Results for 'Terrence Guay'

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  1. Non-Governmental Organizations, Shareholder Activism, and Socially Responsible Investments: Ethical, Strategic, and Governance Implications. [REVIEW]Terrence Guay, Jonathan P. Doh & Graham Sinclair - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 52 (1):125-139.
    In this article, we document the growing influence of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the realm of socially responsible investing (SRI). Drawing from ethical and economic perspectives on stakeholder management and agency theory, we develop a framework to understand how and when NGOs will be most influential in shaping the ethical and social responsibility orientations of business using the emergence of SRI as the primary influencing vehicle. We find that NGOs have opportunities to influence corporate conduct via direct, indirect, and interactive (...)
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  2. The Influence of NGOs on International Labor and Environmental Agreements and Codes of Conduct.Terrence Guay & Jonathan P. Doh - 2002 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 13:381-390.
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  3.  34
    Evaluating the Impact of NGO Activism of Corporate Social Responsibility: Cases From Europe and the United States.Jonathan P. Doh & Terrence R. Guay - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:126-131.
    We argue that differences in the institutional setting of Europe and the US is the critical factor in understanding policymaking in Europe and the United States, and particularly the influence of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). To test this relationship between institutional differences, corporate social responsibility (CSR), and NGO activism, we investigate 12 cases involving US and European companies in each of three industries. We conclude that different institutional structures and political legacies in the US and Europe are important factors in explaining (...)
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  4.  11
    The Emergence of Probability. [REVIEW]Terrence L. Fine - 1978 - Philosophical Review 87 (1):116.
  5.  28
    Individuals Across The Sciences.Thomas Pradeu & Alexandre Guay (eds.) - 2016 - New York, État de New York, États-Unis: Oxford University Press.
    What are individuals? How can they be identified? These are crucial questions for philosophers and scientists alike. Criteria of individuality seem to differ markedly between metaphysics and the empirical sciences - and this might well explain why no work has hitherto attempted to relate the contributions of metaphysics, physics and biology on this question. This timely volume brings together various strands of research into 'individuality', examining how different sciences handle the issue, and reflecting on how this scientific work relates to (...)
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  6.  73
    Integrating Business Ethics Into an Undergraduate Curriculum.Terrence R. Bishop - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (4):291 - 299.
    The paper describes the approach by which ethics are integrated into the undergraduate curriculum at Northern Illinois University''s College of Business. Literature is reviewed to identify conceptual frameworks for, and issues associated with, the teaching of business ethics. From the review, a set of guidelines for teaching ethics is developed and proposed. The objectives and strategies implemented for teaching ethics is discussed. Foundation and follow-up coursework, measurement issues and ancillary programs are also discussed.
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  7. Evaluating the Pasadena, Altadena, and St Petersburg Gambles.Terrence L. Fine - 2008 - Mind 117 (467):613-632.
    By recourse to the fundamentals of preference orderings and their numerical representations through linear utility, we address certain questions raised in Nover and Hájek 2004, Hájek and Nover 2006, and Colyvan 2006. In brief, the Pasadena and Altadena games are well-defined and can be assigned any finite utility values while remaining consistent with preferences between those games having well-defined finite expected value. This is also true for the St Petersburg game. Furthermore, the dominance claimed for the Altadena game over the (...)
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  8.  83
    Theses on Biosemiotics: Prolegomena to a Theoretical Biology.Kalevi Kull, Terrence Deacon, Claus Emmeche, Jesper Hoffmeyer & Frederik Stjernfelt - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (2):167-173.
    Theses on the semiotic study of life as presented here provide a collectively formulated set of statements on what biology needs to be focused on in order to describe life as a process based on semiosis, or sign action. An aim of the biosemiotic approach is to explain how life evolves through all varieties of forms of communication and signification (including cellular adaptive behavior, animal communication, and human intellect) and to provide tools for grounding sign theories. We introduce the concept (...)
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  9.  20
    Terrence Malick and the Thought of Film.Steven Rybin - 2011 - Lexington Books.
    Terrence Malick and the Thought of Film explores how the experience of viewing Terrence Malick's films enables imaginative acts of philosophical interpretation. Useful for both professional philosophers interested in film and scholars of cinema intrigued by philosophy, this book shows the ways Malick's films cast philosophy in new cinematic light.
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  10.  39
    Why is the Transference Theory of Causation Insuffcient? The Challenge of the Aharonov-Bohm Effect.Vincent Ardourel & Alexandre Guay - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 63:12-23.
    The transference theory reduces causation to the transmission of physical conserved quantities, like energy or momenta. Although this theory aims at applying to all felds of physics, we claim that it fails to account for a quantum electrodynamic effect, viz. the Aharonov-Bohm effect. After having argued that the Aharonov-Bohm effect is a genuine counter-example for the transference theory, we offer a new physicalist approach of causation, ontic and modal, in which this effect is embedded.
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  11.  66
    “Saying What We Mean: An Argument Against Expressivism.Terrence Cuneo - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 1:35-71.
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  12.  49
    Plato and Davidson: Parts of the Soul and Weakness of Will.Terrence M. Penner - 1990 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (sup1):35-74.
  13.  22
    What Price Changing Laws of Nature?Olivier Sartenaer, Alexandre Guay & Paul Humphreys - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 11 (1):1-19.
    In this paper, we show that it is not a conceptual truth about laws of nature that they are immutable. In order to do so, we survey three popular accounts of lawhood— necessitarianism, dispositionalism and ‘best system analysis’—and expose the extent, as well as the philosophical cost, of the amendments that should be enforced in order to leave room for the possibility of changing laws.
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  14.  30
    The Tragic as an Ethical Category Robert Guay.Robert Guay - manuscript
    I. Introduction This paper aims to explain Nietzsche’s understanding of tragedy, and in particular his self-characterization as the “tragic philosopher.” What I shall claim is that, according to Nietzsche, to recognize the self-determining or self-creating character of our agency is to reveal it as tragic. Tragedy accordingly illuminates the most fundamental issue in Nietzsche’s mature philosophy: the possibility of affirmation.
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  15.  21
    Computational Neuroscience.Terrence J. Sejnowski - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):104-105.
  16.  86
    Moral Duties of Parents and Nontherapeutic Clinical Research Procedures Involving Children.Terrence F. Ackerman - 1980 - Journal of Medical Humanities 2 (2):94-111.
    Shared views regarding the moral respect which is owed to children in family life are used as a guide in determining the moral permissibility of nontherapeutic clinical research procedures involving children. The comparison suggests that it is not appropriate to seek assent from the preadolescent child. The analogy with interventions used in family life is similarly employed to specify the permissible limit of risk to which children may be exposed in nontherapeutic research procedures. The analysis indicates that recent writers misconceive (...)
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  17. A Refutation of Consequentialism.Robert Guay - 2005 - Metaphilosophy 36 (3):348-362.
    The thesis of this paper is that consequentialism does not work as a comprehensive theory of right action. This paper does not offer a typical refutation, in that I do not claim that consequentialism is self-contradictory. One can with perfect consistency claim that the good is prior to the right and that the right consists in maximizing the good. What I claim, however, is that it is senseless to make such a claim. In particular, I attempt to show that the (...)
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  18.  56
    The Hierarchic Logic of Emergence: Untangling the Interdependence of Evolution and Self-Organization.Terrence W. Deacon - 2003 - In Bruce H. Weber & David J. Depew (eds.), Evolution and Learning: The Baldwin Effect Reconsidered. MIT Press. pp. 273--308.
  19.  87
    A New Look at Emergence. Or When After is Different.Alexandre Guay & Olivier Sartenaer - 2016 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 6 (2):297-322.
    In this paper, we put forward a new account of emergence called “transformational emergence”. Such an account captures a variety of emergence that can be considered as being diachronic and weakly ontological. The fact that transformational emergence actually constitutes a genuine form of emergence is motivated. Besides, the account is free of traditional problems surrounding more usual, synchronic versions of emergence, and it can find a strong empirical support in a specific physical phenomenon, the fractional quantum Hall effect, which has (...)
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  20.  44
    An Ethical Framework for the Practice of Paying Research Subjects.Terrence F. Ackerman - 1988 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 11 (4):1-4.
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  21. Emergence: The Hole at the Wheel's Hub.Terrence Deacon - 2006 - In Philip Clayton & Paul Davies (eds.), The Re-Emergence of Emergence. Oxford University Press. pp. 111--50.
     
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  22.  44
    Plato and Davidson: Parts of the Soul and Weakness of Will.Terrence M. Penner - 1990 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (Supplement):35-74.
  23.  44
    Reciprocal Linkage Between Self-Organizing Processes is Sufficient for Self-Reproduction and Evolvability.Terrence W. Deacon - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (2):136-149.
    A simple molecular system is described consisting of the reciprocal linkage between an autocatalytic cycle and a self-assembling encapsulation process where the molecular constituents for the capsule are products of the autocatalysis. In a molecular environment sufficiently rich in the substrates, capsule growth will also occur with high predictability. Growth to closure will be most probable in the vicinity of the most prolific autocatalysis and will thus tend to spontaneously enclose supportive catalysts within the capsule interior. If subsequently disrupted in (...)
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  24. Symbolic Reasoning in Spiking Neurons: A Model of the Cortex/Basal Ganglia/Thalamus Loop.Terrence C. Stewart, Xuan Choo & Chris Eliasmith - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 1100--1105.
  25. The Neural Basis of Cognitive Development: A Constructivist Manifesto.Steven R. Quartz & Terrence J. Sejnowski - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):537-556.
    How do minds emerge from developing brains? According to the representational features of cortex are built from the dynamic interaction between neural growth mechanisms and environmentally derived neural activity. Contrary to popular selectionist models that emphasize regressive mechanisms, the neurobiological evidence suggests that this growth is a progressive increase in the representational properties of cortex. The interaction between the environment and neural growth results in a flexible type of learning: minimizes the need for prespecification in accordance with recent neurobiological evidence (...)
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  26.  18
    Multilevel Selection in a Complex Adaptive System: The Problem of Language Origins.Terrence W. Deacon - 2003 - In Bruce H. Weber & David J. Depew (eds.), Evolution and Learning: The Baldwin Effect Reconsidered. MIT Press. pp. 81--106.
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  27. Three Levels of Emergent Phenomena.Terrence Deacon - 2007 - In Nancey C. Murphy & William R. Stoeger (eds.), Evolution and Emergence: Systems, Organisms, Persons. Oxford University Press. pp. 88--110.
  28. Motion Integration and Postdiction in Visual Awareness.David M. Eagleman & Terrence J. Sejnowski - 2000 - Science 287 (5460):2036-2038.
  29.  79
    Neural Representation and Neural Computation.Patricia Smith Churchland & Terrence J. Sejnowski - 1990 - Philosophical Perspectives 4:343-382.
  30.  24
    To Be Continued: The Genidentity of Physical and Biological Processes.Alexandre Guay & Thomas Pradeu - 2016 - In Alexandre Guay & Thomas Pradeu (eds.), Individuals Across the Sciences. New York, État de New York, États-Unis: Oxford University Press. pp. 317-347.
    The concept of genidentity has been proposed as a way to better understand identity through time, especially in physics and biology. The genidentity view is utterly anti-substantialist in so far as it suggests that the identity of X through time does not presuppose whatsoever the existence of a permanent “core” or “substrate” of X. Yet applications of this concept to real science have been scarce and unsatisfying. In this paper, our aim is to show that a well-defined concept of functional (...)
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  31.  69
    Realistic Neurons Can Compute the Operations Needed by Quantum Probability Theory and Other Vector Symbolic Architectures.Terrence C. Stewart & Chris Eliasmith - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (3):307 - 308.
    Quantum probability (QP) theory can be seen as a type of vector symbolic architecture (VSA): mental states are vectors storing structured information and manipulated using algebraic operations. Furthermore, the operations needed by QP match those in other VSAs. This allows existing biologically realistic neural models to be adapted to provide a mechanistic explanation of the cognitive phenomena described in the target article by Pothos & Busemeyer (P&B).
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  32. Why Doctors Should Intervene.Terrence F. Ackerman - 1982 - Hastings Center Report 12 (4):14-17.
  33.  48
    Disability and Resurrection Identity.Terrence Ehrman - 2015 - New Blackfriars 96 (1066):723-738.
    Christian hope of resurrection requires that the one raised be the same person who died. Philosophers and theologians alike seek to understand the coherence of bodily resurrection and what accounts for numerical identity between the earthly and risen person. I address this question from the perspective of disability. Is a person with a disability raised in the age to come with that disability? Many theologians argue that disability is essential to one's identity such that it could not be eliminated in (...)
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  34. Right out of the box: how to situate metaphysics of science in relation to other metaphysical approaches.Alexandre Guay & Thomas Pradeu - 2020 - Synthese 197 (5):1847-1866.
    Several advocates of the lively field of “metaphysics of science” have recently argued that a naturalistic metaphysics should be based solely on current science, and that it should replace more traditional, intuition-based, forms of metaphysics. The aim of the present paper is to assess that claim by examining the relations between metaphysics of science and general metaphysics. We show that the current metaphysical battlefield is richer and more complex than a simple dichotomy between “metaphysics of science” and “traditional metaphysics”, and (...)
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  35.  25
    Omitting Types, Type Spectrums, and Decidability.Terrence Millar - 1983 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 48 (1):171-181.
  36.  10
    Recursive Categoricity and Persistence.Terrence Millar - 1986 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 51 (2):430-434.
  37. Intention, Emotion, and Action: A Neural Theory Based on Semantic Pointers.Tobias Schröder, Terrence C. Stewart & Paul Thagard - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (5):851-880.
    We propose a unified theory of intentions as neural processes that integrate representations of states of affairs, actions, and emotional evaluation. We show how this theory provides answers to philosophical questions about the concept of intention, psychological questions about human behavior, computational questions about the relations between belief and action, and neuroscientific questions about how the brain produces actions. Our theory of intention ties together biologically plausible mechanisms for belief, planning, and motor control. The computational feasibility of these mechanisms is (...)
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  38.  26
    Emergent Quasiparticles. Or How to Get a Rich Physics From a Sober Metaphysics.Alexandre Guay & Olivier Sartenaer - 2018 - In Melinda Fagan, Otávio Bueno & Ruey-Lin Chen (eds.), Individuation, Process and Scientific Practices. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 214-235.
    Among the very architects of the recent re-emergence of emergentism in the physical sciences, Robert B. Laughlin certainly occupies a prominent place. Through a series of works beginning as early as his Nobel lecture in 1998, a lecture given after having been awarded, together with Störmer and Tsui, the Nobel prize in physics for its contribution in the elucidation of the fractional quantum Hall effect, Laughlin openly and relentlessly advocated a strongly anti-reductionistic view of physics – and, more particularly, of (...)
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  39.  21
    Sociological Not Political: Rawls and the Reconstructive Social Sciences.Terrence Kelly - 2001 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (1):3-19.
    Like many critics of Rawls, Habermas believes that the Original Position (OP) implicitly utilizes normative (and unargued for) assumptions. The author defends the OP by arguing that its basic concepts are the product of a rational reconstruction of the everyday know-how, or common sense, employed by citizens in democratic practices. The author identifies this reconstruction in Rawls's work but suggests that while this answers the charge of circularity, it raises the problem of contextual relativism. It is concluded that Rawls can (...)
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  40.  6
    Sporting Practice Protection and Vulgar Ethnocentricity: Why Won't Morgan Go All the Way?Terrence J. Roberts - 1998 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 25 (1):71-81.
  41.  25
    Reconsidering Darwin’s “Several Powers”.Terrence W. Deacon - 2016 - Biosemiotics 9 (1):121-128.
    Contemporary textbooks often define evolution in terms of the replication, mutation, and selective retention of DNA sequences, ignoring the contribution of the physical processes involved. In the closing line of The Origin of Species, however, Darwin recognized that natural selection depends on prior more basic living functions, which he merely described as life’s “several powers.” For Darwin these involved the organism’s capacity to maintain itself and to reproduce offspring that preserve its critical functional organization. In modern terms we have come (...)
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  42.  3
    Introduction. Progressive Steps Toward a Unified Conception of Individuality Across the Sciences.Alexandre Guay & Thomas Pradeu - 2016 - In Alexandre Guay & Thomas Pradeu (eds.), Individuals Across the Sciences. New York, État de New York, États-Unis: Oxford University Press. pp. 1-21.
    This chapter introduces the main issues and themes of the volume. Approaches to individuality from metaphysics and philosophy of science are contrasted. Recent philosophical developments regarding concepts of biological and physical individuality are exposed. These research trends show how philosophy of physics and philosophy of biology address differently the question of what an individual is. Five main divergences are identified: the centrality of part-whole questions, the issue of identical individuals, the importance of the Principle of the Identity of Indiscernibles and, (...)
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  43.  82
    Monkey Homologues of Language Areas: Computing the Ambiguities.Terrence Deacon - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (7):288-290.
  44. A Partial Elucidation of the Gauge Principle.Alexandre Guay - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 39 (2):346-363.
    The elucidation of the gauge principle ‘‘is the most pressing problem in current philosophy of physics’’ said Michael Redhead in 2003. This paper argues for two points that contribute to this elucidation in the context of Yang–Mills theories. (1) Yang–Mills theories, including quantum electrodynamics, form a class. They should be interpreted together. To focus on electrodynamics is potentially misleading. (2) The essential role of gauge and BRST symmetries is to provide a local field theory that can be quantized and would (...)
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  45.  62
    Towards a Revised Probabilistic Basis for Quantum Mechanics.Terrence L. Fine - 1974 - Synthese 29 (1-4):187 - 201.
  46. Neural Representation and Neural Computation.Patricia S. Churchland & Terrence J. Sejnowski - 1989 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Philosophical Perspectives. MIT Press. pp. 343-382.
  47.  15
    The Aesthetic Faculty.Terrence Deacon - 2006 - In Mark Turner (ed.), The Artful Mind: Cognitive Science and the Riddle of Human Creativity. Oup Usa. pp. 21--53.
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  48.  23
    Prefrontal Cortex and Symbol Learning: Why a Brain Capable of Language Evolved Only Once.Terrence W. Deacon - 1996 - In B. Velichkovsky & Duane M. Rumbaugh (eds.), Communicating Meaning: The Evolution and Development of Language. Hillsdale, Nj: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. pp. 103--138.
  49.  84
    Iceberg Epistemology.David Henderson & Terrence Horgan - 2000 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 61 (3):497-535.
    Accounts of what it is for an agent to be justified in holding a belief commonly carry commitments concerning what cognitive processes can and should be like. A concern for the plausibility of such commitments leads to a multi-faceted epistemology in which elements of traditionally conflicting epistemologies are vindicated within a single epistemological account. The accessible and articulable states that have been the exclusive focus of much epistemology must constitute only a proper subset of epistemologically relevant processing. The interaction of (...)
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  50.  23
    Une objectivité kaléidoscopique : construire l'image scientifique du monde.Pierre-Alain Braillard, Alexandre Guay, Cyrille Imbert & Thomas Pradeu - 2011 - Philosophie 110 (3):46-71.
    Dans Science, Perception and Reality, Sellars distingue l’image manifeste de l’homme et l’image scientifique de l’homme. La première est obtenue à partir de la façon dont nous prenons conscience de nous-mêmes comme humains dans le monde. La seconde correspond à ce que les différentes sciences nous amènent à postuler sur la manière dont l’homme est constitué. Van Fraassen, lui, étend au monde ces concepts...
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