigh Turner - 2003 - Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (2):181-188.
    Peer review is an important component of scholarly research. Long a black box whose practical mechanisms were unknown to researchers and readers, peer review is increasingly facing (...)
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  22.  53
    Generosity and Property in Aristotle's Politics: T. H. IRWIN.T. H. Irwin - 1987 - Social Philosophy and Policy 4 (2):37-54.
    Etymology might encourage us to begin a discussion of Aristotle on philanthropy with a discussion of philanthropia ; and it is instructive to see why this is not (...) quite the right place to look. The Greek term initially refers to a generalized attitude of kindness and consideration for a human being. The gods accuse Prometheus of being ahuman-lover’, intending the term in an unfavorable sense, when he confers on human beings the benefits that should have been confined to the gods. Aristotle uses the abstract noun only once, to refer to sympathetic fellow-feeling ; and he mentions our feeling of kinship with other human beings to explain our approval of the philanthropos person. Philanthropia is the attitude of a kind and considerate person, even if she lacks material resources, and it can be displayed without the transfer of material resources. (shrink)
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  23.  36
    Tradition and Reason in the History of Ethics: T. H. IRWIN.T. H. Irwin - 1989 - Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (1):45-68.
    Students of the history of ethics sometimes find themselves tempted by moderate or extreme versions of an approach that might roughly be calledhistoricist’. This temptation may (...)
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  24.  42
    Perfectionism and the Common Good: Themes in the Philosophy of T. H. Green.David O. Brink - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    David Brink presents a study of T. H. Green's Prolegomena to Ethics (1883), a classic of British idealism. Green develops a perfectionist ethical theory that brings (...)together the best elements in the ancient and modern traditions and that provides the moral foundations for Green's own influential brand of liberalism. Brink's book situates the Prolegomena in its intellectual context, examines its main themes, and explains Green's enduring significance for the history of ethics and contemporary ethical theory. (shrink)
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  25. T.H. Green's Moral and Political Philosophy: A Phenomenological Perspective.Maria Dimova-Cookson - 2001 - Palgrave.
    This book offers a new phenomenological interpretation of T.H. Green's (1836-1882) philosophy and political theory. By analyzing his theory of human practice, the moral idea, (...)
     
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  26.  83
    Time as NonObservational Knowledge: How to Straighten Out ΔEΔtH.Constantin Antonopoulos - 1997 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 11 (2):165 – 183.
    The Energy-Time Uncertainty (ETU) has always been a problem-ridden relation, its problems stemming uniquely from the perplexing question of how to understand this mysterious Δ t (...) . On the face of it (and, indeed, far deeper than that), we always know what time it is. Few theorists were ignorant of the fact that time in quantum mechanics is exogenously defined, in no ways intrinsically related to the system. Time in quantum theory is an independent parameter, which simply means independently known . In the early 1960s Aharonov (1961-64) and Bohm (1961-64) mounted a spirited attack against the ETU, which sealed its fate to the present date. By emphasising that time is alwayswell-definedin quantum theory, they were led to the conclusion that no ETU should exist, a view shared by many in the 1990s, if Busch (1990) is to be believed. In a similar vein, I emphasize that (a) physical systems occupy a particular energy state at a particular instant of time, if at all; (b) even in absence of all time-measuring instruments, it is still trivially warranted that one can measure a system's energy as accurately as one pleases, and simply announceThe system's energy is exactly E NOW!”, a possibility which no quantum mechanics of any sort, or any physical theory whatsoever, can afford to tamper with or change, except circularly. One never loses one's own perception of time, when one measures the energy, a fact which no measurement conceivable can interfere with or affect. Both (a) and (b) uniquely entail that energy and time are compatible, if not indeed intimately interconnected, contrary to what the relevant uncertainty seems to affirm. In response to Aharonov's and Bohm's initial problem, I reinterpret ΔEΔth , as directly derived from authentic quantum principles, without however having to assume a direct incompatibility between its related concepts, attributing their complementarity to conditions other than ordinarily assumed. (shrink)
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  27.  23
    Reconciling Faith and Reason: T. H. Greens Theory of Human Agency.Adrian Paylor - 2018 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 79 (1-2):156-177.
    The Victorian age was a period in which Christian Orthodoxy was undermined by new and emerging forms of reasoned inquiry. The commonly-held view amongst historians is (...)that the intellectual life in the era was composed of two hostile camps; those who defended Christian Orthodoxy and those who championed the new sciences. The received view is that, when faced by the new fields of reasoned inquiry, Christianitys prominence within British intellectual life and discourse went into terminal decline. The intention of this article is to demonstrate that there was a middle ground between the two camps. In particular, this article aims to demonstrate that attempts were made to reconcile Christianity with the findings of the emerging forms of reasoned inquiry. This will be achieved through providing an examination of T. H. Greens theory of Human Agency. Green he was one of the most prominent philosophers of the Victorian age. Through his theory of human agency, Green consciously engaged in the debate that existed between theistic Christianity and the emerging forms of reason inquiry of the time. (shrink)
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  28. T. H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics, and Political Philosophy.Maria Dimova-Cookson & William J. Mander (eds.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Recent years have seen a growth of interest in the great English idealist thinker T. H. Green (1836-82) as philosophers have begun to overturn received opinions (...)of his thought and to rediscover his original and important contributions to ethics, metaphysics, and political philosophy. This collection of essays by leading experts, all but one published here for the first time, introduces and critically examines his ideas both in their context and in their relevance to contemporary debates. (shrink)
     
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  29.  18
    T. H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics, and Political Philosophy.Maria Dimova-Cookson & William J. Mander (eds.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Recent years have seen a growth of interest in the great English idealist thinker T. H. Green (1836-82) as philosophers have begun to overturn received opinions (...)of his thought and to rediscover his original and important contributions to ethics, metaphysics, and political philosophy. This collection of essays by leading experts, all but one published here for the first time, introduces and critically examines his ideas both in their context and in their relevance to contemporary debates. (shrink)
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  30.  70
    T. H. Green, Kant, and Hegel on Free Will.William J. Mander - 2012 - Idealistic Studies 42 (1):69-89.
    Scholars have remained undecided how much the British Idealists owe to Hegel, how much to Kant, and how much they may be credited with minting a new (...)
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  31.  95
    T.H. Green's Theory of Positive Freedom: From Metaphysics to Political Theory (Review).James W. Allard - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (4):538-539.
    Although T. H. Green is primarily remembered today as a moral and political philosopher, many of his philosophical concerns owe their origins to the Victorian crisis of (...)
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  32.  85
    Freedom From, in and Through the State: T.H. Marshall's Trinity of Rights Revisited.Zygmunt Bauman - 2005 - Theoria 44 (108):13-27.
    Each one of T.H. Marshall's trinity of human rights rested on the state as, simultaneously, its birth place, executive manager and guardian. And no wonder. At (...) the time Marshall tied personal, political and social freedoms into a historically determined succession of won/bestowed rights, the boundaries of the sovereign state marked the limits of what humans could contemplate, and what they thought they should jointly do, in order to make their world more user-friendly. The state enclosed territory was the site of private initiatives and public actions, as well as the arena on which private interests and public issues met, clashed and sought reconciliation. In all those respects, the realm of state sovereignty was presumed to be self-contained, selfassertive and self-sufficient. (shrink)
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  33.  12
    The Moral Philosophy of T. H. Green.T. H. Green & Geoffrey Thomas - 1987 - Ethics 101 (1):194-195.
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  34. Self-Realization and the Common Good : Themes in T.H. Green.David O. Brink - 2006 - In Maria Dimova-Cookson & W. J. Mander (eds.), T.H. Green: Ethics, Metaphysics, and Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  35.  7
    T. H. Huxley on Education.Cyril Bibby & T. H. Huxley - 1972 - British Journal of Educational Studies 20 (3):352-353.
  36.  11
    The Feminism of T. H. Green: A Late-Victorian Success Story?O. Anderson - 1991 - History of Political Thought 12 (4):671.
    Rather surprisingly, T.H.Green's ideas on women and the family are as neglected today as they were immediately after his death in 1882, when his thought (...)
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  37.  36
    Perfectionism and the Common Good: Themes in the Philosophy of T. H. Green.Daniel Dombrowski - 2004 - Review of Metaphysics 58 (2):425-426.
    Brink reminds us that T. H. Greens Prolegomena to Ethics is a neglected classic in the history of ethics, comparable to F. H. Bradleys Ethical Studies (...) and Henry Sidgwicks Methods of Ethics. This is saying quite a bit when it is considered that no less a figure than John Rawls has claimed that Sidgwicks version of utilitarianism is the most sophisticated and carefully reasoned to date. On Greens view, however, perfectionism is the main rival in ethical theory to utilitarianism. Green defends a version of perfectionism that relies on both the ancients and Kant, thereby anticipating recent readings of Kant that emphasize the importance of virtue in that thinker. (shrink)
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  38.  12
    The Politics of Conscience: T H Green and His Age[REVIEW]Colin Tyler - 1997 - Bradley Studies 3 (2):192-198.
    On its first publication, Stuart Hampshire opened his review of Melvin Richters Politics of Conscience with the claim that, “T H Green, who died in 1882, (...)is a minor figure in the history of philosophy.” Hampshire continued. (shrink)
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  39.  17
    Isoi and Homoioi: Equality and Sameness in T.H. Greens Theory of Rights Recognition.Matt Hann - 2016 - Political Theory 44 (4):496-517.
    T.H. Green argues that rights cannot exist, save for in a society in which people recognise each other asἴσοι καὶ ὅμοιοι.” Green leaves the phrase (...)untranslated, and there is a certain ambiguity about what exactly Green meant and a lack of attention to this stipulation in the secondary literature. This essay argues that equality and sameness in Green must be understood as two categorically different criteria, both of which must be satisfied in order to make rights recognition possible. Further, this essay examines a tension this distinction between equality and sameness reveals in Greens work: Greens commitment to patriotism in his Lectures on the Principles of Political Obligation may seem at first to be at odds with his more cosmopolitan tendencies in the Prolegomena to Ethics. However, a way of resolving this tension is suggested: re-conceiving what patriotism andsamenessmeans by reading Greens work as less dependent on the concept ofnationthan that of subsequent British idealists such as Bernard Bosanquet demonstrates that sameness and equality, though different, complement each other. (shrink)
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  40.  20
    T. H. Greens Philosophical Manuscripts: An Annotated Catalog.C. A. Smith - 1979 - Idealistic Studies 9 (2):178-184.
    T. H. Green was born April 7, 1836, and died in his forty-seventh year on March 26, 1882. He was appointed to lecture in ancient and (...)modern history at Balliol College on April 11, 1860, and was awarded a fellowship at Balliol on November 30th of that year. For the last four years of his life, he was Whytes Professor of Moral Philosophy, Oxford University. Apart from one short interruption as an assistant commissioner of schools and several as a result of illness, Green was philosophically active until his death. Yet, for a philosopher who during his lifetime attained his degree of eminence and influence in moral and political thought, Green published remarkably little. With the exception of an essay on Aristotle, a lengthy critical introduction to an edition of Hume, and several minor essays and reviews, all Greens writings were issued posthumously. (shrink)
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  41.  10
    Freedom From, In and Through the State: T.H. Marshall's Trinity of Rights Revisited.Zygmunt Bauman - 2005 - Theoria 52:13-27.
    Each one of T.H. Marshall's trinity of human rights rested on the state as, simultaneously, its birth place, executive manager and guardian. And no wonder. At (...) the time Marshall tied personal, political and social freedoms into a historically determined succession of won/bestowed rights, the boundaries of the sovereign state marked the limits of what humans could contemplate, and what they thought they should jointly do, in order to make their world more user-friendly. The state enclosed territory was the site of private initiatives and public actions, as well as the arena on which private interests and public issues met, clashed and sought reconciliation. In all those respects, the realm of state sovereignty was presumed to be self-contained, selfassertive and self-sufficient. (shrink)
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  42.  32
    Perfectionism and the Common Good: Themes in the Philosophy of T.H. Green (Review).Phillip Ferreira - 2005 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (3):369-370.
    Phillip Ferreira - Perfectionism and the Common Good: Themes in the Philosophy of T.H. Green - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43:3 Journal of the History (...)
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  43.  14
    Double Recognition: Persons and Rights in T.H. Green.M. Hann - 2015 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 21 (1):63-80.
    The work of T.H. Green provides a justificatory argument for human rights which is a powerful alternative to the still prevailing account of rights, which sees (...)them as somehow tied to human nature and argues that humans have rights qua humans, and independent of society. Green's account of rights turns on the process of social recognition. However, the precise mechanism for recognition is left slightly ambiguous. This paper argues that recognition in Green can be usefully divided into two stages, 'recognition of persons' and 'recognition of rights'. It will be argued that the two are separate and that the first is a necessary prerequisite for the second. Recognition of persons is the recognition of moral action based on the use of language; recognition of rights occurs in societies of persons and is the dialogical recognition of certain rights claims. (shrink)
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  44.  27
    T.H. Green as a Phenomenologist: Linking British Idealism and Continental Phenomenology.Maria Dimova - 1998 - Angelaki 3 (1):77 – 88.
    (1998). T.H. Green as a phenomenologist: linking British idealism and continental phenomenology. Angelaki: Vol. 3, Impurity, authenticity and humanity, pp. 77-88.
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  45.  11
    Ball, Bosanquet and the Legacy of T.H. Green.M. Carter - 1999 - History of Political Thought 20 (4):674-694.
    This paper challenges the commonplace view of T.H. Green and his followers: that they divided politically into left and right groups depending on their views of (...)socialism, state action and the individual. By examining in detail the work of Green's followers, Bernard Bosanquet and Sidney Ball, this paper shows that there was, in fact, a broad consensus between the two on questions of the role of the state. This has significant implications for the understanding of idealism, the work of Bosanquet and of Green's legacy itself. (shrink)
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  46.  9
    Athens. The Athenian Agora: Results of Excavations Conducted by the American School of Classical Studies at Athens., Vol. Viii. Late Geometric and Protoattic Pottery, Mid 8th to Late 7th Century B.C. By E. T. H. Brann. Princeton, N.J.: American School at Athens. 1962. Pp. Xiv + 134. 46 Plates. 9 Text Figures. $12.50[REVIEW]J. N. Coldstream, Athens & E. T. H. Brann - 1964 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 84:216-218.
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  47.  8
    Idealism and Revolution: T.H. Green's Four Lectures on the English Commonwealth.Duncan Kelly - 2006 - History of Political Thought 27 (3):505-542.
    In January 1867 T.H. Green gave a series of Four Lectures on the English Commonwealth to the Edinburgh Philosophical Institute, which were then published, on the (...)testimony of 'competent judges', in the third volume of his Collected Works edited by R.L. Nettleship. Green's family background ensured that he had strong interests in the history of Puritanism and the figure of Oliver Cromwell, and he was thoroughly immersed in many of the political and religious controversies of the later quarter of the nineteenth century. Nevertheless, his assessment of the English Commonwealth as a fruit of the Reformation, rather than as a discrete transformation in political culture, has received relatively little attention in the massive literature devoted to Green's political philosophy. This essay assesses these lectures in order to show their importance for understanding in particular his analysis of freedom. It argues that without an understanding of his account of the origins of modern legal freedom born out of the English Revolution, analyses of Green's theory of freedom remain partial and incomplete. It does so by illustrating in detail the content of the lectures, the intellectual and historical debates in English philosophy and German theology that buttressed his arguments, by locating Green's Lectures within wider accounts of the character of English exceptionalism, and by attempting to examine the political context that helped to structure Green's analysis. (shrink)
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  48.  7
    Perfectionism and the Common Good: Themes in the Philosophy of T. H. Green[REVIEW]Daniel Dombrowski - 2004 - Review of Metaphysics 58 (2):425-426.
    Brink reminds us that T. H. Greens Prolegomena to Ethics is a neglected classic in the history of ethics, comparable to F. H. Bradleys Ethical Studies (...) and Henry Sidgwicks Methods of Ethics. This is saying quite a bit when it is considered that no less a figure than John Rawls has claimed that Sidgwicks version of utilitarianism is the most sophisticated and carefully reasoned to date. On Greens view, however, perfectionism is the main rival in ethical theory to utilitarianism. Green defends a version of perfectionism that relies on both the ancients and Kant, thereby anticipating recent readings of Kant that emphasize the importance of virtue in that thinker. (shrink)
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  49.  4
    A New Scheme Of Positive And Negative Freedom: Reconstructing T. H. Green on Freedom.Maria Dimova-Cookson - 2003 - Philosophy Today 31 (4):508-532.
    This article offers a new scheme of the relation between positive and negative freedom that is based on a retrieval of T. H. Green's theory of (...)freedom and on further reconstructions of his theory. Some of the distinctions in the literature have proven difficult to sustain, and this has resulted in a weakening of the dichotomy in principle, and of the concepts of positive and negative freedom independently of each other. The main distinction between negative and positive freedom offered here is based on the relation of freedom to the will. We have two kinds of freedom, in both our private and social spheres, because there are two types of goods that we, as human beings, pursue: ordinary and moral. This distinction proves to be sustainable, manages to explain the antagonistic nature of the two concepts, and provides grounds for the support of the two kinds of freedom in their own right. (shrink)
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  50.  7
    Studies and Documents Relating to the History of the Greek Church and People Under Turkish Domination. By T. H. Papadopoullos. Brussels: Bibliotheca Graeca Aevi Posterions, 1952. Pp. Xxiv + 507. Price Not Stated[REVIEW]C. A. Trypanis & T. H. Papadopoullos - 1954 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 74:244-244.
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