Search results for 'Technology Social aspects' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Joseph Agassi (1985). Technology, Philosophical and Social Aspects. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  2.  6
    Donald MacKenzie (1986). Why "the Social Aspects of Science and Technology" is Not Just an Optional Extra. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 15 (4):2-6.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. I. T. Frolov (1988). On the Perspectives of Research Into the Philosophical and Social Aspects of Science and Technology. Dialectics and Humanism 15 (3-4).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  9
    Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5.  4
    Steven M. Flipse, Maarten Ca van der Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Graeme Kirkpatrick (2008). Technology and Social Power. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This text provides an overview of debates in the sociology of technology, including definitions of the main terms and concepts and discussion of the dominant positions, especially in recent scholarship. At the same time, it develops a novel perspective on the subject based in critical theory, bridging work in the sociology of science and technology with wider debate in social theory. It integrates empirical and theoretical elements in well-themed chapters and draws on interesting contemporary examples such as (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  7. Wolfgang Krohn, Edwin T. Layton & Peter Weingart (eds.) (1978). The Dynamics of Science and Technology: Social Values, Technical Norms, and Scientific Criteria in the Development of Knowledge. D. Reidel Pub. Co..
  8. Steven Yearley (1988). Science, Technology, and Social Change. Unwin Hyman.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  9. Marcia-Anne Dobres (2000). Technology and Social Agency: Outlining a Practice Framework for Archaeology. Blackwell Publishers.
  10. Michael Lynch (ed.) (2012). Science and Technology Studies: Critical Concepts in the Social Sciences. Routledge.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Carl Mitcham (ed.) (1995). Social and Philosophical Constructions of Technology. Jai Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Anabela Sarmento (ed.) (2011). Sociological and Philosophical Aspects of Human Interaction with Technology: Advancing Concepts. Information Science Reference.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  24
    Martin Bridgstock (ed.) (1998). Science, Technology, and Society: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the human, social and economic aspects of science and technology. It examines a broad range of issues from a variety of perspectives, using examples and experiences from Australia and around the world. The authors present complex issues in an accessible and engaging form. Topics include the responsibilities of scientists, ethical dilemmas and controversies, the Industrial Revolution, economic issues, public policy, and science and technology in developing countries. The book ends (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14.  85
    Francois Berger, Sjef Gevers, Ludwig Siep & Klaus-Michael Weltring (2008). Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects of Brain-Implants Using Nano-Scale Materials and Techniques. NanoEthics 2 (3):241-249.
    Nanotechnology is an important platform technology which will add new features like improved biocompatibility, smaller size, and more sophisticated electronics to neuro-implants improving their therapeutic potential. Especially in view of possible advantages for patients, research and development of nanotechnologically improved neuro implants is a moral obligation. However, the development of brain implants by itself touches many ethical, social and legal issues, which also apply in a specific way to devices enabled or improved by nanotechnology. For researchers developing nanotechnology (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  15.  92
    Andrew Feenberg (2002). Transforming Technology: A Critical Theory Revisited. Oxford University Press.
    Thoroughly revised, this new edition of Critical Theory of Technology rethinks the relationships between technology, rationality, and democracy, arguing that the degradation of labor--as well as of many environmental, educational, and political systems--is rooted in the social values that preside over technological development. It contains materials on political theory, but the emphasis has shifted to reflect a growing interest in the fields of technology and cultural studies.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   36 citations  
  16.  9
    Sacchini Dario, Virdis Andrea, Refolo Pietro, Pennacchini Maddalena & de Paula Ignacio Carrasco (2009). Health Technology Assessment (HTA): Ethical Aspects. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):453-457.
    “HTA is a multidisciplinary process that summarizes information about the medical, social, economic and ethical issues related to the use of a health technology in a systematic, transparent, unbiased, robust manner. Its aim is to inform the formulation of safe, effective, health policies that are patient focused, and seek to achieve best value” (EUnetHTA 2007). Even though the assessment of ethical aspects of a health technology is listed as one of the objectives of a HTA process, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  39
    Michael Gibbons (ed.) (1994). The New Production of Knowledge: The Dynamics of Science and Research in Contemporary Societies. Sage Publications.
    As we approach the end of the twentieth century, the ways in which knowledge--scientific, social, and cultural--is produced are undergoing fundamental changes. In The New Production of Knowledge, a distinguished group of authors analyze these changes as marking the transition from established institutions, disciplines, practices, and policies to a new mode of knowledge production. Identifying such elements as reflexivity, transdisciplinarity, and heterogeneity within this new mode, the authors consider their impact and interplay with the role of knowledge in (...) relations. While the knowledge produced by research and development in science and technology is accorded central focus, the authors also outline the changing dimensions of social scientific and humanities knowledge and the relations between the production of knowledge and its dissemination through education. Placing science policy and scientific knowledge within the broader context of contemporary society, this book will be essential reading for all those concerned with the changing nature of knowledge, with the social study of science, with educational systems, and with the correlation between research and development and social, economic, and technological development. "Thought-provoking in its identification of issues that are global in scope; for policy makers in higher education, government, or the commercial sector." --Choice "By their insightful identification of the recent social transformation of knowledge production, the authors have been able to assert new imperatives for policy institutions. The lessons of the book are deep." --Alexis Jacquemin, Universite Catholique de Louvain and Advisor, Foreign Studies Unit, European Commission "Should we celebrate the emergence of a 'post-academic' mode of postmodern knowledge production of the post-industrial society of the 21st Century? Or should we turn away from it with increasing fear and loathing as we also uncover its contradictions. A generation of enthusiasts and/or critics will be indebted to the team of authors for exposing so forcefully the intimate connections between all the cognitive, educational, organizational, and commercial changes that are together revolutionizing the sciences, the technologies, and the humanities. This book will surely spark off a vigorous and fruitful debate about the meaning and purpose of knowledge in our culture." --Professor John Ziman, (Wendy, Janey at Ltd. is going to provide affiliation. Contact if you don't hear from her.) "Jointly authored by a team of distinguished scholars spanning a number of disciplines, The New Production of Knowledge maps the changes in the mode of knowledge production and the global impact of such transformations. . . . The authors succeed . . . at sketching out, in very large strokes, the emerging trends in knowledge production and their implications for future society. The macro focus of the book is a welcome change from the micro obsession of most sociologists of science, who have pretty much deconstructed institutions and even scientific knowledge out of existence." --Contemporary Sociology "This book is a timely contribution to current discussion on the breakdown of and need to renegotiate the social contract between science and society that Vannevar Bush and likeminded architects of science policy constructed immediately after World War II. It goes far beyond the usual scattering of fragmentary insights into changing institutional landscapes, cognitive structures, or quality control mechanisms of present day science, and their linkages with society at large. Tapping a wide variety of sources, the authors provide a coherent picture of important new characteristics that, taken altogether, fundamentally challenge our traditional notions of what academic research is all about. This well-founded analysis of the social redistribution of knowledge and its associated power patterns helps articulate what otherwise tends to remain an--albeit widespread--intuition. Unless they adapt to the new situation, universities in the future will find the centers of gravity of knowledge production moving even further beyond their ken. Knowledge of the social and cognitive dynamics of science in research is much needed as a basis of science and technology policymaking. The New Production of Knowledge does a lot to fill this gap. Another unique feature is its discussion of the humanities, which are usually left out in works coming out of the social studies of science." --Aant Elzinga, University od Goteborg. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   150 citations  
  18. Sergio Sismondo (2004). An Introduction to Science and Technology Studies. Blackwell Pub..
    The prehistory of science and technology studies -- The Kuhnian revolution -- Questioning functionalism in the sociology of science -- Stratification and discrimination -- The strong programme and the sociology of knowledge -- The social construction of scientific and technical realities -- Feminist epistemologies of science -- Actor-network theory -- Two questions concerning technology -- Studying laboratories -- Controversies -- Standardization and objectivity -- Rhetoric and discourse -- The unnaturalness of science and technology -- The public (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  19.  28
    David Bell (2006). Science, Technology and Culture. Open University Press.
    Equipping readers with an understanding of science and technology as aspects of culture, the book encourages them to think about the roles and effects of ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  15
    Sarah Kuhn (1998). When Worlds Collide: Engineering Students Encounter Social Aspects of Production. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (4):457-472.
    To design effective and socially sensitive systems, engineers must be able to integrate a technology-based approach to engineering problems with concerns for social impact and the context of use. The conventional approach to engineering education is largely technology-based, and even when additional courses with a social orientation are added, engineering graduates are often not well prepared to design user- and context-sensitive systems. Using data from interviews with three engineering students who had significant exposure to a socially-oriented (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  21.  74
    Bruno Latour (1987). Science in Action: How to Follow Scientists and Engineers Through Society. Harvard University Press.
    In this book Bruno Latour brings together these different approaches to provide a lively and challenging analysis of science, demonstrating how social context..
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   493 citations  
  22. Rayvon Fouché (ed.) (2007). Technology Studies. Sage Publications.
    Technology, in its current usage, can most simply be understood to have three components: artifacts, practices, and knowledge. Artifacts are the material objects that exist in the world. Practices are the methods and techniques used to interact with artifacts and knowledge represents the underlying theoretical and conceptual paradigms that influence technology in different cultural contexts. Using these components as the framework, this four volume major work traces the intellectual, scholarly, and public evolution of technology studies and ultimately (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  66
    Daniel Lee Kleinman (2005). Science and Technology in Society: From Biotechnology to the Internet. Blackwell Pub..
    This thoughtful and engaging text challenges the widely held notion of science as somehow outside of society, and the idea that technology proceeds automatically down a singular and inevitable path. Through specific case studies involving contemporary debates, this book shows that science and technology are fundamentally part of society and are shaped by it. Draws on concepts from political sociology, organizational analysis, and contemporary social theory. Avoids dense theoretical debate. Includes case studies and concluding chapter summaries for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  5
    S. Strijbos & Andrew Basden (eds.) (2006). In Search of an Integrative Vision for Technology: Interdisciplinary Studies in Information Systems. Springer.
    In Search Of An Integrative Vision For Technology will stimulate its readers to consider the 'whole story that is information systems' within the context of an integrative vision of technology. It integrates disparate areas of debate and research while appreciating the contribution that philosophy can make to such thinking. It is deliberately broad in coverage, and designed to provide useful pointers so that researchers, students, practitioners, and developers can easily apply each point as needed. "Human issues of (...) and their normative aspects" is a theme that runs throughout the entire book. The integrative vision is centered on an understanding of human practice — the twin notions of structure and direction, and the leading and the founding functions of such practice. While this understanding applies to all technologies, it is worked out in more detail for information technology. From this philosophical understanding, many interdisciplinary areas of interest are identified. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  8
    Yanna Vogiazou (2007). Design for Emergence: Collaborative Social Play with Online and Location-Based Media. Ios Press.
    In light of the fact that social dynamics and unexpected uses of technology can inspire innovation, this book proposes a research model of design for emergence, ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  26
    Bruno Latour (1993). We Have Never Been Modern. Harvard University Press.
    A summation of the work of one of the most influential and provocative interpreters of science, it aims at saving what is good and valuable in modernity and ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   211 citations  
  27.  49
    W. Brian Arthur (2009). The Nature of Technology: What It is and How It Evolves. Free Press.
    "More than any thing else technology creates our world. It creates our wealth, our economy, our very way of being," says W. Brian Arthur. Yet, until now the major questions of technology have gone unanswered. Where do new technologies come from -- how exactly does invention work? What constitutes innovation, and how is it achieved? Why are certain regions -- Cambridge, England, in the 1920s and Silicon Valley today -- hotbeds of innovation, while others languish? Does technology, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  28.  13
    Zhouying Jin (2011). Global Technological Change: From Hard Technology to Soft Technology. Intellect.
    This updated second edition of Global Technological Change reconsiders how we make and use technology in the twenty-first century.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29. Edward Tenner (2003). Our Own Devices: The Past and Future of Body Technology. Alfred A. Knopf.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface ix -- Chapter One: Technology, Technique, and the Body 3 --Chapter Two: The First Technology: Bottle-Feeding 30 --Chapter Three: Slow Motion: Zori 51 --Chapter Four: Double Time: Athletic Shoes 75 --Chapter Five: Sitting Up Straight: Posture Chairs 104 --Chapter Six: Laid Back: Reclining Chairs 134 --Chapter Seven: Mechanical Arts: Musical Keyboards 161 --Chapter Eight: Letter Perfect?: Text Keyboards 187 --Chapter Nine: Second Sight: Eyeglasses 213 --Chapter Ten: Hardheaded Logic: Helmets 238 --Epilogue: Thumbs Up (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  30.  50
    Eric Higgs, Andrew Light & David Strong (eds.) (2000). Technology and the Good Life? University of Chicago Press.
    Can we use technology in the pursuit of a good life, or are we doomed to having our lives organized and our priorities set by the demands of machines and systems? How can philosophy help us to make technology a servant rather than a master? Technology and the Good Life? uses a careful collective analysis of Albert Borgmann's controversial and influential ideas as a jumping-off point from which to address questions such as these about the role and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  31.  70
    Wenda K. Bauchspies (2006). Science, Technology, and Society: A Sociological Approach. Blackwell Pub..
    Science, Technology and Society: A Sociological Approach is a comprehensive guide to the emergent field of science, technology, and society (STS) studies and its implications for today’s culture and society. Discusses current STS topics, research tools, and theories Tackles some of the most urgent issues in current STS studies, including power and culture, race, gender, colonialism, the Internet, cyborgs and robots, and biotechnology Includes case studies, a glossary, and further reading lists.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32.  13
    Evans E. Woherem (1991). Human Factors in Information Technology: The Socio-Organisational Aspects of Expert Systems Design. [REVIEW] AI and Society 5 (1):18-33.
    This paper looks beyond the mostly technical and business issues that currently inform the design of knowledge-based systems (e.g., expert systems) to point out that there is also a social and organisational (a socio-organisational) dimension to the issues affecting the design decisions of expert systems and other information technologies. It argues that whilst technical and business issues are considered before the design of Expert Systems, that socio-organisational issues determine the acceptance and long-run utility of the technology after it (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33.  14
    Eliezer Geisler (2000). The Metrics of Science and Technology. Quorum Books.
    This work copiles key metrics to measure and evalute the impact of science and technology on academia, industry and government. it covers such topics as ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34.  11
    Charles Cooper (ed.) (1972). Science, Technology and Development. London,F. Cass.
    Science, Technology and Production in the Underdeveloped Countries: An Introduction By Charles Cooper* The uncritical notion that it would be easy to orient ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  16
    Peter D. Hershock, M. T. Stepani͡ant͡s & Roger T. Ames (eds.) (2003). Technology and Cultural Values: On the Edge of the Third Millennium. East-West Philosophers Conference.
    The essays gathered here give voice to perspectives on the always improvised relationship between technology and cultural values from Africa, the Americas, Asia ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  29
    Jennifer Daryl Slack (2005). Culture + Technology: A Primer. Peter Lang.
    This book is a must read for anyone who cares about the place of technology in our lives.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  4
    Arnoldo K. Ventura (2003). A Natural Scientist and a Social Scientist Explore the Dilemma of Science. Ian Randle Publishers.
    SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY AND THE REDUCTION OF POVERTY If you treat an individual as he is, he will stay that way, but if you treat him as if he were what he ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  29
    David J. Gunkel (2007). Thinking Otherwise: Ethics, Technology and Other Subjects. Ethics and Information Technology 9 (3):165-177.
    Ethics is ordinarily understood as being concerned with questions of responsibility for and in the face of an other. This other is more often than not conceived of as another human being and, as such, necessarily excludes others – most notably animals and machines. This essay examines the ethics of such exclusivity. It is divided into three parts. The first part investigates the exclusive anthropocentrism of traditional forms of moral␣thinking and, following the example of recent innovations in animal rights philosophy, (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39. Hilde Corneliussen (2011). Gender-Technology Relations: Exploring Stability and Change. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Acknowledgements -- Disrupting the Impression of Stability in the Gender-Technology Relation -- Changing Images of Computers and its Users since 1980 -- Discursive Developments Within Computer Education -- Variations in Gender-ICT Relations Among Male and Female Computer Students -- Stories About Individual Change and Transformation -- Layered Meanings and Differences Within -- Is there an Elsewhere? -- References -- Endnotes -- Index.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Ralf Dahrendorf (ed.) (1977). Scientific-Technological Revolution: Social Aspects. Sage Publications [for] the International Sociological Association.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Larry A. Hickman & Elizabeth F. Porter (eds.) (1993). Technology and Ecology: The Proceedings of the Vii International Conference of the Society for Philosophy and Technology. The Society.
  42. Andrew Webster (1991). Science, Technology, and Society: New Directions. Macmillan.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  43. K. Guild Nichols (1979). Technology on Trial: Public Participation in Decision-Making Related to Science and Technology. Sold by Oecd Publications and Information Center].
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44. D. A. Ampofo (1994). The Health Issues of Human Reprodution [Sic] of Our Time: Philosophical Perspectives of Health and Social Problems of Procreation. Ghana Academy of Arts and Sciences.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Michael Breen, Eamonn Conway & Barry McMillan (eds.) (2003). Technology and Transcendence. Columba Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. E. H. S. Burhop (1975). The Social Future of Science. Birkbeck College.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. B. C. Chattopadhyay (ed.) (1992). Science and Technology for Rural Development. S. Chand & Co..
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Robin Clarke (1985). Science and Technology in World Development. Oxford University/Unesco.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Robert Daglish (ed.) (1972). The Scientific and Technological Revolution: Social Effects and Prospects. Moscow,Progress Publishers.
  50. Stevan Dedijer, Jan Annerstedt & Andrew Jamison (eds.) (1988). From Research Policy to Social Intelligence: Essays for Stevan Dedijer. Macmillan Press.
1 — 50 / 1000