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T. J. Kasperbauer
Indiana University
  1.  13
    Forget Evil: Autonomy, the Physician–Patient Relationship, and the Duty to Refer.Jake Greenblum & T. J. Kasperbauer - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):313-317.
    Aulisio and Arora argue that the moral significance of value imposition explains the moral distinction between traditional conscientious objection and non-traditional conscientious objection. The former objects to directly performing actions, whereas the latter objects to indirectly assisting actions on the grounds that indirectly assisting makes the actor morally complicit. Examples of non-traditional conscientious objection include objections to the duty to refer. Typically, we expect physicians who object to a practice to refer, but the non-traditional conscientious objector physician refuses to refer. (...)
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  2.  50
    Should We Bring Back the Passenger Pigeon? The Ethics of De-Extinction.T. J. Kasperbauer - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):1-14.
    Recent advances in synthetic biology have made it possible to revive extinct species of animals, a process known as ‘de-extinction’. This paper examines two reasons for supporting de-extinction: the potential for de-extinct species to play useful roles in ecosystems; and human valuing of certain de-extinct species. I focus on the particular case of passenger pigeons to argue that the most critical challenge for de-extinction is that it entails significant suffering for sentient individual animals. I also provide reasons to take existence (...)
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  3.  21
    Subhuman: The Moral Psychology of Human Attitudes to Animals.T. J. Kasperbauer - 2018 - Oup Usa.
    How do we think about animals? How do we decide what they deserve and how we ought to treat them? Subhuman takes an interdisciplinary approach to these questions, drawing from research in philosophy, neuroscience, psychology, law, history, sociology, economics, and anthropology. Subhuman argues that our attitudes to nonhuman animals, both positive and negative, largely arise from our need to compare ourselves to them.
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  4.  16
    Communicating Identifiability Risks to Biobank Donors.T. J. Kasperbauer, Mickey Gjerris, Gunhild Waldemar & Peter Sandøe - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (1):123-136.
    Recent highly publicized privacy breaches in health care and genomics research have led many to question whether current standards of data protection are adequate. Improvements in de-identification techniques, combined with pervasive data sharing, have increased the likelihood that external parties can track individuals across multiple databases. This paper focuses on the communication of identifiability risks in the process of obtaining consent for donation and research. Most ethical discussions of identifiability risks have focused on the severity of the risk and how (...)
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  5.  12
    Measuring Understanding and Respecting Trust in Biobank Consent.T. J. Kasperbauer & Peter H. Schwartz - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (5):29-31.
    Volume 19, Issue 5, May 2019, Page 29-31.
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  6.  5
    In Defence of Forgetting Evil: A Reply to Pilkington on Conscientious Objection.Jake Greenblum & T. J. Kasperbauer - 2021 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 18 (1):189-191.
    In a recent article for this journal, Bryan Pilkington makes a number of critical observations about one of our arguments for non-traditional medical conscientious objectors’ duty to refer. Non-traditional conscientious objectors are those professionals who object to indirectly performing actions—like, say, referring to a physician who will perform an abortion. In our response here, we discuss his central objection and clarify our position on the role of value conflicts in non-traditional conscientious objection.
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  7.  7
    Protecting Health Privacy Even When Privacy is Lost.T. J. Kasperbauer - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (11):768-772.
    The standard approach to protecting privacy in healthcare aims to control access to personal information. We cannot regain control of information after it has been shared, so we must restrict access from the start. This ‘control’ conception of privacy conflicts with data-intensive initiatives like precision medicine and learning health systems, as they require patients to give up significant control of their information. Without adequate alternatives to the control-based approach, such data-intensive programmes appear to require a loss of privacy. This paper (...)
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  8.  32
    Naturalizing Sentimentalism for Environmental Ethics.T. J. Kasperbauer - 2015 - Environmental Ethics 37 (2):221-237.
    Jesse Prinz and Shaun Nichols have argued that within metaethics, sentimentalism is the theory that best accords with empirical facts about human moral psychology. Recent findings in experimental moral psychology, they argue, indicate that emotions are psychologically central to our moral concepts. One way of testing the empirical adequacy of sentimentalism is by looking at research on environmental values. A classic problem in environmental ethics is providing an account of the intrinsic value of nonhuman entities, which is often thought to (...)
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  9.  58
    Nussbaum and the Capacities of Animals.T. J. Kasperbauer - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (5):977-997.
    Martha Nussbaum’s capabilities approach emphasizes species-specific abilities in grounding our treatment of animals. Though this emphasis provides many action-guiding benefits, it also generates a number of complications. The criticism registered here is that Nussbaum unjustifiably restricts what is allowed into our concept of species norms, the most notable restrictions being placed on latent abilities and those that arise as a result of human intervention. These restrictions run the risk of producing inaccurate or misleading recommendations that fail to correspond to the (...)
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  10.  46
    Psychological Constraints on Egalitarianism: The Challenge of Just World Beliefs.T. J. Kasperbauer - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (3):217-234.
    Debates over egalitarianism for the most part are not concerned with constraints on achieving an egalitarian society, beyond discussions of the deficiencies of egalitarian theory itself. This paper looks beyond objections to egalitarianism as such and investigates the relevant psychological processes motivating people to resist various aspects of egalitarianism. I argue for two theses, one normative and one descriptive. The normative thesis holds that egalitarians must take psychological constraints into account when constructing egalitarian ideals. I draw from non-ideal theories in (...)
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  11.  21
    Animals as Disgust Elicitors.T. J. Kasperbauer - 2015 - Biology and Philosophy 30 (2):167-185.
    This paper attempts to explain how and why nonhuman animals elicit disgust in human beings. I argue that animals elicit disgust in two ways. One is by triggering disease–protection mechanisms, and the other is by eliciting mortality salience, or thoughts of death. I discuss how these two types of disgust operate and defend their conceptual and theoretical coherence against common objections. I also outline an explanatory challenge for disgust researchers. Both types of disgust indicate that a wide variety of animals (...)
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  12.  19
    Behaviorally Inadequate: A Situationist Critique of Environmental Virtues.T. J. Kasperbauer - 2014 - Environmental Ethics 36 (4):471-487.
    According to situationism in psychology, behavior is primarily influenced by external situational factors rather than internal traits or motivations such as virtues. Environmental ethicists wish to promote pro-environmental behaviors capable of providing adequate protection for the environment, but situationist critiques suggest that character traits, and environmental virtues, are not as behaviorally robust as is typically supposed. Their views present a dilemma. Because ethicists cannot rely on virtues to produce pro-environmental behaviors, the only real way of salvaging environmental virtue theory is (...)
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  13. Conflicting Roles for Humans in Learning Health Systems and AI‐Enabled Healthcare.T. J. Kasperbauer - forthcoming - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.
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  14.  10
    Expanded FDA Regulation of Health and Wellness Apps.T. J. Kasperbauer & David E. Wright - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (3):235-241.
    This paper argues that the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) policy for health and wellness apps is ethically problematic. Currently, the FDA does not regulate health and wellness apps that are not intended for medical use. As a result of this hands‐off policy, preventing harm to consumers is left primarily to developers and app marketplaces. We argue that the FDA’s duties to prevent harm and maintain accountability to the American public require that they play a much stronger role. We also (...)
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  15.  5
    Genetic Data Aren't So Special: Causes and Implications of Reidentification.T. J. Kasperbauer & Peter H. Schwartz - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (5):30-39.
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  16.  5
    Incorporating Biobank Consent Into a Healthcare Setting: Challenges for Patient Understanding.T. J. Kasperbauer, Karen K. Schmidt, Ariane Thomas, Susan M. Perkins & Peter H. Schwartz - forthcoming - AJOB Empirical Bioethics:1-16.
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  17.  81
    Rejecting Empathy for Animal Ethics.T. J. Kasperbauer - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (4):817-833.
    Ethicists have become increasingly skeptical about the importance of empathy in producing moral concern for others. One of the main claims made by empathy skeptics is a psychological thesis: empathy is not the primary psychological process responsible for producing moral concern. Some of the best evidence that could confirm or disconfirm this thesis comes from research on empathizing with animals. However, this evidence has not been discussed in any of the prominent critiques of empathy. In this paper, I investigate six (...)
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  18.  22
    The Implications of Psychological Limitations for the Ethics of Climate Change.T. J. Kasperbauer - 2016 - Environmental Values 25 (3):353-370.
    Most philosophers and psychologists who have explored the psychology of climate change have focused only on motivational issues—getting people to act on what morality requires of them. This is misleading, however, because there are other psychological processes directed not at motivation but rather our ability to grasp the implications of climate change in a general way—what Stephen Gardiner has called the ‘grasping problem’. Taking the grasping problem as my departure point, I draw two conclusions from the relevant psychological literature: 1) (...)
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