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  1. Leadership Ethics: An Introduction.Terry L. Price - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    Are leaders morally special? Is there something ethically distinctive about the relationship between leaders and followers? Should leaders do whatever it takes to achieve group goals? Leadership Ethics uses moral theory, as well as empirical research in psychology, to evaluate the reasons everyday leaders give to justify breaking the rules. Written for people without a background in philosophy, it introduces readers to the moral theories that are relevant to leadership ethics: relativism, amoralism, egoism, virtue ethics, social contract theory, situation ethics, (...)
     
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  2.  16
    Ethical Decision Making and Leadership: Merging Social Role and Self-Construal Perspectives.Crystal L. Hoyt & Terry L. Price - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (4):531-539.
    This research extends our understanding of ethical decision making on the part of leaders by merging social role and self-construal perspectives. Interdependent self-construal is generally seen as enhancing concern for justice and moral values. Across two studies, we tested the prediction that non-leading group members’ interdependent self-construal would be associated with lower levels of unethical decision making on behalf of their group but that, in contrast, this relationship would be weaker for leaders, given their social role. These predictions were experimentally (...)
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  3.  47
    Are Williams’s Reasons Problematically External After All?Terry L. Price - 1999 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (3):461-478.
  4.  14
    Explaining Ethical Failures of Leadership.Terry L. Price - 2004 - In Joanne B. Ciulla (ed.), Ethics, the Heart of Leadership. Praeger. pp. 129--146.
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  5.  19
    Conscience and Corporate Culture, by Kenneth Goodpaster. Oxford: Blackwell, 2007.Terry L. Price - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (1):131-141.
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    Egalitarian Justice, Luck, and the Costs of Chosen Ends.Terry L. Price - 1999 - American Philosophical Quarterly 36 (4):267 - 278.
  7.  12
    Faultless Mistake of Fact: Justification or Excuse?Terry L. Price - 1993 - Criminal Justice Ethics 12 (2):14-28.
  8.  20
    Counterexamples and Prophylactics.Terry L. Price - 1994 - Philosophical Studies 74 (3):273 - 282.
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  9.  14
    Aristotle and The Good Business Life.Terry L. Price - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (2):325-340.
  10.  17
    Epistemological Restraint—Revisited.Terry L. Price - 2000 - Journal of Political Philosophy 8 (3):401–407.
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  11.  8
    Mayerfeld, Jamie. Suffering and Moral Responsibility.Terry L. Price - 2002 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (4):870-871.
  12. Mistakes and Moral Blameworthiness: An Account of the Excusing Force of Faultless Mistakes of Fact and Faultless Mistakes of Morality.Terry L. Price - 1998 - Dissertation, The University of Arizona
    It is a commonplace to hold that faultless mistakes of fact justify--or, at least, excuse--an agent's actions. Less prominent, however, is the view that faultless mistakes about morality similarly come to bear on our attributions of moral blameworthiness. My aim in this dissertation is to defend what I call the symmetry thesis: faultless mistakes of morality excuse just as do faultless mistakes of fact. Opposition to this thesis, I think, falls out of an incorrect understanding of the way in which (...)
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  13. Rawls on Fairness to Conceptions of the Good.Terry L. Price - 1996
     
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  14. Suffering and Moral Responsibility. [REVIEW]Terry L. Price - 2002 - Review of Metaphysics 55 (4):870-870.
    Mayerfeld’s aim in this work is to defend “the claim that we are subject to a prima facie duty to relieve suffering” and to clarify “the content of that duty”. In his analysis, Mayerfeld takes suffering in a psychological sense, that is, in the sense of how it feels to individuals. He denies the hedonistic utilitarian’s claim that only happiness and suffering are relevant to wellbeing or, for that matter, to morality. Nevertheless, Mayerfeld embraces a hedonistic conception of happiness and (...)
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