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  1.  12
    Review of Ariel Salleh, Ecofeminism as Politics. Nature, Marx and the Post-Modern (London & New Yrk: Zed Books, 1997). [REVIEW]Terri Field - 1999 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (2):237-239.
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  2.  9
    Caring Relationships with Natural and Artificial Environments.Terri Field - 1995 - Environmental Ethics 17 (3):307-320.
    A relational-self theory claims that one’s self is constituted by one’s relationships. The type of ethics that is said to arise from this concept of self is often called an ethics of care, whereby the focus of ethical deliberation is on preserving and nurturing those relationships. Some environmental philosophers advocating a relational-self theory tend to assume that the particular relationships that constitute the self will prioritize the natural world. I question this assumption by introducing the problem of artifact relationships. It (...)
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    Ethics and the Community of Inquiry: Education for Deliberative Democracy.Gilbert Burgh, Terri Field & Mark Freakley - 2006 - South Melbourne: Cengage/Thomson.
    Ethics and the Community of Inquiry gets to the heart of democratic education and how best to achieve it. The book radically reshapes our understanding of education by offering a framework from which to integrate curriculum, teaching and learning and to place deliberative democracy at the centre of education reform. It makes a significant contribution to current debates on educational theory and practice, in particular to pedagogical and professional practice, and ethics education.
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  4. Caring Relationships with the Natural and Artifical Environments.Terri Field - 1996 - Environmental Ethics 17 (3):307-320.
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  5. Caring Relationships with Natural and Artificial Environments.Terri Field - 1995 - Environmental Ethics 17 (3):307-320.
    A relational-self theory claims that one’s self is constituted by one’s relationships. The type of ethics that is said to arise from this concept of self is often called an ethics of care, whereby the focus of ethical deliberation is on preserving and nurturing those relationships. Some environmental philosophers advocating a relational-self theory tend to assume that the particular relationships that constitute the self will prioritize the natural world. I question this assumption by introducing the problem of artifact relationships. It (...)
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