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Tess Johnson
Oxford University
  1. The Ethics of Genetic Enhancement: Key Concepts and Future Prospects.Jonathan Anomaly & Tess Johnson - forthcoming - In The Ethics of Human Enhancement. London: Routledge Press.
  2.  4
    Enhancing the Collectivist Critique: Accounts of the Human Enhancement Debate.Tess Johnson - 2021 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 1 (4):721-730.
    Individualist ethical analyses in the enhancement debate have often prioritised or only considered the interests and concerns of parents and the future child. The collectivist critique of the human enhancement debate argues that rather than pure individualism, a focus on collectivist, or group-level ethical considerations is needed for balanced ethical analysis of specific enhancement interventions. Here, I defend this argument for the insufficiency of pure individualism. However, existing collectivist analyses tend to take a negative approach that hinders them from adequately (...)
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    Funder Priority for Vaccines: Implications of a Weak Lockean Claim.Anantharaman Muralidharan, G. Owen Schaefer, Tess Johnson & Julian Savulescu - forthcoming - Bioethics.
    The development of some COVID-19 vaccines by private companies like Moderna and Sanofi-GSK has been substantially funded by various governments. While the Sanofi CEO has previously suggested that countries that fund this development ought to be given some priority, this suggestion has not been taken seriously in the literature. Considerations of nationalism, sustainability, need, and equitability have been more extensively discussed with respect to whether and how much a country is entitled to advance purchase orders of the vaccine under conditions (...)
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    Funder Priority for Vaccines: Implications of a Weak Lockean Claim.Anantharaman Muralidharan, G. Owen Schaefer, Tess Johnson & Julian Savulescu - forthcoming - Wiley: Bioethics.
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  5.  15
    Free to Decide: The Positive Moral Right to Reproductive Choice.Tess Johnson - 2021 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 31 (3):303-326.
    The advent of novel assisted reproductive technologies has considerably expanded our sphere of control over our reproduction, and consequently, the scope of ethical debate surrounding reproductive choice. The widespread availability of genetic selection, in particular, raises questions regarding what reproductive choice does and should entail. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for genetic selection builds on in vitro fertilization. It forces us to confront questions of whether a moral right to reproductive choice extends not only to the decisions whether to have children and (...)
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  6.  6
    Towards Responsible, Lawful and Ethical Data Processing: Patient Data in the UK.Tess Johnson, Konrad Kollnig & Pierre Dewitte - 2022 - Internet Policy Review 1 (11).
    In May 2021, the UK National Health Service (NHS) proposed a scheme—called General Practice Data for Planning Research (GPDPR)—for sharing patients’ data. Under that system, a patient who does not wish to participate must actively opt out of their data being shared with third parties for research and other purposes. In this paper, we analyse the lessons that can be learned for the responsible and ethical governance of health data from the NHS’ new scheme. More specifically, we explore the extent (...)
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  7.  12
    A Trade‐Off: Antimicrobial Resistance and COVID‐19.Tess Johnson - 2021 - Wiley: Bioethics 1 (1):1-9.
    As we combat the COVID-19 pandemic, both the prescription of antimicrobials and the use of biocidal agents have increased in many countries. Although these measures can be expected to benefit existing people by, to some extent, mitigating the pandemic's effects, they may threaten long-term well-being of existing and future people, where they contribute to the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). A trade-off dilemma thus presents itself: combat COVID-19 using these measures, or stop using them in order to protect against AMR. (...)
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  8.  10
    A Trade-Off: Antimicrobial Resistance and COVID-19.Tess Johnson - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (9):947-955.
    As we combat the COVID-19 pandemic, both the prescription of antimicrobials and the use of biocidal agents have increased in many countries. Although these measures can be expected to benefit existing people by, to some extent, mitigating the pandemic's effects, they may threaten long-term well-being of existing and future people, where they contribute to the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). A trade-off dilemma thus presents itself: combat COVID-19 using these measures, or stop using them in order to protect against AMR. (...)
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  9.  15
    In Defense of Heritable Human Genome Editing: On the Geneva Statement by Andorno Et Al.Tess Johnson - 2020 - Trends in Biotechnology 3 (39):218-219.
    A paper by Andorno and colleagues, recently published in Trends in Biotechnology, condemns support for heritable human genome editing (HHGE) that is claimed to be premature and to have occurred without sufficient public consultation. The general message of the paper is welcome in its emphasis on the importance of gaining broader perspectives on the uses and regulation of HHGE before calls for clinical use are made. However, some problematic arguments for their position lead them to seemingly condemn not only current (...)
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  10.  4
    Genetic Immunisation.Tess Johnson & Alberto Giubilini - 2021 - In David Edmonds (ed.), Future Morality. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    [book blurb:] The world is changing so fast that it's hard to know how to think about what we ought to do. We barely have time to reflect on how scientific advances will affect our lives before they're upon us. New kinds of dilemma are springing up. Can robots be held responsible for their actions? Will artificial intelligence be able to predict criminal activity? Is the future gender-fluid? Should we strive to become post-human? Should we use drugs to improve our (...)
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