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Thomas E. Hill [69]Thomas D. Hill [25]Thomas Hill [24]Thomas E. Hill Jr [15]
T. Patrick Hill [9]Thomas English Hill [7]Timothy Hill [6]T. E. Hill [5]

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Teja Hill
Wittenberg University
  1. Women and Moral Theory.Eva Feder Kittay, Carol Gilligan, Annette C. Baier, Michael Stocker, Christina H. Sommers, Kathryn Pyne Addelson, Virginia Held, Thomas E. Hill Jr, Seyla Benhabib, George Sher, Marilyn Friedman, Jonathan Adler, Sara Ruddick, Mary Fainsod, David D. Laitin, Lizbeth Hasse & Sandra Harding - 1989 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    To find more information about Rowman and Littlefield titles, please visit www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
     
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  2. Dignity and Practical Reason in Kant's Moral Theory.Thomas E. Hill - 1992 - Cornell University Press.
  3.  2
    Collected Papers. [REVIEW]Thomas E. Hill & John Rawls - 2001 - Journal of Philosophy 98 (5):269-272.
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  4. Autonomy and Self-Respect.Thomas E. Hill - 1991 - Cambridge University Press.
    This stimulating collection of essays in ethics eschews the simple exposition and refinement of abstract theories. Rather, the author focuses on everyday moral issues, often neglected by philosophers, and explores the deeper theoretical questions which they raise. Such issues are: Is it wrong to tell a lie to protect someone from a painful truth? Should one commit a lesser evil to prevent another from doing something worse? Can one be both autonomous and compassionate? Other topics discussed are servility, weakness of (...)
  5.  16
    Collected Papers.Thomas E. Hill & John Rawls - 2001 - Journal of Philosophy 98 (5):269-272.
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  6.  5
    On the Status of Nonconscious Processes in Human Cognition: Comment on Reber.Pawel Lewicki & Thomas Hill - 1989 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 118 (3):239-241.
  7.  61
    Human Welfare and Moral Worth: Kantian Perspectives.Thomas E. Hill - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    Thomas Hill, a leading figure in the recent development of Kantian moral philosophy, presents a set of essays exploring the implications of basic Kantian ideas for practical issues. The first part of the book provides background in central themes in Kant's ethics; the second part discusses questions regarding human welfare; the third focuses on moral worth-the nature and grounds of moral assessment of persons as deserving esteem or blame. Hill shows moral, political, and social philosophers just how valuable moral theory (...)
  8. Respect, Pluralism, and Justice: Kantian Perspectives.Thomas E. Hill - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    Respect, Pluralism, and Justice is a series of essays which sketches a broadly Kantian framework for moral deliberation, and then uses it to address important social and political issues. Hill shows how Kantian theory can be developed to deal with questions about cultural diversity, punishment, political violence, responsibility for the consequences of wrongdoing, and state coercion in a pluralistic society.
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  9. Ideals of Human Excellence and Preserving Natural Environments.Thomas E. Hill Jr - 1983 - Environmental Ethics 5 (3):211-224.
    The moral significance of preserving natural environments is not entirely an issue of rights and social utility, for a person’s attitude toward nature may be importantly connected with virtues or human excellences. The question is, “What sort of person would destroy the natural environment--or even see its value solely in cost/benefit terms?” The answer I suggest is that willingness to do so may well reveal the absence of traits which are a natural basis for a proper humility, self-acceptance, gratitude, and (...)
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  10. Kant on Virtue and the Virtues.Thomas E. Hill & Adam Cureton - 2014 - In Nancy Snow (ed.), Cultivating Virtue: Multiple Perspectives. pp. 87-110.
    Immanuel Kant is known for his ideas about duty and morally worthy acts, but his conception of virtue is less familiar. Nevertheless Kant’s understanding of virtue is quite distinctive and has considerable merit compared to the most familiar conceptions. Kant also took moral education seriously, writing extensively on both the duty of adults to cultivate virtue and the empirical conditions to prepare children for this life-long responsibility. Our aim is, first, to explain Kant’s conception of virtue, second, to highlight some (...)
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  11.  28
    Nonconscious Acquisition of Information.P. Lewicki, T. Hill & M. Czyewska - unknown
    We are reviewing and summarizing evidence for the processes of acquisition of information outside of conscious awareness (processing information about covariations, nonconscious indirect and interactive inferences, self-perpetuation of procedural knowledge). A considerable amount of data indicates that as compared to consciously controlled cognition, the nonconscious information-acquisition processes are not only much faster but also structurally more sophisticated in the sense that they are capable of efficient processing of multidimensional and interactive relations between variables. Those mechanisms of nonconscious acquisition of information (...)
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  12.  34
    Virtue, Rules, and Justice: Kantian Aspirations.Thomas E. Hill - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Thomas E. Hill, Jr., interprets and extends Kant's moral theory in a series of essays that highlight its relevance to contemporary ethics. He introduces the major themes of Kantian ethics and explores its practical application to questions about revolution, prison reform, and forcible interventions in other countries for humanitarian purposes.
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  13.  9
    Autonomy and Self-Respect.Martina Herrmann & Thomas E. Hill - 1994 - Philosophical Review 103 (4):736.
  14. The Kantian Conception of Autonomy.Thomas E. Hill - 1989 - In John Philip Christman (ed.), The Inner Citadel: Essays on Individual Autonomy. Oxford University Press. pp. 91--105.
  15. The Hypothetical Imperative.Thomas E. Hill - 1973 - Philosophical Review 82 (4):429-450.
  16. Kantian Constructivism in Ethics.Thomas E. Hill Jr - 1989 - Ethics 99 (4):752-770.
  17. Kant on Imperfect Duty and Supererogation.Thomas E. Hill Jr - 1971 - Kant-Studien 62 (1-4):55-76.
  18. Kant and Race.Thomas E. Hill & Bernard Boxill - 2000 - In Bernard Boxill (ed.), Race and Racism. Oxford University Press.
  19.  7
    Self-Perpetuating Development of Encoding Biases.Pawel Lewicki, Thomas Hill & Irene Sasaki - 1989 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 118 (4):323-337.
  20.  19
    Ideals of Human Excellence and Preserving Natural Environments.T. E. Hill - 1983 - Environmental Ethics 5 (3):211-224.
    The moral significance of preserving natural environments is not entirely an issue of rights and social utility, for a person’s attitude toward nature may be importantly connected with virtues or human excellences. The question is, “What sort of person would destroy the natural environment--or even see its value solely in cost/benefit terms?” The answer I suggest is that willingness to do so may well reveal the absence of traits which are a natural basis for a proper humility, self-acceptance, gratitude, and (...)
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  21.  98
    Moral Responsibilities of Bystanders.Thomas E. Hill Jr - 2010 - Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (1):28-39.
  22. The Message of Affirmative Action.Thomas E. Hill - 1991 - Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (2):108.
    Affirmative action programs remain controversial, I suspect, partly because the familiar arguments for and against them start from significantly different moral perspectives. Thus I want to step back for a while from the details of debate about particular programs and give attention to the moral viewpoints presupposed in different types of argument. My aim, more specifically, is to compare the “messages” expressed when affirmative action is defended from different moral perspectives. Exclusively forward-looking arguments, I suggest, tend to express the wrong (...)
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  23. Kant's Theory of Imagination.Sarah Gibbons, Paul Guyer, Dieter Henrich, Thomas E. Hill & Marshall Farrier - 1996 - Philosophical Quarterly 46 (183):226-237.
     
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  24.  43
    Moral Construction as a Task: Sources and Limits.Thomas E. Hill - 2008 - Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (1):214-236.
    This essay first distinguishes different questions regarding moral objectivity and relativism and then sketches a broadly Kantian position on two of these questions. First, how, if at all, can we derive, justify, or support specific moral principles and judgments from more basic moral standards and values? Second, how, if at all, can the basic standards such as my broadly Kantian perspective, be defended? Regarding the first question, the broadly Kantian position is that from ideas in Kant's later formulations of the (...)
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  25.  1
    The Implications of a Changing Climate on the Kapenta Fish Stocks of Lake Kariba, Zimbabwe.Mzime Regina Ndebele-Murisa, Emmanuel Mashonjowa & Trevor Hill - 2011 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 66 (2):105-119.
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  26.  13
    The Importance of Moral Rules and Principles.Thomas E. Hill - unknown
    This is the text of The Lindley Lecture for 2006, given by Thomas E. Hill, Jr., an American philosopher.
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  27. Autonomy and Benevolent Lies.Thomas E. Hill - 1984 - Journal of Value Inquiry 18 (4):251-267.
  28.  4
    The Hypothetical Imperative.Thomas E. Hill - 1973 - Philosophical Review 82 (4):429-450.
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  29.  17
    Finding Value in Nature.Thomas Hill - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (3):331-341.
    This paper explores the idea that a proper valuing of natural environments is essential to a broader human virtue that might be called 'appreciation of the good'. This kind of valuing can explain, without any commitment to a metaphysics of intrinsic values, how and why it is good to value certain natural phenomena for their own sakes. The objection that such an approach is excessively human-centred is considered and rebutted.
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  30.  60
    Symbolic Protest and Calculated Silence.Thomas E. Hill Jr - 1979 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 9 (1):83-102.
  31.  74
    Kant on Wrongdoing, Desert, and Punishment.Thomas E. Hill - 1999 - Law and Philosophy 18 (4):407 - 441.
  32.  86
    Hypothetical Consent in Kantian Constructivism.Thomas E. Hill - 2001 - Social Philosophy and Policy 18 (2):300.
    Epistemology, as I understand it, is a branch of philosophy especially concerned with general questions about how we can know various things or at least justify our beliefs about them. It questions what counts as evidence and what are reasonable sources of doubt. Traditionally, episte-mology focuses on pervasive and apparently basic assumptions covering a wide range of claims to knowledge or justified belief rather than very specific, practical puzzles. For example, traditional epistemologists ask “How do we know there are material (...)
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  33. The Importance of Autonomy.Thomas E. Hill - 1987 - In Eva Feder Kittay & Diana T. Meyers (eds.), Women and Moral Theory. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 129--138.
  34.  87
    Self-Respect Reconsidered.Thomas E. Hill Jr - 1982 - Tulane Studies in Philosophy 31:129-137.
  35.  78
    Happiness and Human Flourishing in Kant's Ethics.Thomas E. Hill - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (1):143.
    Ancient moral philosophers, especially Aristotle and his followers, typically shared the assumption that ethics is primarily concerned with how to achieve the final end for human beings, a life of “happiness” or “human flourishing.” This final end was not a subjective condition, such as contentment or the satisfaction of our preferences, but a life that could be objectively determined to be appropriate to our nature as human beings. Character traits were treated as moral virtues because they contributed well toward this (...)
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  36.  11
    Rüdiger Bittner on Autonomy.Thomas E. Hill - 2013 - Erkenntnis (S7):1-10.
    Rüdiger Bittner surveys with a skeptical eye classic and contemporary ideas of Kantian autonomy. He allows that we can be more or less free in a modest (quasi-Hobbesian) sense and that many people may want more of this freedom from impediments that make it difficult or impossible to do various things. He argues, however, that high-minded general affirmations of human freedom are unfounded and not likely to retain their grip on our thinking. While acknowledging the value of Bittner’s challenges, I (...)
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  37. Kant's Argument for the Rationality of Moral Conduct.Thomas E. Hill Jr - 1985 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 66 (1-2):3.
     
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  38.  62
    Punishment, Conscience, and Moral Worth.Thomas E. Hill - 1998 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (S1):51-71.
  39.  46
    The Blackwell Guide to Kant's Ethics.Thomas E. Hill (ed.) - 2009 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Through a collection of new, previously unpublished essays, _The_ _Blackwell Guide to Kant’s Ethics_ addresses diverse topics crucial to our understanding of Kant's moral philosophy and its implications for the modern age. Provides a fresh perspective on themes in Kant’s moral philosophy Addresses systematically Kant’s foundational work, _Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals_ and his more specific treatment of justice and virtue in _The Metaphysics of Morals_ Includes essays by both established scholars and rising stars Identifies common misperceptions of Kant's (...)
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  40.  35
    How Clinicians Make (or Avoid) Moral Judgments of Patients: Implications of the Evidence for Relationships and Research. [REVIEW]Terry E. Hill - 2010 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5:11.
    Physicians, nurses, and other clinicians readily acknowledge being troubled by encounters with patients who trigger moral judgments. For decades social scientists have noted that moral judgment of patients is pervasive, occurring not only in egregious and criminal cases but also in everyday situations in which appraisals of patients' social worth and culpability are routine. There is scant literature, however, on the actual prevalence and dynamics of moral judgment in healthcare. The indirect evidence available suggests that moral appraisals function via a (...)
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  41.  36
    A Kantian Perspective on Moral Rules.Thomas E. Hill - 1992 - Philosophical Perspectives 6:285-304.
  42. Kant On Punishment: A Coherent Mix Of Deterrence And Retribution?Thomas E. Hill - 1997 - Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 5.
    Kant is often regarded as an extreme retributivist, but recently commentators emphasize the importance of deterrence in Kant's basic justification of punishment. Kant's combination of deterrence and retributive elements, however, must be distinguished from others that are less plausible. To interpret Kant as merely adding retributive side-constraints to a basic deterrence aim fails to capture fully the retributive strain in Kant's thought. The basic questions are: who should be punished, how much, in what manner, and why? Kant held that all (...)
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  43. Kantian Virtue and Virtue Ethics.Thomas E. Hill - 2008 - In Monika Betzler (ed.), Kant's Ethics of Virtues. De Gruyter.
  44.  39
    Kant and Humanitarian Intervention.Thomas E. Hill - 2009 - Philosophical Perspectives 23 (1):221-240.
  45. The Problem of Stability in Political Liberalism.Thomas E. Hill - 1994 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 75:333-352.
     
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  46.  19
    Comments on Frasz and Cafaro on Environmental Virtue Ethics.Thomas Hill Jr - 2001 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 8 (2):59-62.
    Professor Hill delivered these comments as part of the International Society for Environmental Ethics panels on Environmental Virtue Ethics, held at the annual meeting of the Pacific Division of the American Philosophical Association, April 2000, in Albuquerque, NM Philip Cafaro’s paper “Thoreau, Leopold and Carson: Toward an Environmental Virtue Ethics” appears in Environmental Ethics 23(2001), 3-17. Geoffrey Frasz’s paper “What is Environmental Virtue Ethics That We Should Be Mindful of It?” is published as part of this special issue of Philosophy (...)
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  47.  51
    Assessing Moral Rules: Utilitarian and Kantian Perspectives.Thomas E. Hill Jr - 2005 - Philosophical Issues 15 (1):158–178.
  48. Treating Criminals as Ends in Themselves.Thomas E. Hill - 2003 - Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 11.
    Bezugnehmend auf Kants Moralphilosophie entwickelt dieser Beitrag eine These dazu, was mit der Forderung gemeint sein soll, Personen unter Beachtung ihrer Würde bzw. als "Zweck an sich selbst" zu behandeln. Es wird vorgeschlagen, die Implikationen von Kants "Menschheitsformel" als ein Bündel von mit einander verwandten Vorschriften zu interpretieren, die das moralische Nachdenken darüber, wie die Prinzipien unserer tagtäglichen Entscheidungen spezifiziert und interpretiert werden sollten, leiten und begrenzen können. Der Beitrag bearbeitet sodann die folgenden drei Fragestellungen: Was folgt aus dem Vorangehenden (...)
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  49.  4
    The Practice of Moral Judgment.Thomas E. Hill & Barbara Herman - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):47.
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  50. Kant's Tugendlehre as Normative Ethics.Thomas E. Hill - 2010 - In Lara Denis (ed.), Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
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