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Terrence C. Wright [11]Terrence Wright [2]
  1.  25
    Artistic Truth and the True Self in Edith Stein.Terrence C. Wright - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (1):127-142.
    This paper explores Stein’s treatment of truth and art as a way of approaching her philosophy of the self. Stein argues that one can distinguish between the truthof what something is and the truth of what something ought to be. She maintains that the work of art helps us to understand this distinction because it can serve as a revelation of the truth of what something is, but the work of art only succeeds when it also reflects what its subject (...)
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  2. Edith Stein: Prayer and Interiority.Terrence C. Wright - 2005 - In Bruce Ellis Benson & Norman Wirzba (eds.), The Phenomenology of Prayer. Fordham University Press.
     
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  3.  30
    “Green is Or”: Husserl and the Poets. [REVIEW]Terrence C. Wright - 1995 - Husserl Studies 12 (3):189-200.
  4.  14
    Husserl and Contemporary Thought. Edited by John Sallis.Terrence C. Wright - 1985 - Modern Schoolman 63 (1):73-75.
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  5.  24
    Husserl and Frege. By J. N. Mohanty.Terrence C. Wright - 1985 - Modern Schoolman 63 (1):77-78.
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  6.  16
    Heidegger and Heaney.Terrence C. Wright - 1994 - Philosophy Today 38 (4):390-399.
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  7.  15
    Libido: The French Existential Theories. By Alphonso Lingis.Terrence C. Wright - 1989 - Modern Schoolman 66 (3):245-246.
  8.  17
    The Matter of Minds. By Zeno Vendler.Terrence C. Wright - 1988 - Modern Schoolman 65 (2):147-148.
  9.  11
    Vocational Call.Terrence Wright & Susan Selner-Wright - 2010 - International Philosophical Quarterly 50 (3):323-334.
    The focus of this paper is the experience of vocational call and, in particular, three of its aspects: the source of the call, the form of the call, and the content of the call. It begins with a short reflection on Biblical accounts of vocation and then briefly contrasts that picture with the contemporary understanding of vocation as it is reflected in the thinking of Dewey, Weber, and Heidegger. It then explores Pope John Paul II’s creative retrieval of the original (...)
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