Results for 'Tayla Greene'

815 found
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  1.  71
    On the Nature of the Evolutionary Process: The Correspondence Between Theodosius Dobzhansky and John C. Greene[REVIEW]John C. Greene & Michael Ruse - 1996 - Biology and Philosophy 11 (4):445-491.
    This is the correspondence (1959–1969), on the nature of the evolutionary process, between the biologist Theodosius Dobzhansky and the historian John C. Greene.
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  2. A Light in Dark Times Maxine Greene and the Unfinished Conversation.Maxine Greene, William Ayers & Janet L. Miller - 1998
     
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  3.  3
    Association Between Single-Parent Family Structure and Age of Sexual Debut Among Young Persons in Jamaica.Daniel C. Oshi, Jordan Mckenzie, Martin Baxter, Royelle Robinson, Stephan Neil, Tayla Greene, Wayne Wright & Jeorghino Lodge - 2019 - Journal of Biosocial Science 51 (2):177-187.
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  4.  58
    Graham Greene on the Moral Significance of Violence.Graham Greene - 2009 - The Chesterton Review 35 (1/2):279-282.
  5.  30
    Graham Greene on the IRA.Graham Greene - 2003 - The Chesterton Review 29 (1/2):232-233.
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  6.  25
    Graham Greene on Chesterton.Graham Greene - 2007 - The Chesterton Review 33 (3/4):724-727.
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  7. History, Humanity, and Evolution Essays for John C. Greene.John C. Greene & James R. Moore - 1989
  8.  25
    Graham Greene on Interrogation Methods in Ulster.Graham Greene & Christopher Hawtree - 2003 - The Chesterton Review 29 (1/2):230-232.
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  9.  15
    Greene (From Page One).Maxine Greene - 1991 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 8 (3):17-22.
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  10.  5
    Comment by Murray Greene.Murray Greene - 1970 - Proceedings of the Hegel Society of America 1:111-115.
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  11.  6
    Greene.Maxine Greene - 1991 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 8 (3):17-22.
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  12. Finding Faults: How Moral Dilemmas Illuminate Cognitive Structure.Joshua D. Greene - unknown
    In philosophy, a debate can live forever. Nowhere is this more evident than in ethics, a field that is fueled by apparently intractable dilemmas. To promote the wellbeing of many, may we sacrifice the rights of a few? If our actions are predetermined, can we be held responsible for them? Should people be judged on their intentions alone, or also by the consequences of their behavior? Is failing to prevent someone’s death as blameworthy as actively causing it? For generations, questions (...)
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  13.  57
    Visual–Auditory Events: Cross-Modal Perceptual Priming and Recognition Memory.Anthony J. Greene, Randolph D. Easton & Lisa S. R. LaShell - 2001 - Consciousness and Cognition 10 (3):425-435.
    Modality specificity in priming is taken as evidence for independent perceptual systems. However, Easton, Greene, and Srinivas (1997) showed that visual and haptic cross-modal priming is comparable in magnitude to within-modal priming. Where appropriate, perceptual systems might share like information. To test this, we assessed priming and recognition for visual and auditory events, within- and across- modalities. On the visual test, auditory study resulted in no priming. On the auditory priming test, visual study resulted in priming that was only (...)
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  14. How Moral Dilemmas Illuminate Cognitive Structure.Joshua D. Greene - unknown
    In philosophy, a debate can live forever. Nowhere is this more evident than in ethics, a field that is fueled by apparently intractable dilemmas. To promote the wellbeing of many, may we sacrifice the rights of a few? If our actions are predetermined, can we be held responsible for them? Should people be judged on their intentions alone, or also by the consequences of their behavior? Is failing to prevent someone’s death as blameworthy as actively causing it? For generations, questions (...)
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  15.  21
    Implicit Analogy: New Direct Evidence and a Challenge to the Theory of Memory.Anthony J. Greene - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):388-388.
    The authors propose that analogical reasoning may be achieved without conscious or explicit deliberation. The argument would be strengthened by more convincingly demonstrating instances of analogy that do not require explicit deliberation. Recent findings demonstrate that deliberative or explicit strategies are not necessary for flexible expression under novel circumstances (Greene et al. 2001) to include analogical transfer (Gross & Greene 2007). This issue is particularly critical because the existence of relational priming poses a serious challenge to the widely (...)
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  16. Logical Fictions in Medieval Literature and Philosophy.Virginie Greene - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    In the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, new ways of storytelling and inventing fictions appeared in the French-speaking areas of Europe. This new art still influences our global culture of fiction. Virginie Greene explores the relationship between fiction and the development of neo-Aristotelian logic during this period through a close examination of seminal literary and philosophical texts by major medieval authors, such as Anselm of Canterbury, Abélard, and Chrétien de Troyes. This study of Old French logical fictions encourages a broader (...)
     
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  17. Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them.Joshua Greene - 2013 - Penguin Press.
    Our brains were designed for tribal life, for getting along with a select group of others and for fighting off everyone else. But modern times have forced the world’s tribes into a shared space, resulting in epic clashes of values along with unprecedented opportunities. As the world shrinks, the moral lines that divide us become more salient and more puzzling. We fight over everything from tax codes to gay marriage to global warming, and we wonder where, if at all, we (...)
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  18. How Does Moral Judgment Work?Joshua Greene & Jonathan Haidt - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (12):517-523.
  19. Pushing Moral Buttons: The Interaction Between Personal Force and Intention in Moral Judgment.Joshua D. Greene, Fiery A. Cushman, Lisa E. Stewart, Kelly Lowenberg, Leigh E. Nystrom & Jonathan D. Cohen - 2009 - Cognition 111 (3):364-371.
  20.  70
    Cognitive Load Selectively Interferes with Utilitarian Moral Judgment.Joshua D. Greene, Sylvia A. Morelli, Kelly Lowenberg, Leigh E. Nystrom & Jonathan D. Cohen - 2008 - Cognition 107 (3):1144-1154.
  21. The Secret Joke of Kant’s Soul.Joshua Greene - 2007 - In W. Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Moral Psychology, Vol. 3. MIT Press.
    In this essay, I draw on Haidt’s and Baron’s respective insights in the service of a bit of philosophical psychoanalysis. I will argue that deontological judgments tend to be driven by emotional responses, and that deontological philosophy, rather than being grounded in moral reasoning, is to a large extent3 an exercise in moral rationalization. This is in contrast to consequentialism, which, I will argue, arises from rather different psychological processes, ones that are more “cognitive,” and more likely to involve genuine (...)
     
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  22. Beyond Point-and-Shoot Morality: Why Cognitive (Neuro)Science Matters for Ethics.Joshua D. Greene - 2014 - Ethics 124 (4):695-726.
    In this article I explain why cognitive science (including some neuroscience) matters for normative ethics. First, I describe the dual-process theory of moral judgment and briefly summarize the evidence supporting it. Next I describe related experimental research examining influences on intuitive moral judgment. I then describe two ways in which research along these lines can have implications for ethics. I argue that a deeper understanding of moral psychology favors certain forms of consequentialism over other classes of normative moral theory. I (...)
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  23. Reflection and Reasoning in Moral Judgment.Joshua D. Greene - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (1):163-177.
    While there is much evidence for the influence of automatic emotional responses on moral judgment, the roles of reflection and reasoning remain uncertain. In Experiment 1, we induced subjects to be more reflective by completing the Cognitive Reflection Test prior to responding to moral dilemmas. This manipulation increased utilitarian responding, as individuals who reflected more on the CRT made more utilitarian judgments. A follow-up study suggested that trait reflectiveness is also associated with increased utilitarian judgment. In Experiment 2, subjects considered (...)
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  24.  20
    Divine Intuition: Cognitive Style Influences Belief in God.Amitai Shenhav, David G. Rand & Joshua D. Greene - 2012 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 141 (3):423.
  25. Why Are VMPFC Patients More Utilitarian? A Dual-Process Theory of Moral Judgment Explains.Joshua D. Greene - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (8):322-323.
  26.  46
    Hedonic and Non-Hedonic Bias Towards the Future.Preston Greene, Andrew James Latham, Kristie Miller & James Norton - manuscript
    It has widely been assumed, by philosophers, that our first-person preferences regarding pleasurable and painful experiences exhibit a bias toward the future (hedonic future bias), and that our preferences regarding non-hedonic events exhibit no such bias (non-hedonic time neutrality). Further, it has been assumed that our third-person preferences regarding both hedonic and non-hedonic events are time neutral. Some have attempted to use this (presumed) differential pattern of future bias—different across kinds of events, and different across first- vs third-person preferences—to argue (...)
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  27. Against Time Bias.Preston Greene & Meghan Sullivan - 2015 - Ethics 125 (4):947-970.
    Most of us display a bias toward the near: we prefer pleasurable experiences to be in our near future and painful experiences to be in our distant future. We also display a bias toward the future: we prefer pleasurable experiences to be in our future and painful experiences to be in our past. While philosophers have tended to think that near bias is a rational defect, almost no one finds future bias objectionable. In this essay, we argue that this hybrid (...)
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  28.  6
    Metacognition of Agency.Janet Metcalfe & Matthew Jason Greene - 2007 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 136 (2):184-199.
  29. Multi-System Moral Psychology.Fiery Cushman, Liane Young & Joshua D. Greene - 2010 - In John Michael Doris (ed.), The Moral Psychology Handbook. Oxford University Press.
  30. Value in Very Long Lives.Preston Greene - 2017 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 14 (4):416-434.
    As things currently stand, our deaths are unavoidable and our lifespans short. It might be thought that these qualities leave room for improvement. According to a prominent line of argument in philosophy, however, this thought is mistaken. Against the idea that a longer life would be better, it is claimed that negative psychological states, such as boredom, would be unavoidable if our lives were significantly longer. Against the idea that a deathless life would be better, it is claimed that such (...)
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  31. Moral Reasoning: Hints and Allegations.Joseph M. Paxton & Joshua D. Greene - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):511-527.
    Recent research in moral psychology highlights the role of emotion and intuition in moral judgment. In the wake of these findings, the role and significance of moral reasoning remain uncertain. In this article, we distinguish among different kinds of moral reasoning and review evidence suggesting that at least some kinds of moral reasoning play significant roles in moral judgment, including roles in abandoning moral intuitions in the absence of justifying reasons, applying both deontological and utilitarian moral principles, and counteracting automatic (...)
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  32.  50
    Success-First Decision Theories.Preston Greene - 2018 - In Arif Ahmed (ed.), Newcomb's Problem. Cambridge University Press. pp. 115–137.
    The standard formulation of Newcomb's problem compares evidential and causal conceptions of expected utility, with those maximizing evidential expected utility tending to end up far richer. Thus, in a world in which agents face Newcomb problems, the evidential decision theorist might ask the causal decision theorist: "if you're so smart, why ain’cha rich?” Ultimately, however, the expected riches of evidential decision theorists in Newcomb problems do not vindicate their theory, because their success does not generalize. Consider a theory that allows (...)
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  33.  24
    The Rat-a-Gorical Imperative: Moral Intuition and the Limits of Affective Learning.Joshua D. Greene - 2017 - Cognition 167:66-77.
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  34.  37
    Visual Search in Scenes Involves Selective and Nonselective Pathways.Jeremy M. Wolfe, Melissa L.-H. Võ, Karla K. Evans & Michelle R. Greene - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):77-84.
  35. The Dialectic of Freedom.Maxine Greene - 1988
     
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  36.  40
    Moral Issues of Human-Non-Human Primate Neural Grafting.Mark Greene, Kathryn Schill, Shoji Takahashi, Alison Bateman-House, Tom Beauchamp, Hilary Bok, Dorothy Cheney, Joseph Coyle, Terrence Deacon, Daniel Dennett, Peter Donovan, Owen Flanagan, Steven Goldman, Henry Greely, Lee Martin & Earl Miller - 2005 - Science 309 (5733):385-386.
    The scientific, ethical, and policy issues raised by research involving the engraftment of human neural stem cells into the brains of nonhuman primates are explored by an interdisciplinary working group in this Policy Forum. The authors consider the possibility that this research might alter the cognitive capacities of recipient great apes and monkeys, with potential significance for their moral status.
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  37. An Introduction to the Study of Experimental Medicine.Claude Bernard, Henry Copley Greene & Lawrence Joseph Henderson - 1927 - Classics of Medicine Library.
     
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  38.  19
    Ethical Issues of Using CRISPR Technologies for Research on Military Enhancement.Marsha Greene & Zubin Master - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):327-335.
    This paper presents an overview of the key ethical questions of performing gene editing research on military service members. The recent technological advance in gene editing capabilities provided by CRISPR/Cas9 and their path towards first-in-human trials has reinvigorated the debate on human enhancement for non-medical purposes. Human performance optimization has long been a priority of military research in order to close the gap between the advancement of warfare and the limitations of human actors. In spite of this focus on temporary (...)
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  39.  7
    Multiple Explanations for Multiply Quantified Sentences: Are Multiple Models Necessary?Steven B. Greene - 1992 - Psychological Review 99 (1):184-187.
  40.  14
    Sacrificial Utilitarian Judgments Do Reflect Concern for the Greater Good: Clarification Via Process Dissociation and the Judgments of Philosophers.Paul Conway, Jacob Goldstein-Greenwood, David Polacek & Joshua D. Greene - 2018 - Cognition 179:241-265.
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  41.  5
    Beyond Point-and-Shoot Morality: Why Cognitive Science Matters for Ethics.Joshua D. Greene - 2015 - The Law and Ethics of Human Rights 9 (2):141-172.
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  42.  20
    Beyond Point-and-Shoot Morality: Why Cognitive Science Matters for Ethics.Joshua D. Greene - 2015 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 9 (2):141-172.
    Journal Name: The Law & Ethics of Human Rights Issue: Ahead of print.
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  43.  44
    The Rise of Moral Cognition.Joshua D. Greene - 2015 - Cognition 135:39-42.
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  44. Emotion and Morality: A Tasting Menu.Joshua D. Greene - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (3):227-229.
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  45. Tolerating Hate in the Name of Democracy.Amanda Greene & Robert Mark Simpson - 2017 - Modern Law Review 80 (4):746-65.
    This article offers a comprehensive and critical analysis of Eric Heinze’s book Hate Speech and Democratic Citizenship (Oxford University Press, 2016). Heinze’s project is to formulate and defend a more theoretically complex version of the idea (also defended by people like Ronald Dworkin and James Weinstein) that general legal prohibitions on hate speech in public discourse compromises the state’s democratic legitimacy. We offer a detailed synopsis of Heinze’s view, highlighting some of its distinctive qualities and strengths. We then develop a (...)
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  46. Religion within the Limits of Reason alone.Immanuel Kant & Theodore M. Greene - 1936 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 43 (1):11-12.
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  47.  33
    The Termination Risks of Simulation Science.Preston Greene - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-21.
    Historically, the hypothesis that our world is a computer simulation has struck many as just another improbable-but-possible “skeptical hypothesis” about the nature of reality. Recently, however, the simulation hypothesis has received significant attention from philosophers, physicists, and the popular press. This is due to the discovery of an epistemic dependency: If we believe that our civilization will one day run many simulations concerning its ancestry, then we should believe that we are probably in an ancestor simulation right now. This essay (...)
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  48.  7
    Differential Information, Arbitrage, and Subjective Value.Catherine Greene - forthcoming - Topoi:1-9.
    de Bruin et al. The Stanford encyclopedia of philosophy, Stanford University, Stanford, 2018) write that it is a philosophically interesting question “whether there is such a thing as an “intrinsic” value of financial assets” noting that the calculation of any intrinsic price will depend, in part, on subjective elements. McCauley suggest that there are at least five different notions of the ‘true value’ of an asset in finance theory, and argues, consistent with de Bruin et al. that in many cases (...)
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  49. When Is A Belief True Because Of Luck?Preston Greene - 2013 - Philosophical Quarterly 63 (252):465-475.
    Many epistemologists are attracted to the claim that knowledge possession excludes luck. Virtue epistemologists attempt to clarify this idea by holding that knowledge requires apt belief: belief that is true because of an agent's epistemic virtues, and not because of luck. Thinking about aptness may have the potential to make progress on important questions in epistemology, but first we must possess an adequate account of when a belief is true because of luck. Existing treatments of aptness assume a simple and (...)
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  50.  33
    Approaching Socially Responsible Investment with a Comprehensive Ratings Scheme: Total Social Impact.Stephen Dillenburg, Timothy Greene & O. . Homer Erekson - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 43 (3):167-177.
    The socially responsible investment industry is slowly changing from a screening, avoidance paradigm to a comprehensive paradigm that seeks to affect corporate behavior. Credible rating systems are a key component of this sea change. Reliable and recognizable social and environmental metrics are critical to this progress. The Total Social Impact rating approach is a new social metric scheme based on a comprehensive rating of stakeholder issues. This paper describes the evolution of SRI ratings and the role that TSI hopes to (...)
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