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Tae Wan Kim
Carnegie Mellon University
  1.  37
    Technological Unemployment, Meaning in Life, Purpose of Business, and the Future of Stakeholders.Tae Wan Kim & Alan Scheller-Wolf - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (2):319-337.
    We offer a precautionary account of why business managers should proactively rethink about what kinds of automation firms ought to implement, by exploring two challenges that automation will potentially pose. We engage the current debate concerning whether life without work opportunities will incur a meaning crisis, offering an argument in favor of the position that if technological unemployment occurs, the machine age may be a structurally limited condition for many without work opportunities to have or add meaning to their lives. (...)
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  2.  56
    Rethinking Right: Moral Epistemology in Management Research.Tae Wan Kim & Thomas Donaldson - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (1):5-20.
    Most management researchers pause at the threshold of objective right and wrong. Their hesitation is understandable. Values imply a “subjective,” personal dimension, one that can invite religious and moral interference in research. The dominant epistemological camps of positivism and subjectivism in management stumble over the notion of moral objectivity. Empirical research can study values in human behavior, but hard-headed scientists should not assume that one value can be objectively better than another. In this article, we invite management researchers to rethink (...)
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  3.  77
    Workplace Civility: A Confucian Approach.Tae Wan Kim & Alan Strudler - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (3):557-577.
    We argue that Confucianism makes a fundamental contribution to understanding why civility is necessary for a morally decent workplace. We begin by reviewing some limits that traditional moral theories face in analyzing issues of civility. We then seek to establish a Confucian alternative. We develop the Confucian idea that even in business, humans may be sacred when they observe rituals culturally determined to express particular ceremonial significance. We conclude that managers and workers should understand that there is a broad range (...)
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  4.  10
    Computational Ethics.Edmond Awad, Sydney Levine, Michael Anderson, Susan Leigh Anderson, Vincent Conitzer, M. J. Crockett, Jim A. C. Everett, Theodoros Evgeniou, Alison Gopnik, Julian C. Jamison, Tae Wan Kim, S. Matthew Liao, Michelle N. Meyer, John Mikhail, Kweku Opoku-Agyemang, Jana Schaich Borg, Juliana Schroeder, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Marija Slavkovik & Josh B. Tenenbaum - 2022 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 26 (5):388-405.
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  5.  25
    Why a Right to an Explanation of Algorithmic Decision-Making Should Exist: A Trust-Based Approach.Tae Wan Kim & Bryan R. Routledge - 2022 - Business Ethics Quarterly 32 (1):75-102.
    Businesses increasingly rely on algorithms that are data-trained sets of decision rules and implement decisions with little or no human intermediation. In this article, we provide a philosophical foundation for the claim that algorithmic decision-making gives rise to a “right to explanation.” It is often said that, in the digital era, informed consent is dead. This negative view originates from a rigid understanding that presumes informed consent is a static and complete transaction. Such a view is insufficient, especially when data (...)
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  6.  18
    Hierarchies and Dignity: A Confucian Communitarian Approach.Jessica A. Kennedy, Tae Wan Kim & Alan Strudler - 2016 - Business Ethics Quarterly 26 (4):479-502.
    ABSTRACT:We discuss workers’ dignity in hierarchical organizations. First, we explain why a conflict exists between high-ranking individuals’ authority and low-ranking individuals’ dignity. Then, we ask whether there is any justification that reconciles hierarchical authority with the dignity of workers. We advance a communitarian justification for hierarchical authority, drawing upon Confucianism, which provides that workers can justifiably accept hierarchical authority when it enables a certain type of social functioning critical for the good life of workers and other involved parties. The Confucian (...)
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  7.  28
    Confucian Ethics and Labor Rights.Tae Wan Kim - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (4):565-594.
    ABSTRACT:In this article I inquire into Confucian ethics from a non-ideal stance investigating the complex interaction between Confucian ideals and the reality of the modern workplace. I contend that even Confucian workers who regularly engage in social rites at the workplace have an internal, Confucian reason to appreciate the value of rights at the workplace. I explain, from a Confucian non-ideal perspective, why I disagree with the presumptuous idea that labor rights are necessarily incompatible with Confucian ideals and values. Specifically, (...)
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  8.  17
    Bounded Ethicality and The Principle That “Ought” Implies “Can”.Tae Wan Kim, Rosemarie Monge & Alan Strudler - 2015 - Business Ethics Quarterly 25 (3):341-361.
    ABSTRACT:In this article we investigate a philosophical problem for normative business ethics theory suggested by a phenomenon that contemporary psychologists call “bounded ethicality,” which can be identified with the putative fact that well-intentioned people, constrained by psychological limitations, make ethical choices inconsistent with their own ethical beliefs and commitments. When one combines the idea that bounded ethicality is pervasive with the idea that a person morally ought to do something only if she can, it raises a doubt about the practical (...)
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  9.  17
    Decent Termination in Advance.Tae Wan Kim - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (2):203-227.
    People are often involuntarily laid off from their jobs through no fault of their own. Employees who are dismissed in this manner cannot always legitimately hold employers accountable for these miserable situations because the decision to implement layoffs is often the best possible outcome given the context—that is, layoffs in and of themselves may be “necessary evils.” Yet, even in circumstances in which layoffs qualify as “necessary evils,” morality demands that employers respect the dignity of those whose employment is involuntarily (...)
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  10.  26
    Gamification of Labor and the Charge of Exploitation.Tae Wan Kim - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (1):27-39.
    Recently, business organizations have increasingly turned to a novel form of non-monetary incentives—that is, “gamification,” which refers to a motivation technique using video game elements, such as digital points, badges, and friendly competition in non-game contexts like workplaces. The introduction of gamification to the context of human resource management has immediately become embroiled in serious moral debates. Most notable is the accusation that using gamification as a motivation tool, employers exploit workers. This article offers an in-depth analysis of the moral (...)
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  11.  36
    The “I” in ISCT: Normative and Empirical Facets of Integration.Katherina Glac & Tae Wan Kim - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S4):693-705.
    Integrative social contracts theory is a novel approach to normative questions and has been widely evaluated, discussed, and applied by academics and practitioners alike. While the "I" in ISCT leads the title, it has not received the analytical attention it deserves, especially since the "integrative" component in ISCT is multifaceted and at the conceptual core of the theory. In this paper we therefore take a closer look at two facets of integration. First, we examine the normative integration that takes place (...)
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  12.  40
    Happiness and Virtue Ethics in Business: The Ultimate Value Proposition by Alejo José G. Sison. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. 318 Pp. ISBN: 9781107044630. [REVIEW]Tae Wan Kim - 2016 - Business Ethics Quarterly 26 (2):261-264.
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  13.  14
    Workplace Civility: A Confucian Approach.Tae Wan Kim & Alan Strudler - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (3):557-577.
    We argue that Confucianism makes a fundamental contribution to understanding why civility is necessary for a morally decent workplace. We begin by reviewing some limits that traditional moral theories face in analyzing issues of civility. We then seek to establish a Confucian alternative. We develop the Confucian idea that even in business, humans may be sacred when they observe rituals culturally determined to express particular ceremonial significance. We conclude that managers and workers should understand that there is a broad range (...)
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  14.  6
    Master and Slave: the Dialectic of Human-Artificial Intelligence Engagement.Tae Wan Kim, Fabrizio Maimone, Katherina Pattit, Alejo José Sison & Benito Teehankee - 2021 - Humanistic Management Journal 6 (3):355-371.
    The massive introduction of artificial intelligence has triggered significant societal concerns, ranging from “technological unemployment” and the dominance of algorithms in the work place and in everyday life, among others. While AI is made by humans and is, therefore, dependent on the latter for its purpose, the increasing capabilities of AI to carry out productive activities for humans can lead the latter to unwitting slavish existence. This has become evident, for example, in the area of social media use, where AI (...)
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  15.  9
    Flawed Like Us and the Starry Moral Law: Review of Machines Like Me by Ian McEwan. [REVIEW]Tae Wan Kim - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (4):875-879.
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  16.  2
    Ethics of Split Liver Transplantation: Should a Large Liver Always Be Split If Medically Safe?Tae Wan Kim, John Roberts, Alan Strudler & Sridhar Tayur - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-107400.
    Split liver transplantation provides an opportunity to divide a donor liver, offering transplants to two small patients rather than keeping it whole and providing a transplant to a single larger adult patient. In this article, we attempt to address the following question that is identified by the Organ Procurement and Transplant Network and United Network for Organ Sharing: ‘Should a large liver always be split if medically safe?’ This article aims to defend an answer—‘not always’—and clarify under what circumstances SLT (...)
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