Results for 'T. M. Olino'

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  1.  34
    Early-emerging cognitive vulnerability to depression and the serotonin transporter promoter region polymorphism.E. P. Hayden, L. R. Dougherty, B. Maloney, T. M. Olino, H. Sheikh, C. E. Durbin, J. I. Nurnberger Jr, D. K. Lahiri & D. N. Klein - 2008 - J Affect Disord 107:227-30.
    BACKGROUND: Serotonin transporter promoter genotype appears to increase risk for depression in the context of stressful life events. However, the effects of this genotype on measures of stress sensitivity are poorly understood. Therefore, this study examined whether 5-HTTLPR genotype was associated with negative information processing biases in early childhood. METHOD: Thirty-nine unselected seven-year-old children completed a negative mood induction procedure and a Self-Referent Encoding Task designed to measure positive and negative schematic processing. Children were also genotyped for the 5-HTTLPR gene. (...)
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  2.  22
    Temperamental fearfulness in childhood and the serotonin transporter promoter region polymorphism: a multimethod association study.E. P. Hayden, L. R. Dougherty, B. Maloney, C. Emily Durbin, T. M. Olino, J. I. Nurnberger Jr, D. K. Lahiri & D. N. Klein - 2007 - Psychiatr Genet 17:135-42.
    OBJECTIVES: Early-emerging, temperamental differences in fear-related traits may be a heritable vulnerability factor for anxiety disorders. Previous research indicates that the serotonin transporter promoter region polymorphism is a candidate gene for such traits. METHODS: Associations between 5-HTTLPR genotype and indices of fearful child temperament, derived from maternal report and standardized laboratory observations, were examined in a community sample of 95 preschool-aged children. RESULTS: Children with one or more long alleles of the 5-HTTLPR gene were rated as significantly more nervous during (...)
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  3.  14
    What We Owe to Each Other.T. M. Scanlon (ed.) - 1998 - Harvard University Press.
    How do we judge whether an action is morally right or wrong? If an action is wrong, what reason does that give us not to do it? Why should we give such reasons priority over our other concerns and values? In this book, T. M. Scanlon offers new answers to these questions, as they apply to the central part of morality that concerns what we owe to each other. According to his contractualist view, thinking about right and wrong is thinking (...)
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  4. Contractualism and Utilitarianism.T. M. Scanlon - 1998 - In James Rachels (ed.), Ethical Theory 2: Theories About How We Should Live. Oxford University Press UK.
     
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  5. 3 Rawls on Justification.T. M. Scanlon - 2002 - In Samuel Freeman (ed.), The Cambridge companion to Rawls. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 139.
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  6. The Diversity of Objections to Inequality.T. M. Scanlon - unknown
    This is the text of The Lindley Lecture for 1996, given by T.M. Scanlon, an American philosopher.
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  7. The Significance of Choice.T. M. Scanlon - 1988 - In Sterling M. McMurrin (ed.), The Tanner Lectures on Human Values (Vol. 8, pp. 149-216). University of Utah Press.
     
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  8. The Significance of Choice.T. M. Scanlon - 1982 - In Gary Watson (ed.), Free will. New York: Oxford University Press.
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  9.  60
    I_– _T. M. Scanlon.T. M. Scanlon - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):301-317.
  10.  67
    Ethics and the Acquisition of Organs.T. M. Wilkinson - 2011 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    Transplantation is a medically successful and cost-effective way to treat people whose organs have failed--but not enough organs are available to meet demand. T. M. Wilkinson explores the major ethical problems raised by policies for acquiring organs. Key topics include the rights of the dead, the role of the family, and the sale of organs.
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  11. Preference and urgency.T. M. Scanlon - 1975 - Journal of Philosophy 72 (19):655-669.
  12.  76
    Replies.T. M. Scanlon - 2002 - Social Theory and Practice 28 (2):337-358.
  13. Rights, goals, and fairness.T. M. Scanlon - 1977 - Erkenntnis 11 (1):81 - 95.
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  14. Reasons: A Puzzling Duality?T. M. Scanlon - 2004 - In R. Jay Wallace (ed.), Reason and value: themes from the moral philosophy of Joseph Raz. New York: Oxford University Press.
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  15. Replies.T. M. Scanlon - 2003 - Ratio 16 (4):424–439.
  16. Reply to Zofia Stemplowska.T. M. Scanlon - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):508-514.
    Describes the author’s value of choice account of responsibility and examines a response by Stemplowska to an objection to this account, raised by Alex Voorhoeve. Argues that the problem raised by Voorhoeve’s example concerns the way in which risk is taken into account in contractualism rather than the value of choice account of responsibility. Departs from the author’s earlier work in arguing that the risk of harm should sometimes be taken into account on an ex ante rather than an ex (...)
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  17. Reply to Leif Wenar.T. M. Scanlon - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):400-405.
    Explains how a contractualist moral theory can explain the moral phenomena commonly called rights, although it does not appeal to the notion of a right as a basic element of moral thinking, or explain the difference between rights violations and wrongs of other kinds. Argues that the latter failure is not an important fault.
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  18.  21
    Fragments.T. M. Heraclitus & Robinson - 1987 - Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press.
  19.  30
    Historical Inevitability.T. M. Knox - 1955 - Philosophical Quarterly 5 (19):189-189.
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  20. Reasons, responsibility, and reliance: Replies to Wallace, Dworkin, and Deigh.T. M. Scanlon - 2002 - Ethics 112 (3):507-528.
  21.  64
    Well-Being: Its Meaning, Measurement and Moral Importance.T. M. Scanlon - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (2):312.
  22.  22
    Malebranche.T. M. Schmaltz - 2004 - Mind 113 (449):215-218.
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  23.  28
    Discourse-mediation of the mapping between language and the visual world: Eye movements and mental representation.Yuki Kamide Gerry T. M. Altmann - 2009 - Cognition 111 (1):55.
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  24.  12
    Index.T. M. Scanlon - 2008 - In Thomas Scanlon (ed.), Moral dimensions: permissibility, meaning, blame. Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. pp. 243-247.
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  25. Wrongness and Reasons: A Re-examination.T. M. Scanlon - 2007 - In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics. Clarendon Press.
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  26. The appeal and limits of constructivism.T. M. Scanlon - 2012 - In James Lenman & Yonatan Shemmer (eds.), Constructivism in Practical Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  27. Wrongness and Reasons: A Re-examination.T. M. Scanlon - 2007 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 2:5-20.
     
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  28.  17
    Hawthorne on knowledge and practical reasoning.T. M. Crisp - 2005 - Analysis 65 (2):138-140.
  29.  75
    Individual and family decisions about organ donation.T. M. Wilkinson - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):26–40.
    abstract This paper examines, from a philosophical point of view, the ethics of the role of the family and the deceased in decisions about organ retrieval. The paper asks: Who, out of the individual and the family, should have the ultimate power to donate or withhold organs? On the side of respecting the wishes of the deceased individual, the paper considers and rejects arguments by analogy with bequest and from posthumous bodily integrity. It develops an argument for posthumous autonomy based (...)
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  30. Metaphysics and morals.T. M. Scanlon - 2010 - In Mario De Caro & David Macarthur (eds.), Naturalism and Normativity. Cambridge University Press. pp. 7 - 22.
    This essay argues that normative judgments, in general, and moral judgments, in particular, are "truth apt" and can be objects of belief. Other main claims are: judgments about reasons, if interpreted as true, do not have metaphysical implications that are incompatible with a scientific view of the world. Two kinds of normative claims should be distinguished: substantive claims about what reasons people have and structural claims about what attitudes people must have insofar as they are rational. Employing this distinction, the (...)
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  31. Responsibility and the value of choice.T. M. Scanlon - 2013 - Think 12 (33):9-16.
    ExtractImagine that you are struggling to finish a project, with the deadline fast approaching. Nearly done, you are about to print out what you have finished when a dialog box appears on your computer screen telling you that you must download and install an update for some piece of software. Frustrated, you try to make it go away, but it keeps reappearing. So you relent and click on ‘Install’, and your screen is filled with small print listing ‘Terms and Conditions’. (...)
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  32.  25
    Reply to Gauthier and Gibbard.T. M. Scanlon - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (1):176-189.
    I am pleased by the degree of agreement about reasons between the three of us, which is much greater than I might have guessed. I have no objection whatever to the project of giving the kind of psychological description of deliberation about reasons that Gibbard proposes. I agree that “weighing X in favor of A isn’t mysterious,” but I do confess to some doubt about how a psychological description of this process of weighing “explains, indirectly, X’s counting in favor of (...)
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  33.  25
    Presocratic theology.T. M. Robinson - 2008 - In Patricia Curd & Daniel Graham (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Presocratic Philosophy. Oxford University Press USA.
    If in the context of early and classical Greek thought, the term “theology” is taken to mean “of God/gods/the gods and his/their putative relationship, causal and directive, to the world and its operations, and to ourselves within that world,” or something of that order, the first ascription of such a notion to a Presocratic philosopher is to be found in Aristotle's comment that “Thales thought that all things are full of gods”. The Presocratic period ends with no neat causal sequence. (...)
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  34. Rights, goals, and fairness.T. M. Scanlon - 1988 - In Samuel Scheffler (ed.), Consequentialism and its critics. New York: Oxford University Press.
     
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  35.  53
    Metaphysics and Morals.T. M. Scanlon - 2003 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 77 (2):7-22.
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  36.  46
    Counter-Manipulation and Health Promotion.T. M. Wilkinson - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (3):257-266.
    It is generally wrong to manipulate. One leading reason is because manipulation interferes with autonomy, in particular the component of autonomy called ‘independence’, that is, freedom from intentional control by others. Manipulative health promotion would therefore seem wrong. However, manipulative techniques could be used to counter-manipulation, for example, playing on male fears of impotence to counter ‘smoking is sexy’ advertisements. What difference does it make to the ethics of manipulation when it is counter-manipulation? This article distinguishes two powerful defences of (...)
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  37. The Spin-Echo Experiments and the Second Law of Thermodynamics.T. M. Ridderbos & M. L. G. Redhead - 1998 - Foundations of Physics 28 (8):1237-1270.
    We introduce a simple model for so-called spin-echo experiments. We show that the model is a mincing system. On the basis of this model we study fine-grained entropy and coarse-grained entropy descriptions of these experiments. The coarse-grained description is shown to be unable to provide an explanation of the echo signals, as a result of the way in which it ignores dynamically generated correlations. This conclusion is extended to the general debate on the foundations of statistical mechanics. We emphasize the (...)
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  38. Symposium on Amartya Sen's philosophy: 3 Sen and consequentialism.T. M. Scanlon - 2001 - Economics and Philosophy 17 (1):39-50.
    It is a particular pleasure to be able to participate in this symposium in honor of Amartya Sen. We agree on a wide range of topics, but I will focus here on an area of relative disagreement. Sen is much more attracted to consequentialism than I am, and the main topic of my paper will be the particular version of consequentialism that he has articulated and the reasons why he is drawn to this view.
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  39. Justice, Responsibility, and the Demands of Equality.T. M. Scanlon - 2006 - In Christine Sypnowich (ed.), The Egalitarian Conscience: Essays in Honour of G. A. Cohen. Oxford University Press.
  40. Intention and permissibility, I.T. M. Scanlon - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):301–317.
    [T. M. Scanlon] It is clearly impermissible to kill one person because his organs can be used to save five others who are in need of transplants. It has seemed to many that the explanation for this lies in the fact that in such cases we would be intending the death of the person whom we killed, or failed to save. What makes these actions impermissible, however, is not the agent's intention but rather the fact that the benefit envisaged does (...)
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  41.  21
    The Need for Dialogical Encounter: An Account of Christian Parents' Making Decisions on Behalf of Their Severely Handicapped Child.T. M. McConnell & R. A. McConnell - 2014 - Christian Bioethics 20 (3):376-389.
  42.  29
    Research, informed consent, and the limits of disclosure.T. M. Williamson - 2001 - Bioethics 15 (4):341–363.
    According to this paper, respect for informed consent implies that subjects should often be told a good deal more than ethical guidelines explicitly or implicitly require. Unless subjects are informed of the researchers’ personal characteristics, views, and sponsors whenever they would be likely to consider them significant, their autonomy is being overridden. However, overriding subjects’ autonomy is sometimes required by the interests of researchers in not being discriminated against or suffering intrusions into their privacy. This paper resolves the conflict between (...)
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  43. Wrongness and Reasons: A Re-examination.T. M. Scanlon - 2007 - In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics: Volume Ii. Clarendon Press.
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  44.  31
    Intention and Permissibility.T. M. Scanlon & Jonathan Dancy - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74:301-338.
    [T. M. Scanlon] It is clearly impermissible to kill one person because his organs can be used to save five others who are in need of transplants. It has seemed to many that the explanation for this lies in the fact that in such cases we would be intending the death of the person whom we killed, or failed to save. What makes these actions impermissible, however, is not the agent's intention but rather the fact that the benefit envisaged does (...)
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  45. Keeping in touch by electronic mail.T. M. Dobson - 2002 - In Max Van Manen (ed.), Writing in the dark: phenomenological studies in interpretive inquiry. London, Ont.: Althouse Press. pp. 98--115.
     
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  46. Education by any means necessary: An historical exploration of community-based pedagogical spaces for peoples of African descent.T. M. O. Douglas & C. M. Peck - 2013 - Educational Studies: A Jrnl of the American Educ. Studies Assoc 49 (1):67-91.
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  47. Bytʹ chelovekom na zemle.T. M. Dzhafarli - 1968 - [Moskva,: "Mol. gvardii︠a︡,".
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  48. Besedy o kommunisticheskoĭ morali.T. M. Dzhafarli - 1970 - Moskva]: Molodai︠a︡ gvardii︠a︡.
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  49. Two conceptions of conceptualism and nonconceptualism.T. M. Crowther - 2006 - Erkenntnis 65 (2):245-276.
    Though it enjoys widespread support, the claim that perceptual experiences possess nonconceptual content has been vigorously disputed in the recent literature by those who argue that the content of perceptual experience must be conceptual content. Nonconceptualism and conceptualism are often assumed to be well-defined theoretical approaches that each constitute unitary claims about the contents of experience. In this paper I try to show that this implicit assumption is mistaken, and what consequences this has for the debate about perceptual experience. I (...)
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  50.  99
    Thinking harder about nudges.T. M. Wilkinson - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (8):486-486.
    According to much modern social psychology, behavioural economics and common sense, people's actions and beliefs are frequently the result of rapid intuitive thought rather than careful deliberation. Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein, in their influential book, Nudge, synthesised the literature and used it as the basis for numerous policy ideas.1 Not least, they gave the word ‘nudge’ as a handy term to apply to all sorts of ways of taking advantage of people's psychological quirks without coercing or bribing them. But (...)
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