7 found
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  1. Normative reconstruction and social memory: Honneth and Ricoeur.Terence Holden - 2020 - Continental Philosophy Review 53 (2):157-181.
    Normative reconstruction is a form of immanent critique which judges society in terms of values which are already institutionalized and implicitly expressed across everyday forms of interaction. Honneth, for his part, reads the value of social freedom into the normative grammar of modern institutions and anticipates further advances towards its institutionalization. Many have voiced doubts over the extent to which the model of normative reconstruction which Honneth proposes is solidly anchored in social reality: at worst, it is argued, this reality (...)
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  2. Honneth, Kojeve and Levinas on Intersubjectivity and History.Terence Holden - 2016 - Continental Philosophy Review 49 (3):349-369.
    I explore some of the challenges involved in establishing the intersubjective dynamic as the foundation for a normatively charged philosophy of history. I seek in addition to highlight the value of Levinas’ work for the field of recognition studies. Levinas in effect offers a transitional model of recognition between Kojeve and Honneth, and as such his work harbors the potential for addressing some of the difficulties which beset the work of both when it comes to formulating an understanding of recognition (...)
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  3. Adorno and Arendt: Evil, Modernity and the Underside of Theodicy.Terence Holden - 2019 - Sophia 58 (2):197-224.
    The point of departure for this article is a comparative study of Adorno and Arendt on the question of evil and modernity. To be precise, I observe how Adorno and Arendt present us with very different ways of understanding radical evil as an expression of the modern project of acceleration. This divergence presents us with a problematic which does not fit easily into the framework of the contemporary post-metaphysical engagement with evil. The latter projects a relational, non-substantive concept of evil (...)
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    Levinas Between Recognition and Heterology.Terence Holden - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):17-33.
    ABSTRACTI extract a problematic from Levinas’ shifting attitude towards the idea of recognition. An underappreciated aspect of Levinas’ work is that at an early stage he appeals to a recognition-based model of intersubjectivity, which characteristically plots a relation of mutual affirmation between individuals. However, he later explicitly rejects this paradigm in favour of an intensified heterological orientation which invests in otherness as a value in itself. Levinas’ rejection of recognition raises the question of how we are to interpret the relation (...)
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  5. Levinas, Recognition and Judaism.Terence Holden - 2017 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 82 (2):195-217.
    I seek to draw out the unique character of Levinas’ theory of recognition by highlighting its transitional character in a double sense. It is transitional, firstly, in that it stands between two models of recognition: the earlier agonistic model of Kojeve and the later model of Honneth which takes as its point of departure a primordial relation of mutual affirmation between individuals. It is transitional secondly in the sense that, while Levinas initially employs the concept of recognition, he is later (...)
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  6.  33
    Hartog, Koselleck, and Ricoeur: Historical Anthropology and the Crisis of the Present.Terence Holden - 2019 - History and Theory 58 (3):385-405.
  7.  34
    Levinas, Messianism and Parody.Terence Holden - 2011 - Continuum.
    There is no greater testament to Emmanuel Levinas' reputation as an enigmatic thinker than in his meditations on eschatology and its relevance for contemporary thought. Levinas has come to be seen as a principal representative in Continental philosophy - alongside the likes of Heidegger, Benjamin, Adorno and Zizek - of a certain philosophical messianism, differing from its religious counterpart in being formulated apparently without appeal to any dogmatic content. To date, however, Levinas' messianism has not received the same detailed attention (...)
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