8 found
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  1.  9
    Becoming Autonomous: Nonideal Theory and Educational Autonomy.Terri S. Wilson & Matthew A. Ryg - 2015 - Educational Theory 65 (2):127-150.
    Autonomy operates as a key term in debates about the rights of families to choose distinct approaches to education. Yet, what autonomy means is often complicated by the actual circumstances and contexts of schools, families, and children. In this essay, Terri S. Wilson and Matthew A. Ryg focus on the challenges involved in translating an ideal of educational autonomy into the “nonideal” contexts and circumstances that surround families' choices. Drawing on the methodological insights of Elizabeth Anderson and John Dewey, they (...)
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  2.  25
    Philosophy Pursued Through Empirical Research: Introduction to the Special Issue.Terri S. Wilson & Doris A. Santoro - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (2):115-124.
    Many scholars have pursued philosophical inquiry through empirical research. These empirical projects have been shaped—to varying degrees and in different ways—by philosophical questions, traditions, frameworks and analytic approaches. This issue explores the methodological challenges and opportunities involved in these kinds of projects. In this essay, we briefly introduce the nine projects featured in this issue and then address two key questions: First, how do these diverse contributors understand their empirical research as a mode of philosophical inquiry? And, second, what is (...)
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  3.  20
    Exploring the Moral Complexity of School Choice: Philosophical Frameworks and Contributions.Terri S. Wilson - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (2):181-191.
    In this essay, I describe some of the methodological dimensions of my ongoing research into how parents choose schools. I particularly focus on how philosophical frameworks and analytical strategies have shaped the empirical portion of my research. My goal, in this essay, is to trace and explore the ways in which philosophy of education—as a methodological orientation—may enable researchers to be attentive to the normative dimensions of human experience. In addition, I will argue that philosophically informed empirical research offers new (...)
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  4.  2
    When Is It Democratically Legitimate to Opt Out of Public Education?Michele S. Moses & Terri S. Wilson - 2020 - Educational Theory 70 (3):255-276.
  5.  20
    Civic Fragmentation or Voluntary Association? Habermas, Fraser, and Charter School Segregation.Terri S. Wilson - 2010 - Educational Theory 60 (6):643-664.
    In this essay, Terri Wilson puts the argument developed by Kathleen Knight Abowitz that charter schools could be considered as counterpublic spaces into interaction with empirical research that explores patterns of voluntary self‐segregation in charter schools. Wilson returns to the theoretical tension between Jürgen Habermas and Nancy Fraser over the inclusivity of the public sphere. Wilson argues that Fraser's concept of counterpublic space rests on an oversimplification of Habermas's concept of the public sphere and, further, that justifying school choice through (...)
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  6.  1
    Contesting Public Education: Opting Out, Dissent, and Activism.Terri S. Wilson - 2020 - Educational Theory 70 (3):247-254.
  7.  9
    Interest, Not Preference: Dewey and Reframing the Conceptual Vocabulary of School Choice.Terri S. Wilson - 2016 - Educational Theory 66 (1-2):147-163.
    School choice positions parents as consumers who select schools that maximize their preferences. This account has been shaped by rational choice theory. In this essay, Terri Wilson contrasts a rational choice framework of preferences with John Dewey's understanding of interest. To illustrate this contrast, she draws on an example of one parent's school decision-making process. Dewey's concept of interest offers an alternative conceptual vocabulary attentive to the complex, value-laden, and evolving process of choosing a school. Her analysis considers how schools (...)
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  8.  4
    Introduction to Section II: Dewey's Living Ideas.Terri S. Wilson & David I. Waddington - 2016 - Educational Theory 66 (1-2):89-94.