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  1.  42
    The Best Interests of Persistently Vegetative Patients: To Die Rather That to Live?T. K. Chan & G. L. Tipoe - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):202-204.
    Adults without the capacity to make their own medical decisions have their rights protected under the Mental Capacity Act in the UK. The underlying principle of the court's decisions is the best interests test, and the evaluation of best interests is a welfare appraisal. Although the House of Lords in the well-known case of Bland held that the decision to withhold treatment for patients in a persistent vegetative state should not be based on their best interests, judges in recent cases (...)
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  2.  28
    A Child Born with Edward's Syndrome: The Legal and Moral Duty to Accede to the Request for Parentage Determination.T. K. Chan, E. Hui & B. Chung - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (6):383-386.
    Advances in medical technology inevitably bring about different kinds of ethical challenges for practising doctors. The following hypothetical case of assisted reproduction is presented as an example. A boy is born with Edward's syndrome following assisted reproduction. The parents suspect that there has been an error of embryo mix-up. They challenge the parenthood and request a genetic test to determine the biological parentage of the neonate. Should the attending paediatrician in this case accede to the request? We argue that the (...)
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  3.  32
    Should We Continue Treatment for M? The Benefits of Living.T. K. Chan & G. L. Tipoe - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (2):131-133.
    Wilkinson and Savulescu did not agree with the court's decision to continue M's treatment and suggested in their recent commentary that the magnitude of benefits of being alive for M is small compared with the potential use of health resources for other patients. We argue that the benefits of being sensate to the surroundings for an otherwise unconscious person are not necessarily small. One cannot assess on behalf of another person the magnitude of benefits of being alive according to the (...)
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