Results for 'T. M. Crowther'

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  1. Two conceptions of conceptualism and nonconceptualism.T. M. Crowther - 2006 - Erkenntnis 65 (2):245-276.
    Though it enjoys widespread support, the claim that perceptual experiences possess nonconceptual content has been vigorously disputed in the recent literature by those who argue that the content of perceptual experience must be conceptual content. Nonconceptualism and conceptualism are often assumed to be well-defined theoretical approaches that each constitute unitary claims about the contents of experience. In this paper I try to show that this implicit assumption is mistaken, and what consequences this has for the debate about perceptual experience. I (...)
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  2.  50
    I_– _T. M. Scanlon.T. M. Scanlon - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):301-317.
  3.  4
    What We Owe to Each Other.T. M. Scanlon (ed.) - 1998 - Harvard University Press.
    How do we judge whether an action is morally right or wrong? If an action is wrong, what reason does that give us not to do it? Why should we give such reasons priority over our other concerns and values? In this book, T. M. Scanlon offers new answers to these questions, as they apply to the central part of morality that concerns what we owe to each other. According to his contractualist view, thinking about right and wrong is thinking (...)
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  4. Philosophy, East and West: essays in honour of Dr. T. M. P. Mahadevan.T. M. P. Mahadevan & Hywel David Lewis (eds.) - 1976 - Bombay: Blackie & Son (India).
    Bhattacharyya, K. The Advaita concept of subjectivity.--Deutsch, E. Reflections on some aspects of the theory of rasa.--Nakamura, H. The dawn of modern thought in the East.--Organ, T. Causality, Indian and Greek.--Chatterjee, M. On types of classification.--Lacombe, O. Transcendental imagination.--Bahm, A. J. Standards for comparative philosophy.--Herring, H. Appearance, its significance and meaning in the history of philosophy.--Chang Chung-yuan. Pre-rational harmony in Heidegger's essential thinking and Chʼan thought.--Staal, J. F. Making sense of the Buddhist tetralemma.--Enomiya-Lassalle, H. M. The mysticism of Carl Albrecht (...)
     
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  5. Preference and urgency.T. M. Scanlon - 1975 - Journal of Philosophy 72 (19):655-669.
  6.  58
    Ethics and the Acquisition of Organs.T. M. Wilkinson - 2011 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    Transplantation is a medically successful and cost-effective way to treat people whose organs have failed--but not enough organs are available to meet demand. T. M. Wilkinson explores the major ethical problems raised by policies for acquiring organs. Key topics include the rights of the dead, the role of the family, and the sale of organs.
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  7. The Diversity of Objections to Inequality.T. M. Scanlon - unknown
    This is the text of The Lindley Lecture for 1996, given by T.M. Scanlon, an American philosopher.
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  8. Contractualism and Utilitarianism.T. M. Scanlon - 1998 - In James Rachels (ed.), Ethical Theory 2: Theories About How We Should Live. Oxford University Press.
     
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  9. 3 Rawls on Justification.T. M. Scanlon - 2003 - In Samuel Richard Freeman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Rawls. Cambridge University Press. pp. 139.
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  10.  8
    Index.T. M. Scanlon - 2008 - In Moral Dimensions: Permissibility, Meaning, Blame. Harvard University Press. pp. 243-247.
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  11. The Significance of Choice.T. M. Scanlon - 1988 - In Sterling M. McMurrin (ed.), The Tanner Lectures on Human Values (Vol. 8, pp. 149-216). University of Utah Press.
     
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  12. Metaphysics and morals.T. M. Scanlon - 2010 - In Mario de Caro & David Macarthur (eds.), Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association. Columbia University Press. pp. 7 - 22.
    This essay argues that normative judgments, in general, and moral judgments, in particular, are "truth apt" and can be objects of belief. Other main claims are: judgments about reasons, if interpreted as true, do not have metaphysical implications that are incompatible with a scientific view of the world. Two kinds of normative claims should be distinguished: substantive claims about what reasons people have and structural claims about what attitudes people must have insofar as they are rational. Employing this distinction, the (...)
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  13. Intention and permissibility, I.T. M. Scanlon - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):301–317.
    [T. M. Scanlon] It is clearly impermissible to kill one person because his organs can be used to save five others who are in need of transplants. It has seemed to many that the explanation for this lies in the fact that in such cases we would be intending the death of the person whom we killed, or failed to save. What makes these actions impermissible, however, is not the agent's intention but rather the fact that the benefit envisaged does (...)
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  14.  24
    Intention and Permissibility.T. M. Scanlon & Jonathan Dancy - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74:301-338.
    [T. M. Scanlon] It is clearly impermissible to kill one person because his organs can be used to save five others who are in need of transplants. It has seemed to many that the explanation for this lies in the fact that in such cases we would be intending the death of the person whom we killed, or failed to save. What makes these actions impermissible, however, is not the agent's intention but rather the fact that the benefit envisaged does (...)
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  15. The Significance of Choice.T. M. Scanlon - 2003 - In Gary Watson (ed.), Free Will. Oxford University Press.
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  16. The Spin-Echo Experiments and the Second Law of Thermodynamics.T. M. Ridderbos & M. L. G. Redhead - 1998 - Foundations of Physics 28 (8):1237-1270.
    We introduce a simple model for so-called spin-echo experiments. We show that the model is a mincing system. On the basis of this model we study fine-grained entropy and coarse-grained entropy descriptions of these experiments. The coarse-grained description is shown to be unable to provide an explanation of the echo signals, as a result of the way in which it ignores dynamically generated correlations. This conclusion is extended to the general debate on the foundations of statistical mechanics. We emphasize the (...)
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  17.  45
    Metaphysics and Morals.T. M. Scanlon - 2003 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 77 (2):7-22.
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  18.  25
    Historical Inevitability.T. M. Knox - 1955 - Philosophical Quarterly 5 (19):189-189.
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  19.  15
    Discourse-mediation of the mapping between language and the visual world: Eye movements and mental representation.Yuki Kamide Gerry T. M. Altmann - 2009 - Cognition 111 (1):55.
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  20. Reasons: A Puzzling Duality?T. M. Scanlon - 2004 - In R. Jay Wallace, Philip Pettit, Samuel Scheffler & Michael Smith (eds.), Reason and Value: Themes From the Moral Philosophy of Joseph Raz. Clarendon Press.
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  21.  74
    Replies.T. M. Scanlon - 2002 - Social Theory and Practice 28 (2):337-358.
  22. Rights, goals, and fairness.T. M. Scanlon - 1977 - Erkenntnis 11 (1):81 - 95.
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  23.  8
    Gesammelte Werke.T. M. Knox - 1972 - Philosophical Quarterly 22 (88):274-274.
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  24. Replies.T. M. Scanlon - 2003 - Ratio 16 (4):424–439.
  25. Reply to Zofia Stemplowska.T. M. Scanlon - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):508-514.
    Describes the author’s value of choice account of responsibility and examines a response by Stemplowska to an objection to this account, raised by Alex Voorhoeve. Argues that the problem raised by Voorhoeve’s example concerns the way in which risk is taken into account in contractualism rather than the value of choice account of responsibility. Departs from the author’s earlier work in arguing that the risk of harm should sometimes be taken into account on an ex ante rather than an ex (...)
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  26. Normative realism and ontology: reply to Clarke-Doane, Rosen, and Enoch and McPherson.T. M. Scanlon - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 47 (6):877-897.
    In response to comments on my book, Being Realistic about Reasons, by Justin Clarke-Doane, David Enoch and Tristram McPherson, and Gideon Rosen, I try to clarify my domain-based view of ontology, my understanding of the epistemology of normative judgments, and my interpretation of the phenomenon of supervenience.
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  27. Reasons, responsibility, and reliance: Replies to Wallace, Dworkin, and Deigh.T. M. Scanlon - 2002 - Ethics 112 (3):507-528.
  28.  57
    Well-Being: Its Meaning, Measurement and Moral Importance.T. M. Scanlon - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (2):312.
  29. Reply to Leif Wenar.T. M. Scanlon - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):400-405.
    Explains how a contractualist moral theory can explain the moral phenomena commonly called rights, although it does not appeal to the notion of a right as a basic element of moral thinking, or explain the difference between rights violations and wrongs of other kinds. Argues that the latter failure is not an important fault.
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  30.  34
    Intention and Permissibility.T. M. Scanlon & Jonathan Dancy - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74:301-338.
    It is clearly impermissible to kill one person because his organs can be used to save five others who are in need of transplants. It has seemed to many that the explanation for this lies in the fact that in such cases we would be intending the death of the person whom we killed, or failed to save. What makes these actions impermissible, however, is not the agent's intention but rather the fact that the benefit envisaged does not justify an (...)
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  31.  67
    Individual and family decisions about organ donation.T. M. Wilkinson - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):26–40.
    abstract This paper examines, from a philosophical point of view, the ethics of the role of the family and the deceased in decisions about organ retrieval. The paper asks: Who, out of the individual and the family, should have the ultimate power to donate or withhold organs? On the side of respecting the wishes of the deceased individual, the paper considers and rejects arguments by analogy with bequest and from posthumous bodily integrity. It develops an argument for posthumous autonomy based (...)
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  32.  17
    Malebranche.T. M. Schmaltz - 2004 - Mind 113 (449):215-218.
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  33. Wrongness and Reasons: A Re-examination.T. M. Scanlon - 2007 - In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics. Clarendon Press.
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  34. Is the Contextuality Loophole Fatal for the Derivation of Bell Inequalities?T. M. Nieuwenhuizen - 2011 - Foundations of Physics 41 (3):580-591.
    It is explained on a physical basis how absence of contextuality allows Bell inequalities to be violated, without bringing an implication on locality or realism. Hereto we connect first to the local realistic theory Stochastic Electrodynamics, and then put the argument more broadly. Thus even if Bell Inequality Violation is demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt, it will have no say on local realism, because absence of contextuality prevents the Bell inequalities to be derived from local realistic models.
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  35. The appeal and limits of constructivism.T. M. Scanlon - 2012 - In James Lenman & Yonatan Shemmer (eds.), Constructivism in Practical Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  36.  38
    Prayer as Inner Sense Cultivation: An Attentional Learning Theory of Spiritual Experience.T. M. Luhrmann & Rachel Morgain - 2012 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 40 (4):359-389.
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  37.  43
    The Faith Frame: Or, Belief is Easy, Faith is Hard.T. M. Luhrmann - 2018 - Contemporary Pragmatism 15 (3):302-318.
    This paper argues for thinking about religious commitments as different in kind from everyday ordinary understandings of the world. It argues against the straightforward assertion from the cognitive science of religion that belief in the supernatural is easy. That is, there is a way in which intuitions of invisible presence come very easily to people. Yet to sustain that belief commitment is hard, especially when the invisible other is omnipotent and benevolent. Here I suggest that it makes more sense to (...)
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  38.  36
    Counter-Manipulation and Health Promotion.T. M. Wilkinson - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (3):257-266.
    It is generally wrong to manipulate. One leading reason is because manipulation interferes with autonomy, in particular the component of autonomy called ‘independence’, that is, freedom from intentional control by others. Manipulative health promotion would therefore seem wrong. However, manipulative techniques could be used to counter-manipulation, for example, playing on male fears of impotence to counter ‘smoking is sexy’ advertisements. What difference does it make to the ethics of manipulation when it is counter-manipulation? This article distinguishes two powerful defences of (...)
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  39.  25
    Individual and family consent to organ and tissue donation: is the current position coherent?T. M. Wilkinson - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (10):587-590.
    The current position on the deceased’s consent and the family’s consent to organ and tissue donation from the dead is a double veto—each has the power to withhold and override the other’s desire to donate. This paper raises, and to some extent answers, questions about the coherence of the double veto. It can be coherently defended in two ways: if it has the best effects and if the deceased has only negative rights of veto. Whether the double veto has better (...)
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  40. Responsibility and the value of choice.T. M. Scanlon - 2013 - Think 12 (33):9-16.
    ExtractImagine that you are struggling to finish a project, with the deadline fast approaching. Nearly done, you are about to print out what you have finished when a dialog box appears on your computer screen telling you that you must download and install an update for some piece of software. Frustrated, you try to make it go away, but it keeps reappearing. So you relent and click on ‘Install’, and your screen is filled with small print listing ‘Terms and Conditions’. (...)
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  41. Hegel's Philosophy of Right.T. M. Knox - 1945 - Philosophy 20 (75):81-84.
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  42.  35
    Consent and the Use of the Bodies of the Dead.T. M. Wilkinson - 2012 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (5):445-463.
    Gametes, tissue, and organs can be taken from the dying or dead for reproduction, transplantation, and research. Whole bodies as well as parts can be used for teaching anatomy. While these uses are diverse, they have an ethical consideration in common: the claims of the people whose bodies are used. Is some use permissible only when people have consented to the use, actually wanted the use, would have wanted the use, not opposed the use, or what? The aim of this (...)
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  43. Equality of resources and equality of welfare: A forced marriage?T. M. Scanlon - 1986 - Ethics 97 (1):111-118.
  44.  48
    Average Utilitarianisms.T. M. Hurka - 1982 - Analysis 42 (2):65 - 69.
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  45.  53
    Hegel and Prussianism.T. M. Knox - 1940 - Philosophy 15 (57):51 - 63.
    Despite the efforts of Bosanquet, Muirhead, Basch, and many others, it is still frequently stated or implied, in both popular and scholarly literature, that Hegel constructed his philosophy of the State with an eye to pleasing the reactionary and conservative rulers of Prussia in his day, and condoned, supported, and, through his teaching, became partly responsible for some of the most criticized features in “Prussianism” and even of present-day National-Socialism.5 Ijn this article I propose to give reasons for denying that (...)
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  46. Plato's psychology.T. M. Robinson - 1970 - [Toronto]: University of Toronto Press.
    Plato's Psychology originally published in 1970 and reprinted in 1972, is still the definitive modern discussion of the nature and development of Plato's ...
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  47. Wrongness and Reasons: A Re-examination.T. M. Scanlon - 2007 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 2:5-20.
     
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  48.  88
    More Average Utilitarianisms.T. M. Hurka - 1982 - Analysis 42 (3):115 - 119.
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  49. Rights, goals, and fairness.T. M. Scanlon - 1988 - In Samuel Scheffler (ed.), Consequentialism and its critics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  50. Plato's Psychology.T. M. Robinson - 1973 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):131-142.
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