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  1.  8
    The Incredible Complexity of Being? Degrees of Influence, Coercion, and Control of the “Autonomy” of Severe and Enduring Anorexia Nervosa Patients.Terry Carney - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (1):41-42.
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  2.  2
    Reconceptualizing Involuntary Outpatient Psychiatric Treatment: From "Capacity" to "Capability".M. Light Edwina, D. Robertson Michael, H. Kerridge Ian, Boyce Philip, Carney Terry, Rosen Alan, Cleary Michelle, E. Hunt Glenn & O'Connor Nick - 2016 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 23 (1):33-45.
    Justifying involuntary psychiatric treatment on the basis of a judgment that a person lacks capacity is usually expressed in terms of a person’s ability to make a decision about his or her health and treatment. Typically, this relates to the ability to refuse treatment. Exactly what “capacity” means, however, and how one determines when another individual lacks capacity, or lacks sufficient capacity, in this context is particularly controversial, with the United Nations Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities insisting (...)
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    Planning for Pandemics: Lessons From the Past Decade.Belinda Bennett & Terry Carney - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (3):419-428.
    It is now 10 years since the disease we now know as SARS—severe acute respiratory syndrome—caused more than 700 deaths around the world and made more than 8,000 people ill. More recently, in 2009 the global community experienced the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century—the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. This paper analyses the major developments in international public health law relating to infectious diseases in the period since SARS and considers their implications for pandemic planning.
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    Why (and When) Clinicians Compel Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa Patients.Terry Carney, David Tait, Stephen Touyz & Alice Richardson - unknown
    OBJECTIVE: This paper addresses the question of the circumstances which lead clinicians to use legal coercion in the management of patients with severe anorexia nervosa, and explores similarities and differences between such formal coercion and other forms of 'strong persuasion' in patient management. METHOD: Logistic regression and other statistical analysis was undertaken on 75 first admissions for anorexia nervosa from a sample of 117 successive admissions to an eating disorder facility in New South Wales, Australia, where an eating disorder was (...)
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