Results for 'Tan Say Beng'

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  1.  8
    Understanding Risk: Psychosis and Genomics Research in Singapore.Ayesha Ahmad, Tamara Lysaght, Liu Jianjun, Mythily Subramaniam, Tan Say Beng & Benjamin Capps - 2012 - Genomics, Society and Policy 8 (2).
    This is an exploratory paper of the ethical implications for genomic research and mental illness with specific reference to Singapore. Singapore has a unique context due to its social and political systems, and although it is a relatively small country, its population is religiously and culturally diverse. The issues that we identify here, therefore, will offer new perspectives and will also shed light on the existing literature on psychiatric genomics in society. We contextualise issues such as risk and stigma in (...)
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  2. Many-Times Huge and Superhuge Cardinals.Julius B. Barbanel, Carlos A. Diprisco & It Beng Tan - 1984 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 49 (1):112-122.
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  3.  6
    Based On The Narration Of Wahb Bın Munabbih, A Mathnawi: Dasıtan-I Erve Hatun.Bünyamin Tan - 2013 - Journal of Turkish Studies 8.
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  4.  4
    Understanding Risk: Psychosis and Genomics Research in Singapore.Benjamin Capps, Tan Say Beng, Mythily Subramaniam, Liu Jianjun, Tamra Lysaght & Ayesha Ahmad - 2012 - Genomics, Society and Policy 8 (2):1-14.
    This is an exploratory paper of the ethical implications for genomic research and mental illness with specific reference to Singapore. Singapore has a unique context due to its social and political systems, and although it is a relatively small country, its population is religiously and culturally diverse. The issues that we identify here, therefore, will offer new perspectives and will also shed light on the existing literature on psychiatric genomics in society. We contextualise issues such as risk and stigma in (...)
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  5.  69
    How Meaning Moves: Tan Sitong on Borrowing Across Cultures.Leigh K. Jenco - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (1):92-113.
    This essay offers an attempt at a cross-cultural inquiry into cross-cultural inquiry by examining how one influential Chinese reformer, Tan Sitong (1865–1898), thought creatively about the possibilities of learning from differently situated societies. That is to say, rather than focusing on developing either Tan’s substantive ideas or elaborating a methodology for how such an approach might proceed, I mine his work for the methodological lessons it offers. I hope to offer both argument and example for the possibility not only that (...)
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  6. Tan Luan's Doctrine of Amitabha.Min Chen - 2003 - Philosophy and Culture 30 (7):33-50.
    This paper mainly discusses Tan Luan Amitabha created the theory of the nature of salvation. Gein Tan Luan force first proposed trust him, and so as "easy street" and "hard track" distinction, this emphasis on his ability to say, and the traditional Buddhist emphasis on self-liberation is different, each being misunderstood as a Buddhist heresy; but the two kinds of Tan Luan body of law that, on the one hand Chengji Long said the tree two more from the thinking Bian (...)
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  7.  16
    An Examination of the Effect of CEO Social Ties and CEO Reputation on Nonprofessional Investors’ Say-on-Pay Judgments.Steven E. Kaplan, Janet A. Samuels & Jeffrey Cohen - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (1):103-117.
    CEO compensation has received much attention from both academics and regulators. However, academics have given scant attention to understanding judgments about CEO compensation by third parties such as investors. Our study contributes to the ethics literature on CEO compensation by examining whether judgments about CEO compensation are influenced by two aspects of a company’s tone at the top—social ties between the CEO and members of the Executive Compensation Committee and the CEO’s Reputation, particularly for financial reporting and disclosures. Although, stock (...)
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  8.  29
    The Liberal Teachings of the Young Liang Qichao.Feng Qi - 1990 - Chinese Studies in Philosophy 22 (1):32.
    During the period of the Wushu "Hundred-Days" Reform, modern Chinese philosophy stepped into the stage of development characterized by the growth and spread of the theory of evolution and of humanism. Kang Youwei, Yan Fu, Tan Sitong, and Liang Qichao were the representative figures of this stage. At the time, with a tremendous flair for vivid and persuasive writing, the young Liang Qichao broke through the bonds of feudal autocracy with the ideas of humanism, used "liberty" to oppose "slavishness," and, (...)
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  9. Janglican: National Literatures in the Age of Globalization.Ihab Hassan - 2010 - Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):271-280.
    In Finnegans Wake, the uncouth portmanteau word "Janglish" suggests a jangled kind of English. Joyce, of course, lived and died before that other uncouth word, "globalization," rode the waves of cyberspace. By resorting to a dubious conceit, I use "Janglican" to invoke American letters on the tongue of writers like Junot Diaz, Amy Tan, Aleksander Hemon, Ha Jin, Jhumpa Lahiri, Chang-rae Lee, among many others (including this writer, who speaks every language with an accent, a literary feat of sorts.)There's no (...)
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  10.  52
    Grande Sertão: Veredas by João Guimarães Rosa.Felipe W. Martinez, Nancy Fumero & Ben Segal - 2013 - Continent 3 (1):27-43.
    INTRODUCTION BY NANCY FUMERO What is a translation that stalls comprehension? That, when read, parsed, obfuscates comprehension through any language – English, Portuguese. It is inevitable that readers expect fidelity from translations. That language mirror with a sort of precision that enables the reader to become of another location, condition, to grasp in English in a similar vein as readers of Portuguese might from João Guimarães Rosa’s GRANDE SERTÃO: VEREDAS. There is the expectation that translations enable mobility. That what was (...)
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  11.  18
    Desafios de la teología del pluralismo religioso a la fe tradicional.José María Vigil - 2005 - Horizonte 4 (7):30-50.
    La “Teología del pluralismo religioso” (TPR) no es una teología “sectorial”, o “de genitivo”, que teologizara temas nuevos dentro de la “universa theologia”. O sea, la TPR no agranda cuantitativamente el campo de la teología. Hace su aportación, pero cualitativamente: trata los mismos temas, pero bajo una luz distinta, con otra pertinencia, otro “objeto formal”. Es una teología que replantea todo desde otra perspectiva, con otro ordenamiento, a partir de otro “paradigma”. Por eso, los desafíos de esta teología son fuertes. (...)
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  12. Elocuencia Estoica Y Persuasión Ciceroniana: Discurso Veraz Vs Discurso Inverosímil.Catalina Gonzalez - 2011 - Episteme NS: Revista Del Instituto de Filosofía de la Universidad Central de Venezuela 31 (2):171-191.
    En De Oratore y otros escritos, Cicerón critica la retórica de los estoicos. Afirma que su elocuencia es “confusa, oscura, árida y cortada” y que sus tratados de retórica sirven más “para aprender a callar” que para aprender a hablar persuasivamente. ¿Qué decían los estoicos de la retórica para que Cicerón tenga sus preceptos en tan baja estima? En este trabajo exploro el problema, con miras a entender los fundamentos psicológicos y epistemológicos de la concepción estoica de la retórica y (...)
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  13. What’s Wrong with “You Say You’Re Happy, but…” Reasoning?Jason Marsh - forthcoming - In David Wasserman & Adam Cureton (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Disability. Oxford University Press.
    Disability-positive philosophers often note a troubling tendency to dismiss what disabled people say about their well-being. This chapter seeks to get clearer on why this tendency might be troubling. It argues that recent appeals to lived experience, testimonial injustice, and certain challenges to adaptive-preference reasoning do not fully explain what is wrong with questioning the happiness of disabled people. It then argues that common attempts to debunk the claim that disabled people are happy are worrisome because they threaten everyone’s well-being (...)
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  14. What Does It Mean to Say That Logic is Formal?John MacFarlane - 2000 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    Much philosophy of logic is shaped, explicitly or implicitly, by the thought that logic is distinctively formal and abstracts from material content. The distinction between formal and material does not appear to coincide with the more familiar contrasts between a priori and empirical, necessary and contingent, analytic and synthetic—indeed, it is often invoked to explain these. Nor, it turns out, can it be explained by appeal to schematic inference patterns, syntactic rules, or grammar. What does it mean, then, to say (...)
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  15.  4
    What Does It Mean to Say That We Are Animals?E. T. Olson - 2015 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 22 (11-12):84-107.
    The view that we are animals -- animalism -- is often mis-understood. It is typically stated in unhelpful or misleading ways. Debates over animalism are often unclear about what question it purports to answer, and what the alternative answers are. The paper tries to state clearly what animalism says and does not say. This enables us to distinguish different versions of animalism.
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  16. Presentists May Say Goodbye to A-Properties.Joshua Rasmussen - 2012 - Analysis 72 (2):270-276.
    Philosophers of time say that if presentism is true (i.e. if reality is comprised solely of presently existing things), then a complete description of reality must contain tensed terms, such as ‘was’, ‘presently is’ and ‘will be’. I counter this viewpoint by explaining how the presentist may de-tense our talk about times. I argue, furthermore, that, since the A-theory of time denies the success of any such de-tensing strategy, presentism is not a version of the A-theory – contrary to the (...)
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  17.  48
    When Doctors Say No: The Battleground of Medical Futility.Susan B. Rubin - 1998 - Indiana University Press.
    Who should decide? In When Doctors Say No, philosopher and bioethicist Rubin examines this controversial issue.
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  18. What Do Our Critical Practices Say About the Nature of Morality?Charlie Kurth - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 166 (1):45-64.
    A prominent argument for moral realism notes that we are inclined to accept realism in science because scientific inquiry supports a robust set of critical practices—error, improvement, explanation, and the like. It then argues that because morality displays a comparable set of critical practices, a claim to moral realism is just as warranted as a claim to scientific realism. But the argument is only as strong as its central analogy—and here there is trouble. If the analogy between the critical practices (...)
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  19. The Supposed Right to a Democratic Say.Richard J. Arneson - unknown
    Democratic instrumentalism is the combination of two ideas. One is instrumentalism regarding political arrangements: the form of government that ought to be instituted and sustained in a political society is the one the consequences of whose operation would be better than those of any feasible alternative. The second idea is the claim that under modern conditions democratic political institutions would be best according to the instrumentalist norm and ought to be established. “Democratic instrumentalism” is not a catchy political slogan apt (...)
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  20.  24
    H. C. For Life, That is to Say..Jacques Derrida - 2006 - Stanford University Press.
    H. C. for Life, That Is to Say... is Derrida's literary critical recollection of his lifelong friendship with Hélène Cixous. The main figure that informs Derrida's reading here is that of "taking sides." While Hélène Cixous in her life and work takes the side of life, "for life," Derrida admits always feeling drawn to the side of death. Rather than being an obvious choice, taking the side of life is an act of faith, by wagering one's life on life. H. (...)
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  21. On Gödel Sentences and What They Say.Peter Milne - 2007 - Philosophia Mathematica 15 (2):193-226.
    Proofs of Gödel's First Incompleteness Theorem are often accompanied by claims such as that the gödel sentence constructed in the course of the proof says of itself that it is unprovable and that it is true. The validity of such claims depends closely on how the sentence is constructed. Only by tightly constraining the means of construction can one obtain gödel sentences of which it is correct, without further ado, to say that they say of themselves that they are unprovable (...)
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  22. The Availability of What We Say.Jerry A. Fodor & Jerrold J. Katz - 1963 - Philosophical Review 72 (1):57-71.
    Fodor and katz criticize cavell's position on the relation between ordinary language philosophy and empirical investigations of ordinary language, In "must we mean what we say?," _inquiry, Volume 1, Pages 172-212, And "the availability of wittgenstein's later philosophy," "philosophical review", Volume 71, Pages 67-93. Cavell holds that disagreements between ordinary language philosophers over grammar and semantics are in no sense empirical. Fodor and katz show that ordinary language philosophers are engaged in empirical investigation. (staff).
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  23.  39
    You Can Say What You Think: Vindicating the Effability of Our Thoughts.Delia Belleri - 2014 - Synthese 191 (18):4431-4450.
    The thesis of Ineffability has it that no proposition can be fully expressed by a sentence, this meaning that no sentence-type, or even sentence-token whose indexicality and ambiguities have been resolved, can fully encode a proposition. The thesis of the propositionality of thoughts has it that thoughts are propositional. An implication of the joint endorsement of these two theses is that thoughts are ineffable. The aim of this paper is to argue that this is not the case: there are effable (...)
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  24.  23
    What Does the Patient Say? Levinas and Medical Ethics.Lawrence Burns - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (2):214-235.
    The patient–physician relationship is of primary importance for medical ethics, but it also teaches broader lessons about ethics generally. This is particularly true for the philosopher Emmanuel Levinas whose ethics is grounded in the other who “faces” the subject and whose suffering provokes responsibility. Given the pragmatic, situational character of Levinasian ethics, the “face of the other” may be elucidated by an analogy with the “face of the patient.” To do so, I draw on examples from Martin Winckler’s fictional physician (...)
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  25. Why We Can’T Say What Animals Think.Jacob Beck - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 26 (4):520–546.
    Realists about animal cognition confront a puzzle. If animals have real, contentful cognitive states, why can’t anyone say precisely what the contents of those states are? I consider several possible resolutions to this puzzle that are open to realists, and argue that the best of these is likely to appeal to differences in the format of animal cognition and human language.
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  26.  48
    Wanting to Say Something: Aspect-Blindness and Language.William Day - 2010 - In William Day & Víctor J. Krebs (eds.), Seeing Wittgenstein Anew. Cambridge University Press.
    "Lest one think that the focus on aspect-seeing in Wittgenstein is only a means to more contemporary philosophical ends, one ought to read Day’s remarkable 'Wanting to Say Something: Aspect-Blindness and Language'. Day considers the issue of aspect-blindness, arguing that universal aspect-blindness is impossible for beings with language. Specifically, he shows that a child’s first attempt at language, at trying “bloh” for “ball,” is neither an indication that the child sees the ball for the first time, nor an indication that (...)
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  27. Say Reports, Assertion Events and Meaning Dimensions.Adrian Brasoveanu & Donka F. Farkas - manuscript
    In this paper, we study the parameters that come into play when assessing the truth conditions of say reports and contrast them with belief attributions. We argue that these conditions are sensitive in intricate ways to the connection between the interpretation of the complement of say and the properties of the reported speech act. There are three general areas this exercise is relevant to, besides the immediate issue of understanding the meaning of say: (i) the discussion shows the need to (...)
     
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  28.  42
    The Bloomsbury Handbook of Chinese Philosophy Methodologies Ed. By Sorhoon Tan.Jeremy Huang Zujie - 2018 - Philosophy East and West 68 (2):656-659.
    The Bloomsbury Handbook of Chinese Philosophy Methodologies is the third entry of the Bloomsbury Research Handbook in Asian Philosophy series. Editor Sor-hoon Tan begins the Handbook with a historical journey starting from Hegel's insistence that "Chinese philosophy" is not really philosophy; through Hu Shih's and Fung Yulan's groundbreaking attempts in the early twentieth century to revise traditional Chinese thought using Western methods; and up to more current discussions on the question of whether there is such a thing as "Chinese philosophy." (...)
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  29. ‘What It Makes Sense to Say’: Wittgenstein, Rule‐Following and the Nature of Education.Nicholas C. Burbules & Richard Smith - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (3):425–430.
    In his writings Jim Marshall has helpfully emphasized such Wittgensteinian themes as the multiplicity of language games, the deconstruction of ‘certainty,’ and the contexts of power that underlie discursive systems. Here we focus on another important legacy of Wittgenstein's thinking: his insistence that human activity is rule‐governed. This idea foregrounds looking carefully at the world of education and learning, as against the empirical search for new psychological or other facts. It reminds us that we need to consider, in Peter Winch's (...)
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  30.  39
    More on What We Say.Stanley Bates & Ted Cohen - 1972 - Metaphilosophy 3 (1):1–24.
    This article consists of two important parts. The first is a specific defense of some of the central claims made by stanley cavell in "must we mean what we say" against the criticisms of fodor and katz in "the availability of what we say." the major issue concerns the question of whether evidence of some sort is needed to support a claim by a native speaker about what we mean when we say something. Further speculations on this topic occupy the (...)
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  31.  12
    Introduction to the French Edition of Must We Mean What We Say?Sandra Laugier - 2011 - Critical Inquiry 37 (4):627-651.
    Must We Mean What We Say? is Stanley Cavell's first book, and, in a sense, it is his most important. It contains all the themes that Cavell continues to develop masterfully throughout his philosophy. There is a renewed usage of J. L. Austin's theory of speech acts, and, in the classic essay “The Availability of Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy,” he establishes the foundations of a radical reading of Ludwig Wittgenstein , the connections among skepticism, acknowledgement, and Shakespearean tragedy ; there is (...)
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  32.  15
    Is Contemporary Chinese Society Inhumane? What Mencius and Empirical Psychology Have to Say.Wenqing Zhao - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):343-360.
    This essay discusses the tragic news story of a Chinese toddler, Xiao Yueyue 小悅悅, in light of Mencius’ ethical philosophy and modern studies of moral psychology, which help in understanding the problem of passive bystanders that has long vexed the Chinese public. Mencius never said that every person would act to help when a child is in danger; he did not even say that people would feel sympathetic for every child in a real life dangerous situation. He simply asserted the (...)
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  33.  74
    "Listen to What You Say": Rwanda's Postgenocide Language Policies.Lynne Tirrell - 2015 - New England Journal of Public Policy 27 (4).
    Freedom of expression is considered a basic human right, and yet most countries have restrictions on speech they deem harmful. Following the genocide of the Tutsi, Rwanda passed a constitution (2003) and laws against hate speech and other forms of divisionist language (2008, 2013). Understanding how language shaped “recognition harms” that both constitute and fuel genocide also helps account for political decisions to limit “divisionist” discourse. When we speak, we make expressive commitments, which are commitments to the viability and value (...)
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  34.  73
    Does Hegel Have Anything to Say to Modern Mathematical Philosophy?Alan L. T. Paterson - 2002 - Idealistic Studies 32 (2):143-158.
    This paper argues that Hegel has much to say to modern mathematical philosophy, although the Hegelian perspective needs to be substantially developed to incorporate within it the extensive advances in post-Hegelian mathematics and its logic. Key to that perspective is the self-referential character of the fundamental concepts of philosophy. The Hegelian approach provides a framework for answering the philosophical problems, discussed by Kurt Gödel in his paper on Bertrand Russell, which arise out of the existence in mathematics of self-referential, non-constructive (...)
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  35.  13
    Is There Any Good Reason to Say Goodbye to “Ethnomethodology”?Louis Quéré - 2012 - Human Studies 35 (2):305-325.
    This paper is an essay about Harold Garfinkel's heritage. It outlines a response to Eric Livingston's proposal to say goodbye to ethnomethodology as pertaining to the sociological tradition; and it rejects part of Melvin Pollner's diagnosis about the changes occurred in ethnomethodological working. If it agrees with Pollner about the idea that something of the initial ethnomethodology's program has been left aside after the "work studies" turn, it asserts that such a turn has nonetheless made possible authentic discoveries. So the (...)
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  36.  89
    Kok-Chor Tan, Justice, Institutions, and Luck: The Site, Ground, and Scope of Equality , Pp. Ix + 208. [REVIEW]Daniel Halliday - 2013 - Utilitas 25 (1):121-132.
    ExtractPolitical liberals very often appeal to a so-called division of moral labour that separates the regulation of institutions from that of personal conduct. Probably the most famous statement of this idea is found in these remarks from John Rawls: The principles of justice for institutions must not be confused with the principles which apply to individuals and their actions in particular circumstances. These two kinds of principles apply to different subjects and must be discussed separately., p. 47) Kok-Chor Tan's excellent (...)
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  37.  9
    The Pitfalls of Misreading: What Does “Industry Funding of Medical Education” Actually Say?Bethany Spielman - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (1):24-25.
    (2010). The Pitfalls of Misreading: What Does “Industry Funding of Medical Education” Actually Say? The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 24-25.
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  38. What Science Can and Cannot Say: The Problems with Methodological Naturalism.Reed Richter - 2002 - Reports of the National Center for Science Education 22 (Jan-Apr 2002):18-22.
    This paper rejects a view of science called "methodological naturalism." -/- According to many defenders of mainstream science and Darwinian evolution, anti-evolution critics--creationists and intelligent design proponents--are conceptually and epistemologically confusing science and religion, a supernatural view of world. These defenders of evolution contend that doing science requires adhering to a methodology that is strictly and essentially naturalistic: science is essentially committed to "methodological naturalism" and assumes that all the phenomena it investigates are entirely natural and consistent with the laws (...)
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  39.  76
    Must We Mean What We Say?Anthony Coleman - 2003 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 11 (1):114-115.
    Must We Mean What We Say?, Stanley Cavell's first book, has been recently rereleased with a new preface by the author. The book is a collection of essays spanning a twelve-year period, ranging in topic from the ‘ordinary language’ procedures of Austin and Wittgenstein to interpretations of literary works by Beckett and Shakespeare. It was originally published in 1969, yet it contains much that is still relevant for contemporary philosophy. Indeed, it could be argued that there is as much to (...)
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  40.  38
    What Should We Say?Herman Tennessen - 1959 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 2 (1-4):265 – 290.
    Preliminary summaries of a few empirio?semantical investigations1 concerning such sentences as: can we say x, should we ever (ordinarily) say x, x is self?evident (tautological, contradictory, nonsensical), P does not know what be is talking about, x is voluntary (involuntary) and: that is no excuse.
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  41.  53
    What Might We Say About a Circular Economy? Some Temptations to Avoid If Possible.Webster Ken - 2013 - World Futures 69 (7-8):542-554.
    (2013). What Might We Say about a Circular Economy? Some Temptations to Avoid if Possible. World Futures: Vol. 69, Reclaiming Free Enterprise: The Scientific and Human Story, pp. 542-554.
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  42.  78
    Say What? On Grice On What Is Said.Luca Baptista - 2014 - European Journal of Philosophy 22 (1):1-19.
    : In this paper I argue that there is a very important, though often neglected, dissimilarity between the two Gricean conceptions of ‘what is said’: the one presented in his William James Lectures and the one sketched in the ‘Retrospective Epilogue’ to his book Studies in the Way of Words. The main problem lies with the idea of speakers' commitment to what they say and how this is to be related to the conventional, or standard, meaning of the sentences uttered (...)
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  43.  20
    XI—Naturalism and Placement, or, What Should a Good Quinean Say About Mathematical and Moral Truth?Mary Leng - 2016 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 116 (3):237-260.
    What should a Quinean naturalist say about moral and mathematical truth? If Quine’s naturalism is understood as the view that we should look to natural science as the ultimate ‘arbiter of truth’, this leads rather quickly to what Huw Price has called ‘placement problems’ of placing moral and mathematical truth in an empirical scientific world-view. Against this understanding of the demands of naturalism, I argue that a proper understanding of the reasons Quine gives for privileging ‘natural science’ as authoritative when (...)
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  44.  35
    Democracy and Political Economy: Tocqueville's Thoughts on J.-B. Say and T.R. Malthus.Michael Drolet - 2003 - History of European Ideas 29 (2):159-181.
    This essay examines the intellectual origins of Tocqueville's thoughts on political economy. It argues that Tocqueville believed political economy was crucial to what he called the ‘new science of politics’, and it explores his first forays into the discipline by examining his studies of J.-B. Say and T.R. Malthus. The essay shows how Tocqueville was initially attracted to Say's approach as it provided him with a rigorous analytical framework with which to examine American democracy. Though he incorporated important aspects of (...)
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  45.  14
    Representing What Others Say.Cara Spencer - 2002 - ProtoSociology 17:26-45.
    The semantics of belief reports has recently received a great deal of attention.1 Speech reports have largely been left behind in this discussion. Here I extend a familiar recent account of attitude reports, the Russellian theory, to the special case of speech reports. I then consider how it compares to Davidson’s paratactic theory with respect to a few examples that raise special problems about speech reports. Neither theory accounts for everything we want to say about these cases. I suggest that (...)
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  46.  17
    Transculturalism in Tan Twan Eng’s The Gift of Rain.Wen Lee Ng, Manimangai Mani & Wan Roselezam Wan Yahya - 2016 - International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences 74:1-15.
    Publication date: 30 November 2016 Source: Author: Wen Lee Ng, Manimangai Mani, Wan Roselezam Wan Yahya While the growing body of research on Tan Twan Eng’s The Gift of Rain focuses on the protagonist, Philip Hutton’s traumatic condition, his Chinese identity, and his ambiguous identity, this study devotes particular attention to the complexity of interactions between various cultures practised by Philip. This study aims to address this gap by applying the concept of transculturalism to analyse the processes of acquiring a (...)
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  47.  19
    Can Luck Egalitarianism Serve as a Basis for Distributive Justice? A Critique of Kok-Chor Tan’s Institutional Luck Egalitarianism.Akira Inoue - 2016 - Law and Philosophy 35 (4):391-414.
    This paper examines whether Kok-Chor Tan’s institutional luck egalitarianism is successful as a pluralist luck egalitarian theory of justice and morality. In recent years, pluralist luck egalitarianism has become a salient theory of justice. Tan’s pluralist proposal for institutional luck egalitarianism is attractive because it seems to refute the metaphysical and practical challenges against luck egalitarianism. This paper demonstrates that, although Tan’s institutional luck egalitarianism is indeed a most sophisticated systematic pluralist theory of justice and morality, his argument fails because (...)
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  48.  25
    The Right to Say Everything.Kevin Hart - 2004 - The European Legacy 9 (1):7-17.
    Can one say everything? Does one have the right to say everything? This essay distinguishes these two questions, and seeks to clarify them with reference to two French writers for whom the questions are central: Maurice Blanchot and Jacques Derrida. Blanchot considers the questions with respect to the Marquis de Sade and Louis?René des Fore?ts. For Blanchot, the right to say everything is not supported by an appeal to the integrity of the self; rather, it is linked to a kenosis (...)
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  49.  40
    Too Soon to Say.Edward James - 2012 - Philosophy 87 (3):421-442.
    (1) Rupert Read charges that Rawls culpably overlooks the politicized Euthyphro: Do we accept our political perspective because it is right or is it right because we accept it? (2) This charge brings up the question of the deficiency dilemma: Do others disagree with us because of our failures or theirs? —where the two dilemmas appear to be independent of each other and lead to the questions of the logic of deficiency, moral epistemic deficiency, epistemic peers, and the hardness of (...)
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    What Do International Ethics Guidelines Say in Terms of the Scope of Medical Research Ethics?Rosemarie D. L. C. Bernabe, Ghislaine J. M. W. van Thiel & Johannes J. M. van Delden - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-18.
    BackgroundIn research ethics, the most basic question would always be, “which is an ethical issue, which is not?” Interestingly, depending on which ethics guideline we consult, we may have various answers to this question. Though we already have several international ethics guidelines for biomedical research involving human participants, ironically, we do not have a harmonized document which tells us what these various guidelines say and shows us the areas of consensus. In this manuscript, we attempted to do just that.MethodsWe extracted (...)
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