Results for 'Terrorism Philosophy'

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  1. Philosophy 9/11: Thinking About the War on Terrorism.Timothy Shanahan (ed.) - 2005 - Open Court.
    Fifteen philosophers turn their thoughts to international terrorism and the war that it has spawned, lending their expertise in law, ethics, politics, feminism, ...
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  2.  14
    Terrorism for Humanity: Inquiries in Political Philosophy.Ted Honderich - 2003 - London: Pluto Press.
    Wretchedness and terrorism, and differences we make between them -- A theory of justice, an anarchism, and the obligation to obey the law -- The principle of humanity -- Our omissions and their terrorism -- On democratic terrorism -- Doctrines, commitments, and four conclusions about terrorism for humanity.
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  3. Philosophy and International Law: Reflections on Interdisciplinary Research Into Terrorism.Anna Goppel & Anne Schwenkenbecher - 2012 - Ancilla Iuris 111.
    This essay investigates the possibilities and limits of interdisciplinary research into terrorism. It is shown that approaches that combine philosophy and international law are necessary, and when such an approach needs to be adopted. However, it is also important not to underestimate how much of a challenge is posed by the absence of agreement concerning the definition of terrorism, and also by the structural differences in the way the two disciplines address the problem and formulate the issues. (...)
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  4.  85
    Terrorism, Security, and Nationality: An Introductory Study in Applied Political Philosophy.Paul Gilbert - 1994 - Routledge.
    Terrorism, Security and Nationality shows how the concepts and methods of political philosophy can be applied to the practical problems of terrorism, state violence and national security. The book clarifies a wide range of issues in applied political philosophy, including the ethics of war, theories of state and nation, the relationship between communities and nationalisms, and the uneasy balance of human rights and national security. Ethnicity, national identity and the interests of the state, concepts commonly cited (...)
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  5.  9
    A Delicate Balance: What Philosophy Can Tell Us About Terrorism.Trudy Govier - 2002 - Westview Press.
    Did the world change on September 11, 2001? For those who live outside of New York or Washington, life's familiar pace persists and families and jobs resume their routines. Yet everything seems different because of the dramatic disturbance in our sense of what our world means and how we exist within it. In A Delicate Balance , philosopher Trudy Govier writes that it is because our feelings and attitudes have altered so fundamentally that our world has changed. Govier believes that (...)
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  6. Terrorism, Security, and Nationality: An Introductory Study in Applied Political Philosophy.Paul Gilbert - 1994 - Routledge.
    _Terrorism, Security and Nationality_ shows how the ideas and techniques of political philosophy can be applied to the practical problems of terrorism, State violence and national identity. In doing so it clarifies a wide range of issues in applied political philosophy including ethics of war; theories of state and nation; the relationship between communities and nationalisms; human rightss and national security. Paul Gilbert identifies conflicting conceptiona of civil strife by different political communities and investigates notions of (...) both as unjust war and as political crime. He concludes by considering the proper response of the State to political violence. (shrink)
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  7. PHILOSOPHY 87 the Morality of Terrorism Spring, 2006.Richard Arneson - manuscript
    What is "terrorism"? Under what circumstances, if any, is terrorism morally acceptable? This course examines theories of just war and just warfare. The theories aim to specify under what circumstances and in what ways--in the context of waging war-- it is morally acceptable to kill people. One question that arises here is whether or not there are types of killings and threatened killings that are always wrong, whatever the consequences. Another question that arises is what it is morally (...)
     
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  8. Terrorism, Security and Nationality: An Introductory Study in Applied Political Philosophy.Paul Gilbert - 1995 - Routledge.
    _Terrorism, Security and Nationality_ shows how the ideas and techniques of political philosophy can be applied to the practical problems of terrorism, State violence and national identity. In doing so it clarifies a wide range of issues in applied political philosophy including ethics of war; theories of state and nation; the relationship between communities and nationalisms; human rightss and national security. Paul Gilbert identifies conflicting conceptiona of civil strife by different political communities and investigates notions of (...) both as unjust war and as political crime. He concludes by considering the proper response of the State to political violence. (shrink)
     
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  9.  12
    Terrorism: A Philosophical Investigation.Igor Primoratz - 2012 - Polity.
    Defining terrorism -- State terrorism and counterterrorism -- Complicity of the victims -- The consequences of terrorism -- Terrorism, rights, and justice -- Terrorism, supreme emergency, and moral disaster -- Is terrorism morally distinctive? -- Case study : terror bombing of German cities -- Case study : terrorism in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
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  10.  45
    Terrorism: The Philosophical Issues.Igor Primoratz (ed.) - 2004 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This is the first comprehensive discussion of all the main philosophical issues raised by terrorism against the background of its past and recent developments. Prominent philosophers discuss definitions of terrorism, approaches to its moral evaluation, and the contentious subject of state terrorism. Also included are four case studies, showing how the concepts and arguments philosophers deploy in discussing violence, war and terrorism apply to particular instances of both insurgent and state terrorism, ranging from World War (...)
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  11.  47
    Terrorism and the Philosophy of History: Liberalism, Realism, and the Supreme Emergency Exemption.Andrew Fiala - 2002 - Essays in Philosophy 3 (3):2.
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  12. Terrorism: A Guide to Fearful Times Based on a Philosophy of Fearism.R. M. Fisher & D. Subba - unknown
    The authors, each with their own independent history of study of fear and fearlessness have recently been in dialogue and are creating a synthesis of a growing movement called philosophy of fearism. This philosophy, an extension of existential philosophy, is shown in this technical paper....
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  13. Philosophy in the Wake of the September 21st Terrorist Attacks.Thomas Fowler - 2001 - The Xavier Zubiri Review 3:3-4.
  14. Terrorism, Security and Nationality: An Introductory Study in Applied Political Philosophy.Paul Gilbert - 1996 - Philosophy 71 (275):162-164.
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  15.  27
    Humanity, Terrorism, Terrorist War: Palestine, 9/11, Iraq, 7/7…, by Ted Honderich, London: Continuum, Pp. VII + 206, £12.99the Philosophy of War and Peace, by Jenny Teichman, Exeter: Imprint Academic, Pp. VIII + 260, £17.95. [REVIEW]Paul Gilbert - 2007 - Philosophy 82 (4):661-665.
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  16. Terrorism and War.Virginia Held - 2004 - The Journal of Ethics 8 (1):59-75.
    There are different kinds of terrorism as there are of war. It is unpersuasive to make the deliberate targeting of civilians a defining feature of terrorism, and states as well as non-state groups can engage in terrorism. In a democracy, voters responsible for a government’s unjustifiable policies are not necessarily innocent, while conscripts are legitimate targets. Rather than being uniquely atrocious, terrorism most resembles small war. It is not always or necessarily more morally unjustifiable than war. (...)
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  17.  93
    Terrorism: A Philosophical Enquiry.Anne Schwenkenbecher - 2012 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- PART I: DEFINING 'TERRORISM' -- On The Current Debate On Defining Terrorism -- What Is Terrorism? -- PART II: ETHICS OF TERRORISM OR CAN TERRORISM EVER BE PERMISSIBLE? -- Innocents and Non-Innocents -- Terrorism Against Non-Innocents -- Terrorism Against Innocents -- Collateral Damage -- Concluding Remarks -- References -- Index.
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  18.  7
    Terrorism, Security and Nationality: An Introductory Study in Applied Political Philosophy By Paul Gilbert, London and New York: Routledge, 1994, Vii + 190 Pp., £12.99. [REVIEW]Ian Chowcat - 1996 - Philosophy 71 (275):162-.
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  19. Terrorism, Retribution, and Collective Responsibility.Mark R. Reiff - 2008 - Social Theory and Practice 34 (2):209-242.
    Terrorism is commonly viewed as a form of war, and as a form of war, the morality of terrorism seems to turn on the usual arguments regarding the furtherance of political objectives through coercive means. The terrorist argues that his options for armed struggle are limited, and that the use of force against civilians is the only way he can advance his cause. But this argument is subject to a powerful response. There is the argument from consequences, which (...)
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  20. Terrorism and Just War.Michael Walzer - 2006 - Philosophia 34 (1):3-12.
  21. Terrorism, Justification, and Illusion.Saul Smilansky - 2004 - Ethics 114 (4):790-805.
    Bernard Williams once said that doing moral philosophy could be hazardous because there, presumably unlike in other areas of philosophy, we may run the risk of misleading people on important matters.1 This risk seems to be particularly present when considering the topic of terrorism. I would like to discuss what seems to be a most striking feature of contemporary terrorism, a feature that, as far as I know, has not been noted. This has implications concerning the (...)
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  22.  33
    Terrorism and the Ethics of War: Responses to Joan McGregor, Sally Scholz, and Matthew Silliman.Stephen Nathanson - 2012 - Social Philosophy Today 28:187-198.
    The primary thesis of Terrorism and the Ethics of War is that terrorist acts are always wrong. I begin this paper by describing two views that I criticize in the book The first condemns all terrorism but applies the term in a biased way; the second defends some terrorist acts. I then respond to issues raised by the commentators. I discuss Joan McGregor’s concerns about the definition of terrorism and about how terrorism differs from other forms (...)
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  23.  36
    Opportunistic Terrorism.Suzanne Uniacke - 2014 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (4):395-410.
    This paper critically addresses two central aspects of Frances Kamm’s account of conceptual and evaluative issues of terrorism in ‘Terrorism and Intending Evil’, Ethics for Enemies (oup 2011), chapter 2. The paper engages with what Kamm says about cases in which an act done from a morally bad intention or motive overtly exactly mimics a justifiable act. I argue that in such a case, an actor’s intention to terrorise is more significant to the question of whether what he (...)
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  24. Terrorism and Innocence.C. A. J. Coady - 2004 - The Journal of Ethics 8 (1):37-58.
    This paper begins with a discussion of different definitions of “terrorism” and endorses one version of a tactical definition, so-called because it treats terrorism as involving the use of a quite specific tactic in the pursuit of political ends, namely, violent attacks upon the innocent. This contrasts with a political status definition in which “terrorism” is defined as any form of sub-state political violence against the state. Some consequences of the tactical definition are explored, notably the fact (...)
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  25.  83
    Terrorism and the Ethics of War.Stephen Nathanson - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Stephen Nathanson argues that we cannot have morally credible views about terrorism if we focus on terrorism alone and neglect broader issues about the ethics ...
  26. From Hegel to Terrorism, and Other Essays on the Dynamic Nature of Philosophy.James Kern Feibleman - 1985 - Humanities Press.
  27. Torture, Terrorism and the State: A Refutation of the Ticking-Bomb Argument.Vittorio Bufacchi & Jean Maria Arrigo - 2006 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (3):355–373.
  28.  1
    Terror, Terrorism, States, and Societies: A Historical and Philosophical Perspective.Samir Kumar Das & Rada Iveković (eds.) - 2010 - Women Unlimited.
    section 1. Reason, language, and the self -- section 2. Law, emergency, and exception -- section 3. Terrorism as a paradigm of (in)security -- section 4. Terrorism and the crisis of the political.
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  29. Intimations of Moral Philosophy, By Way of War and Terrorism.Joseph Margolis - 2007 - Ars Disputandi 7.
     
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  30. Is Terrorism Morally Distinctive?Samuel Scheffler - 2006 - Journal of Political Philosophy 14 (1):1-17.
  31. Modern Social Imaginaries; Terrorism for Humanity: Inquiries in Political Philosophy[REVIEW]Monica Mookherjee - 2004 - Radical Philosophy 126.
     
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  32. Terrorism and Torture.Fritz Allhoff - 2003 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (1):121-134.
    This paper investigates the moral permissibility of torture. After briefly considering some empirical evidence, it discusses the conflict between deontological and consequentialist approaches to torture. It is argued that, even if we are to take rights seriously, torture should at least be allowed if some conditions are satisfied. Finally, the paper discusses what those conditions should be and what sorts of torture are morally permissible.
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  33.  13
    “Organizational Terrorism” and Moral Choices – Exercising Voice When the Leader is the Problem.Cam Caldwell & Mayra Canuto-Carranco - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):159-171.
    We introduce the concept of “organizational terrorism” to describe dysfunctional leaders who are abusive and who treat organizational members with contempt and disregard. After identifying the moral duties of leaders in organizations, we explain how organization members respond to their dissatisfaction with organizations through Exit, Voice, Loyalty, or Neglect. We explain why exercising voice is the most effective moral choice in dealing with dysfunctional leaders.
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  34. Defining Terrorism for Public Policy Purposes: The Group-Target Definition.Eric Reitan - 2010 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (2):253-278.
    For the sake of developing and evaluating public policy decisions aimed at combating terrorism, we need a precise public definition of terrorism that distinguishes terrorism from other forms of violence. Ordinary usage does not provide a basis for such a definition, and so it must be stipulative. I propose essentially pragmatic criteria for developing such a stipulative public definition. After noting that definitions previously proposed in the philosophical literature are inadequate based on these criteria, I propose an (...)
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  35.  30
    Revolutionary Terrorism, Crime and Morality.Robert Young - 1977 - Social Theory and Practice 4 (3):287-302.
  36. Terrorism, War, and The Killing of the Innocent.Troy Jollimore - 2007 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (4):353-372.
    Commonsense moral thought holds that what makes terrorism particularly abhorrent is the fact that it tends to be directed toward innocent victims. Yet contemporary philosophers tend to doubt that the concept of innocence plays any significant role here, and to deny that prohibitions against targeting noncombatants can be justified through appeal to their moral innocence. I argue, however, that the arguments used to support these doubts are ultimately unsuccessful. Indeed, the philosophical positions in question tend to misunderstand the justification (...)
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  37.  18
    Terrorism, Trauma, Tolerance: Bearing Witness to White Supremacist Attack on Muslims in Christchurch, New Zealand.Tina Besley & Michael A. Peters - 2020 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 52 (2):109-119.
    Volume 52, Issue 2, February 2020, Page 109-119.
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  38.  62
    Terrorism and Pacifism: Why We Should Condemn Both.Jan Narveson - 2003 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (2):157-172.
    Pacifism and terrorism are at opposite ends of one spectrum: pacifists have too many friends; terrorists have too many enemies. The indiscriminacy robs both of any credibility. Both fail to distinguish between aggressors and their victims. Discussion of terrorism, however, is complicated by insufficient attention to the distinction between noncombatants and innocents. Just War theory relies heavily on that distinction, providing protections to noncombatants as such, without going into the further question of innocence. Terrorism thus violates the (...)
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  39. Terrorism and Torture.Fritz Allhoff - 2003 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (1):121-134.
    After the events of 9/11, the concept of torture has emerged as one that is both pertinent and provoking. National polls have shown that some Americans support torture in some situations, though the majority still stand opposed. Torture has not received a tremendous amount of discussion in the philosophical literature, though I suspect that the leftward slant of academia would, for the most part, ensure limited support for torture. In this paper, I would like to first discuss why torture is (...)
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  40.  49
    Terrorism and Collective Responsibility: A Response to Narveson and Rosenbaum.Seumas Miller - 2004 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (2):263-281.
    In this paper I consider the general view of terrorism put forward by Jan Narveson in his “Pacificism and Terrorism: Why We Should Condemn Both” and by Alan Rosenbaum in his “On Terrorism and the Just War: Some Philosophical Reflections.” This is the view that terrorism is morally indefensible. Contra Narveson and Rosenbaum, I argue that some forms of terrorism are morally defensible in some circumstances.In the first section of the paper I will discuss the (...)
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  41.  39
    Terrorism and Trauma: Negotiating Derridean 'Autoimmunity'.Marguerite La Caze - 2011 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (5):605-619.
    I begin by examining the logic of autoimmunity as characterized by Jacques Derrida, ‘that strange behaviour where a living being, in quasi-suicidal fashion, ‘‘itself’’ works to destroy its own protection, to immunize itself against its own immunity’ (Borradori, 2003: 94). According to Derrida, religion, democracy, terrorism and recent responses to the trauma of terrorism can be understood in terms of this logic. Responses to terrorism are ‘autoimmune’ and increase the trauma of terrorism as well as risking (...)
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  42.  65
    Violence, Terrorism, and Moral Inquiry.Virginia Held - 1984 - The Monist 67 (4):605-626.
    The moral problems of violence or terrorism arise in actual contexts. Addressing them may be thought to be a task for “applied ethics.” But only if we would have adequate normative theories suitable for the diverse contexts of human experience would we be in a position to make valid “applications” of ethical theory. Along with many others, I doubt that we now have such theories. But I think that the moral views and judgments we can come to in exploring (...)
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  43. What is Terrorism, Why is It Wrong, and Could It Ever Be Morally Permissible?Alison M. Jaggar - 2005 - Journal of Social Philosophy 36 (2):202–217.
    In the liberal democracies of North America and the European Union, terrorism is almost universally condemned. Moreover, few wish to question the“moral clarity” that denies any “moral equivalence” between terrorists and thosewho fight them (Held 2004, 59–60). However, the seeming consensus on the moral reprehensibility of terrorism is undermined by substantial disagreementabout just what terrorism is. The primary purpose of this paper is to propose an account of terrorism capable of facilitating a more productive moral debate. (...)
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  44.  34
    On Terrorism and the Just War: Some Philosophical Reflections.Alan S. Rosenbaum - 2003 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (2):173-196.
    In my article I defend the claim that terrorism is morally indefensible, irrespective of the religious or political circumstances and motives behind the actions of its agents and sponsors. My argument is based on the indefeasible presupposition of modern civilization and our human rights culture that, like the prohibition against murder in the law of crimes, the deliberate killing of innocent civilian non-combatants—the principle target of terrorists—destroys the cardinal value of the sacrosanctity of all individual human life by making (...)
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  45.  50
    Defining Terrorism – a Typology.Tamar Meisels - 2009 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 12 (3):331-351.
    This paper argues that philosophers require a strict canonical definition of terrorism if they are to be of any use in morally evaluating the changing character war. This definition ought to be a narrow, critical one, articulating precisely what is wrong with terrorism and strictly specifying which incidents fall into this derogatory category and which do not. I argue against those who avoid definitions or adopt wide and apologetic ones. The latter claim neutrality for themselves and accuse those (...)
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  46. Defining Terrorism.Scott C. Lowe - 2006 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 2:253-256.
    The purpose of this paper is to argue against a certain view of what terrorism is. In particular, I wish to dispute the definition of terrorism used by philosophers Andrew Vails and Angelo Corlett who separately put forward arguments defending the possibility of morally legitimate acts of terrorism. In support of this conclusion, they each employ a broad definition of terrorism that makes room for highly discriminate, i.e., precisely targeted, acts of political violence to count as (...)
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  47. Female Terrorists: What Difference Does Gender Make?Marilyn Friedman - 2007 - Social Philosophy Today 23:189-200.
    Should women’s terrorist acts be understood differently than similar acts carried out by men? Does the gender identity of a terrorist make a difference to the meaning of a terrorist’s acts? Commentators who explain women’s involvement in terrorism often offer explanations other than political commitment. They often refer instead to factors in the women’s personal relationships, thereby drawing on gender stereotypes and diminishing the women’s political commitments. I suggest instead that terrorism by a woman involves symbolic political “testimony.” (...)
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  48. The Epistemology of Terrorism and Radicalisation.Quassim Cassam - 2018 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84:187-209.
    This paper outlines and criticises two models of terrorism, the Rational Agent Model and the Radicalisation Model. A different and more plausible conception of the turn to violence is proposed. The proposed account is Moderate Epistemic Particularism, an approach partly inspired by Karl Jaspers’ distinction between explanation and understanding. On this account there are multiple idiosyncratic pathways to cognitive and behavioural radicalisation, and the actions and motivations of terrorists can only be understood by engaging with their subjectivity in a (...)
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  49.  54
    On Terrorism and Lost Rationality: Reply to Rosenbaum.Seumas Miller - 2006 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1):173-176.
    This article is a reply to Alan Rosenbaum’s reply to my reply to his orginal article on terrorism and collective responsibility. As before, and contra Rosenbaum, I argue that some forms of terrorism in some circumstances might be morally justified. This position is consistent with holding the terrorist acts of groups such as Hamas and al-Qaeda to be morally unjustifiable. An example of a possibly morally justifiable form of terrorism was that practised by the African National Congress (...)
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  50.  64
    Explaining Terrorism.Kristin Andrews - 2006 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 9:167-171.
    The official explanations the US gave for the September 11th terrorist attacks are not in fact explanatory, and there has been popular condemnation of those who attempt to offer causal explanations for the attacks. This paper is an investigation of the difficulty people have with finding and accepting explanations for acts they strongly condemn. Using research in the philosophy of mind and moral psychology, I distinguish between explanations for actual immoral behavior and explanations for fictional immoral behavior. The difficulty (...)
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