Results for 'Teaching Philosophy'

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  1. Teaching Philosophy Today. Edited by Terrell Ward Bynum and Sidney Reisberg. --.Terrell Ward Bynum, Sidney Reisberg & National Information and Resource Center for the Teaching of Philosophy - 1977 - The National Information and Resource Center for the Teaching of Philosophy, by the Philosophy Documentation Center.
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  2. Polling as Pedagogy: Experimental Philosophy as a Valuable Tool for Teaching Philosophy.Thomas Nadelhoffer & Eddy Nahmias - 2008 - Teaching Philosophy 31 (1):39-58.
    First, we briefly familiarize the reader with the emerging field of “experimental philosophy,” in which philosophers use empirical methods, rather than armchair speculation, to ascertain laypersons’ intuitions about philosophical issues. Second, we discuss how the surveys used by experimental philosophers can serve as valuable pedagogical tools for teaching philosophy—independently of whether one believes surveying laypersons is an illuminating approach to doing philosophy. Giving students surveys that contain questions and thought experiments from philosophical debates gets them to (...)
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  3. Teaching Philosophy Through Lincoln-Douglas Debate.Jacob Nebel, Ryan W. Davis, Peter van Elswyk & Ben Holguin - 2013 - Teaching Philosophy 36 (3):271-289.
    This paper is about teaching philosophy to high school students through Lincoln-Douglas (LD) debate. LD, also known as “values debate,” includes topics from ethics and political philosophy. Thousands of high school students across the U.S. debate these topics in class, after school, and at weekend tournaments. We argue that LD is a particularly effective tool for teaching philosophy, but also that LD today falls short of its potential. We argue that the problems with LD are (...)
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    Teaching Philosophy Through a Role-Immersion Game.Kathryn E. Joyce, Andy Lamey & Noel Martin - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (2):175-198.
    A growing body of research suggests that students achieve learning outcomes at higher rates when instructors use active-learning methods rather than standard modes of instruction. To investigate how one such method might be used to teach philosophy, we observed two classes that employed Reacting to the Past, an educational role-immersion game. We chose to investigate Reacting because role-immersion games are considered a particularly effective active-learning strategy. Professors who have used Reacting to teach history, interdisciplinary humanities, and political theory agree (...)
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    The Importance of Humor in Teaching Philosophy.Al Gini - 2011 - Teaching Philosophy 34 (2):143-149.
    Philosophy and joke telling do not share the same pedigree, but both can have an allied function and purpose. Philosophy and joke telling can help us to organize, interpret, possibly understand, or, at least, hopefully face and confront the fundamental issues of existence.Let me be more precise about what I mean by using humor and jokes in teaching philosophy. Humor, joke telling, can serve as a narrative playlet to metaphorically illuminate a complex philosophical concept. However, every (...)
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    Are There Any Right or Wrong Answers in Teaching Philosophy?Gordon Tait, Clare O'Farrell, Sarah Davey Chesters, Joanne Brownlee & Rebecca Spooner-Lane - 2012 - Teaching Philosophy 35 (4):367-381.
    This article assesses undergraduate teaching students’ assertion that there are no right and wrong answers in teaching philosophy. When asked questions about their experiences of philosophy in the classroom for primary children, their unanimous declaration that teaching philosophy has ‘no right and wrong answers’ is critically examined across the three sub-disciplinary areas to which they were generally referring, namely, pedagogy, ethics, and epistemology. From a pedagogical point of view, it is argued that some teach­ing (...)
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    Teaching Philosophy as a Life Skill.Robert W. Bailor - 1998 - Teaching Philosophy 21 (2):119-130.
    This paper addresses the problem of the perceived irrelevance of philosophy to undergraduate students and advances a pedagogical strategy for making philosophy relevant. Teaching philosophy as the pursuit of life as meaningful, that is, as a life skill, frames philosophy as a relevant study of significant benefit to them. The overall goal of a course which approaches philosophy this way is to develop a “creative aptitude” in students. Thus, students do not learn philosophical lessons (...)
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    Teaching Philosophy by Teaching Philosophy Teaching.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2003 - Teaching Philosophy 26 (3):283-297.
    Standard approaches to teaching philosophy tend to focus on teaching aspects of philosophy that are important to doing professional philosophy. This paper suggests an alternative to this approach by preparing college students to teach philosophy to elementary school children. After arguing that classics in children’s literature ought to be the primary vehicle for initiating philosophical discussion in elementary school children, an upper-level seminar for undergraduates at Mount Holyoke College that takes this alternative approach is (...)
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    Teaching Philosophy of the City.Gerald J. Erion - 2018 - Teaching Philosophy 41 (2):137-150.
    This paper reviews goals, content materials, and other essential elements of a new, experimental philosophy course on the built environment of cities now being developed in Buffalo, New York. Applying traditional philosophical methods, the course adds experiential components and expands philosophy’s scope in ways that promote deep learning about the city. A model unit on the work of Frederick Law Olmsted receives special attention here, as Olmsted’s work in Buffalo and elsewhere invites philosophical treatment—analysis, critical examination, and so (...)
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    Teaching Philosophy to Chinese Students in Mainland China as a Foreign Professor.Paul J. D'Ambrosio - 2017 - Teaching Philosophy 40 (4):407-435.
    In recent years, universities throughout the People’s Republic of China have begun actively seeking foreign professors to work full-time in their philosophy departments. This, coupled with the decrease in the number of job openings in philosophy across western Europe and North America, might very well lead to a sharp rise in the number of foreign faculty members in philosophy departments across mainland China. In this article I will outline three of the major difficulties facing philosophy teachers (...)
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    A Writing Approach to Teaching Philosophy.Anne M. Edwards - 1996 - Teaching Philosophy 19 (2):111-119.
    This paper outlines a strategy for teaching an Introduction to Philosophy anthology. The author argues that students in introductory philosophy courses are unable to comprehend primary sources in philosophy anthologies because of the distance and foreignness of the text. A course relying on lectures as the primary mode of engagement with texts results in mere exposition and does not facilitate a critical engagement with primary texts for students. The author suggests that teachers in introductory courses should (...)
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    How Important Is Student Participation in Teaching Philosophy?Brook J. Sadler - 2004 - Teaching Philosophy 27 (3):251-267.
    Student participation is essential to philosophy since dialogue is at the center of philosophical activity: it provides students an opportunity to articulate their philosophical ideas, it helps them connect philosophy to their practical experience, it serves as an opportunity for instructors to take an interest in their students’ views, and it promotes intellectual virtues like courage and honesty. However, lectures can serve many of the same functions, albeit in different ways, e.g. a lecturer can engage other historical philosophers (...)
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    Teaching Philosophy in Second Life.Chris Calvert-Minor - 2011 - Teaching Philosophy 34 (1):1-16.
    Second Life is a free, three-dimensional, multi-user, online virtual world program created in 2003 by Linden Research Inc. In this paper, I recount the Introduction to Philosophy course I taught in Second Life for the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater and address five areas of interest: (1) traditional vs. non-traditional learning environments, (2) communication, (3) illustrative props, (4) student feedback, and (5) and potential concerns. My conclusion is that philosophy courses can be taught online in Second Life effectively and that (...)
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    Teaching Philosophy Outside of the Classroom: One Alternative to Service Learning.Sarah K. Donovan - 2008 - Teaching Philosophy 31 (2):161-177.
    In this article I describe my experience teaching a moral problems course to first-year students within a Learning Community model. I begin with the learning goals and the mechanics of both my Learning Community and my moral problems course. I then focus on the experiential learning requirement of my Learning Community which is based on a field trip model instead of a service learning model. I describe how two field trips in particular—one to an Arab American community in Brooklyn, (...)
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    A Cognitive Approach to Teaching Philosophy.Emily Esch - 2013 - Teaching Philosophy 36 (2):107-124.
    Our knowledge of how the mind works is growing rapidly. One area of particular interest to philosophy teachers is research on reasoning and decision making processes. I explore one model of human cognition that offers new ways of thinking about how to teach philosophical skills. The bulk of the paper is dedicated to exposition of the model and the evidence that supports it; at the end of the paper, I suggest ways these findings might be incorporated into the classroom.
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    An Experiential Component in Teaching Philosophy of Science.Moti Nissani - 1995 - Teaching Philosophy 18 (2):147-154.
    The author presents an updated version of J.B. Conant's vision of the inclusion of hands-on experiences and self-contained historical case studies in introductory philosophy of science course. The experiential component is often neglected in philosophy of science courses. Students are usually given scientific facts, concepts, and practices as their formal introduction to the material, which prohibits them from engaging with the question of the nature of science in general. Student finish courses without adequate experience of the concepts or (...)
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    Teaching Philosophy in Britain's Open University (II).Godfrey Vesey - 1975 - Teaching Philosophy 1 (2):125-133.
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    Teaching Philosophy on Television.Joan B. Fiscella - 1983 - Teaching Philosophy 6 (2):223-228.
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    What is 'Teaching Philosophy'?John Wilson - 1982 - Teaching Philosophy 5 (3):193-201.
  20.  24
    Teaching Teaching Philosophy.Michael Martin - 1975 - Teaching Philosophy 1 (2):141-146.
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    Teaching Philosophy of Biology.Lindley Darden - 1977 - Teaching Philosophy 2 (2):153-161.
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    An Historicist View of Teaching Philosophy.Lisa Portmess - 1984 - Teaching Philosophy 7 (4):313-323.
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    Teaching Philosophy in Africa.M. Akin Makinde - 1987 - Teaching Philosophy 10 (3):227-238.
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    Teaching Philosophy, Being a Philosopher.Joel Marks - 1993 - Teaching Philosophy 16 (2):99-104.
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    Case Study in the Ethics of Teaching Philosophy.Gregory Pence - 1995 - Teaching Philosophy 18 (2):165-166.
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    Teaching Philosophy.Ron Rembert - 1984 - Teaching Philosophy 7 (1):43-47.
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    The Learning-Cell Technique for Teaching Philosophy.Monika Langer - 1985 - Teaching Philosophy 8 (1):41-46.
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    First Steps in Teaching Philosophy.John Wilson - 1975 - Teaching Philosophy 1 (2):224-227.
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    Moral Commitment and Teaching Philosophy.Diane Raymond - 1982 - Teaching Philosophy 5 (2):97-108.
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    Teaching Philosophy and Teaching Values.David T. Ozar - 1977 - Teaching Philosophy 2 (3/4):237-245.
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    Teaching Philosophy as an Exercise in Popular Culture.Jane Duran - 1983 - Teaching Philosophy 6 (2):103-107.
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    IV. Teaching Philosophy of Science at a State University.David L. Hull - 1977 - Teaching Philosophy 2 (2):119-121.
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    Teaching Philosophy in Britain's Open University (I).Godfrey Vesey - 1975 - Teaching Philosophy 1 (1):21-28.
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    Teaching Philosophy World-Wide.David Evans - 1992 - Teaching Philosophy 15 (3):301-304.
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    Teaching Philosophy to High School Students.Stephen Hicks & Monica Holland - 1989 - Teaching Philosophy 12 (2):115-130.
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    Are You Teaching Philosophy, or Playing the Dozens?Susan R. Peterson - 1980 - Teaching Philosophy 3 (4):435-442.
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    Teaching Philosophy in the Appalachians.Frans Van Der Bogert - 1977 - Teaching Philosophy 2 (3/4):281-289.
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    Teaching Philosophy.Michael Goldman - 2005 - Teaching Philosophy 28 (3):277-279.
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    VI. Teaching Philosophy of Science in an Interdisciplinary Context.Robert J. Baum - 1977 - Teaching Philosophy 2 (2):126-130.
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    Teaching Philosophy in Africa.Chukwudum B. Okolo - 1987 - Teaching Philosophy 10 (3):239-247.
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    “They Read Novels, Don’T They?”: Using Novels in Teaching Philosophy.Larry S. Bowlden - 1990 - Teaching Philosophy 13 (4):359-364.
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    Practical Suggestions for Teaching Small Philosophy Classes.Eddy Nahmias - 2005 - Teaching Philosophy 28 (1):59-65.
    This paper offers a number of tips for teaching small philosophy classes (under twenty-five students). Some of these include using a horseshoe seating arrangement, replacing hand-raising with name cards, engaging in “real” Socratic dialogues, having students create a philosophical “Question of the Day”, and assigning students “Critical Response” papers.
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    Changing Values in Teaching and Learning Philosophy.Sarah Cashmore - 2015 - Teaching Philosophy 38 (2):145-167.
    This paper examines the pedagogical values inherent in various traditions of philosophy education, from the ancient Greeks to current practices in Ontario high schools, and asks whether our current educational practices are imparting the philosophical values we wish to bestow upon our learners. I compare the approaches of Socrates, Descartes, and Dewey on the nature of philosophy and the pedagogical frameworks they defend for transmitting the “spirit” of philosophy, and then examine the Ontario curriculum guidelines for the (...)
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    Teaching Daoism as Philosophy.Alan Fox - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (1):1-28.
    I propose to consider chapter 1 of the famous, classic, and foundational Daoist text Dao De Jing, attributed to Laozi, in order to enable a non-expert to negotiate the subject of Daoism in a global philosophy context, and to further enhance the teaching of philosophy by introducing and emphasizing at least some of the controversies that inevitably surround interpretation of a classical set of texts and ideas. This forces students to see through simplistic dichotomies and form subtler (...)
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    Teaching Writing-Intensive Undergraduate Philosophy Courses.Rodney C. Roberts - 2002 - Teaching Philosophy 25 (3):195-211.
    A number of colleges and universities offer writing intensive courses that emphasize writing as a primary means of learning. This paper presents an approach to teaching undergraduate philosophy courses that makes an effective use of writing as a means to teach students philosophy. The paper begins by discussing the aims and requirements of writing intensive philosophy courses and the nature of philosophical writing. In addition, five course activities are discussed along with a summary of the work (...)
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  46. Teaching Recent Continental Philosophy.Stephen H. Daniel - 2004 - In Tziporah Kasachkoff (ed.), Teaching Philosophy: Theoretical Reflections and Practical Suggestions. pp. 197-206.
    An explanation of how to organize and teach a course in recent continental thought, including treatments of the major figures in critical theory, hermeneutics, structuralism, deconstruction, psychoanalytic feminism, poststructuralism, postcolonialism, and postmodernism. Reprint from *In the Socratic Tradition: Essays on Teaching Philosophy*, ed. Tziporah Kasachkoff (Lanham, Md: Rowman and Littlefield, 1998).
     
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  47. Araucaria as a Tool for Diagramming Arguments in Teaching and Studying Philosophy .F. Macagno, D. Walton, G. Rowe & C. Reed - 2006 - Teaching Philosophy 29 (2):111-124,.
    This paper explains how to use a new software tool for argument diagramming available free on the Internet, showing especially how it can be used in the classroom to enhance critical thinking in philosophy. The user loads a text file containing an argument into a box on the computer interface, and then creates an argument diagram by dragging lines from one node to another. A key feature is the support for argumentation schemes, common patterns of defeasible reasoning historically know (...)
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    History and Philosophy of Science and the Teaching of Evolution: Students’ Conceptions and Explanations.Kostas Kampourakis & Ross H. Nehm - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 377-399.
    A large body of work in science education indicates that evolution is one of the least understood and accepted scientific theories. Although scholarship from the history and philosophy of science (HPS) has shed light on many conceptual and pedagogical issues in evolution education, HPS-informed studies of evolution education are also characterized by conceptual weaknesses. In this chapter, we critically review such studies and find that some work lacks historically accurate characterizations of student ideas (preconceptions and misconceptions). In addition, although (...)
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    Philosophy Children and Teaching Philosophy.Richard E. Hart - 1989 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 8 (3):25-26.
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    Teaching Philosophy 101.Randy Ramal - 2004 - Teaching Ethics 4 (2):109-115.
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