7 found
Order:
  1.  36
    Introduction: Sharing Data in a Medical Information Commons.Amy L. McGuire, Mary A. Majumder, Angela G. Villanueva, Jessica Bardill, Juli M. Bollinger, Eric Boerwinkle, Tania Bubela, Patricia A. Deverka, Barbara J. Evans, Nanibaa' A. Garrison, David Glazer, Melissa M. Goldstein, Henry T. Greely, Scott D. Kahn, Bartha M. Knoppers, Barbara A. Koenig, J. Mark Lambright, John E. Mattison, Christopher O'Donnell, Arti K. Rai, Laura L. Rodriguez, Tania Simoncelli, Sharon F. Terry, Adrian M. Thorogood, Michael S. Watson, John T. Wilbanks & Robert Cook-Deegan - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (1):12-20.
    Drawing on a landscape analysis of existing data-sharing initiatives, in-depth interviews with expert stakeholders, and public deliberations with community advisory panels across the U.S., we describe features of the evolving medical information commons. We identify participant-centricity and trustworthiness as the most important features of an MIC and discuss the implications for those seeking to create a sustainable, useful, and widely available collection of linked resources for research and other purposes.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  7
    Making the Case Against Gene Patents.Tania Simoncelli & Sandra S. Park - 2015 - Perspectives on Science 23 (1):106-145.
  3.  15
    Dangerous Excursions: The Case Against Expanding Forensic DNA Databases to Innocent Persons.Tania Simoncelli - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (2):390-397.
    Recent expansions of federal and state law enforcement databanks to include DNA samples and profiles of innocent persons threaten individual privacy, impose unjustifiable costs on society, and may undermine our pursuit of justice. The move to permanently retain DNA from arrestees and proposals for a universal database should be vigorously opposed on matters of principle, legality, and practicality.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  4.  14
    California's Proposition 69: A Dangerous Precedent for Criminal DNA Databases.Tania Simoncelli & Barry Steinhardt - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):279-293.
    On November 2, 2004, California voters approved Proposition 69, “The DNA Fingerprint, Unsolved Crime, and Innocence Protection Act” by a margin of approximately 60 to 40 percent. Given the limited amount of information provided to voters during the initiative process, it is unclear how many of the yea-sayers were apprised of the full implications of this measure. Indeed, by voting “yes” on Proposition 69, California has elected to house the most radical and costly state criminal DNA database in the country. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  5.  17
    Dangerous Excursions: The Case Against Expanding Forensic DNA Databases to Innocent Persons.Tania Simoncelli - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (2):390-397.
    Recent expansions of federal and state law enforcement databanks to include DNA samples and profiles of innocent persons threaten individual privacy, impose unjustifiable costs on society, and may undermine our pursuit of justice. The move to permanently retain DNA from arrestees and proposals for a universal database should be vigorously opposed on matters of principle, legality, and practicality.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  6.  10
    California's Proposition 69: A Dangerous Precedent for Criminal DNA Databases.Tania Simoncelli & Barry Steinhardt - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):279-293.
    On November 2, 2004, California voters elected to radically expand their state criminal DNA database through the passage of Proposition 69. The approved ballot initiative authorized DNA collection and retention from all felons, any individuals with past felony convictions – including juveniles – and, beginning in 2009, all adults arrested for any felony offense. This dramatic database expansion threatens civil liberties and establishes a dangerous precedent for U.S. criminal databases.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  7.  11
    California's Proposition 69: A Dangerous Precedent for Criminal DNA Databases.Tania Simoncelli & Barry Steinhardt - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (2):199-213.
    On November 2, 2004, California voters elected to radically expand their state criminal DNA database through the passage of Proposition 69. The approved ballot initiative authorized DNA collection and retention from all felons, any individuals with past felony convictions – including juveniles – and, beginning in 2009, all adults arrested for any felony offense. This dramatic database expansion threatens civil liberties and establishes a dangerous precedent for U.S. criminal databases.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark