Results for 'Tetsuro Muraoka'

106 found
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  1.  12
    Corticospinal Excitability Modulation in Resting Digit Muscles During Cyclical Movement of the Digits of the Ipsilateral Limb.Tetsuro Muraoka, Masanori Sakamoto, Nobuaki Mizuguchi, Kento Nakagawa & Kazuyuki Kanosue - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  2.  12
    Muscle Relaxation of the Foot Reduces Corticospinal Excitability of Hand Muscles and Enhances Intracortical Inhibition.Kouki Kato, Tetsuro Muraoka, Nobuaki Mizuguchi, Kento Nakagawa, Hiroki Nakata & Kazuyuki Kanosue - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  3.  6
    6. Watsuji Tetsurō.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 72-77.
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  4.  21
    Watsuji Tetsuro's Rinrigaku: Ethics in Japan.David B. Gordon, Watsuji Tetsuro, Yamamoto Seisaku & Robert E. Carter - 1999 - Philosophy East and West 49 (2):216.
  5.  28
    Watsuji Tetsuro's Rinrigaku: Ethics in Japan.Watsuji Tetsuro - 1996 - State University of New York Press.
    Watsuji's Rinrigaku (literally, the principles that allow us to live in friendly community) has been regarded as the definitive study of Japanese ethics for half a century.
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  6.  14
    2. Dōgen’s Period of Self-Cultivation.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 34-44.
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  7.  11
    7. Concerning Social Problems.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 78-81.
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  8.  10
    1. Preface.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 25-33.
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  9.  10
    4. The Method and Meaning of Self-Cultivation.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 52-60.
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  10.  9
    8. Criticism of Art.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 82-84.
  11.  6
    9. Dōgen’s “Truth”.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 85-118.
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  12.  6
    5. Shinran’s Compassion and Dōgen’s Compassion.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 61-71.
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  13.  6
    3. The First Sermon.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2017 - In Steve Bein (ed.), Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 45-51.
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  14.  10
    L’État.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2008 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 64 (2):345-357.
    Dans la section de Rinrigaku intitulée «L’État», Watsuji Tetsuro définit l’État en tant que «communauté éthique des communautés éthiques». Ce qu’il entend par là, c’est que l’État, pour lui, est la communauté la plus englobante, celle qui n’a pas d’égoïsme et qui place chacune des communautés de rang inférieur dans une structure totalement éthique. Watsuji voit donc l’État comme la forme la plus achevée de communauté. Il considère aussi que l’État, en tant que communauté englobante, peut moralement utiliser la (...)
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  15.  9
    Extraits de Fūdo.Watsuji Tetsurō - 2008 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 64 (2):327-344.
    Fudo , publié en 1935, est l’ouvrage le plus célèbre de Watsuji Tetsuro , au-delà même de son oeuvre majeure, Éthique . Il a été reçu en effet principalement comme un essai sur l’identité japonaise. Mais définir l’identité japonaise n’était pas pour Watsuji l’objectif principal de ce livre. Fudo a été conçu en réponse à Sein und Zeit de Heidegger. À l’accent mis sur la temporalité par le maître livre, il répond en mettant l’accent sur la spatialité; et à (...)
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  16. Mind Control–Final Report.Elliott Donlon, Mark Muraoka, Junjie Zhu & Team West Pacifc - forthcoming - Mind.
     
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  17. Studies in Shinto Thought.Tsunetsugu Muraoka - 1964 - Greenwood Press.
  18.  7
    A Grammar of Egyptian Aramaic.John Huehnergard, Takamitsu Muraoka & Bezalel Porten - 2002 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 122 (3):604.
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  19.  7
    Studies in Ancient Hebrew Semantics.Gary Long & Takamitsu Muraoka - 1999 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 119 (1):153.
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  20.  9
    La Signification de l'Éthique En Tant Qu'étude de l'Être Humain.Watsuji Tetsurô, Bernard Stevens & Tadanori Takada - 2003 - Philosophie 79 (4):5.
  21.  14
    The Edinburgh-2 Coma Scale: A New Scale for Assessing Impaired Consciousness.K. Sugiura, K. Muraoka, T. Chishiki & M. Baba - 1983 - Neurosurgery 12:411-15.
  22.  4
    Modern Hebrew for Biblical Scholars: An Annotated Chrestomathy with an Outline Grammar and a Glossary.Stuart Creason & Takamitsu Muraoka - 2000 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 120 (4):654.
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  23. Ethical Principles in Palliative Medicine.Shimizu Tetsuro - unknown
    In the present paper I try to show that ethical principles of medical activities in general can be adequately applied to medical activities for the patient in his terminal stage. For this objective, I shall argue first what are the principles and rules of medical activities in general, and then show how these can be applied to palliative medicine.
     
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  24.  6
    The Buddhist Roots of Watsuji Tetsurô's Ethics of Emptiness.Anton Luis Sevilla - 2016 - Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (4):606-635.
    Watsuji Tetsurô is famous for having constructed a systematic socio-political ethics on the basis of the idea of emptiness. This essay examines his 1938 essay “The Concept of ‘Dharma’ and the Dialectics of Emptiness in Buddhist Philosophy” and the posthumously published The History of Buddhist Ethical Thought, in order to clarify the Buddhist roots of his ethics. It aims to answer two main questions which are fundamentally linked: “Which way does Watsuji's legacy turn: toward totalitarianism or toward a balanced theory (...)
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  25.  6
    Tetsuro Watsuji’s Milieu and Intergenerational Environmental Ethics.Laÿna Droz - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (1):37-51.
    The concept of humans as relational individuals living in a milieu can provide some solutions to various obstacles of theorization that are standing in the way of an ethics of sustainability. The idea of a milieu was developed by Tetsuro Watsuji as a web of signification and symbols. It refers to the environment as lived by a subjective relational human being and not as artificially objectified. The milieu can neither be separated from its temporal—or historical—dimension as it is directly (...)
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  26. National Communion: Watsuji Tetsuro's Conception of Ethics, Power, and the Japanese Imperial State.Bernard Bernier - 2006 - Philosophy East and West 56 (1):84-105.
    : Watsuji Tetsurō defined ethics as being generated by a double negation: the individual's negation of the community and the self-negation of the individual who returns to the community. Thus, ethics for him is based on the individual's sacrifice for the collectivity. This position results in the conception of the community as an absolute. I contend that there is a congruence between Watsuji's conception of ethics as self-sacrifice and the way he perceived the Japanese political system. To him, the imperial (...)
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  27.  38
    The Art of Aidagara : Ethics, Aesthetics, and the Quest for an Ontology of Social Existence in Watsuji Tetsurō's Rinrigaku.James M. Shields - 2009 - Asian Philosophy 19 (3):265-283.
    This paper provides an analysis of the key term aidagara ('betweenness') in the philosophical ethics of Watsuji Tetsurō (1889-1960), in response to and in light of the recent movement in Japanese Buddhist studies known as 'Critical Buddhism'. The Critical Buddhist call for a turn away from 'topical' or intuitionist thinking and towards (properly Buddhist) 'critical' thinking, while problematic in its bipolarity, raises the important issue of the place of 'reason' vs 'intuition' in Japanese Buddhist ethics. In this paper, a comparison (...)
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  28.  16
    Concretizing an Ethics of Emptiness: The Succeeding Volumes of Watsuji Tetsurô’s Ethics.Anton Luis Sevilla - 2014 - Asian Philosophy 24 (1):82-101.
    Watsuji Tetsurô’s Ethics is one of the most important works in Japanese ethical thought. But scholarly research in English has largely focused on the first of three volumes of Ethics, leaving the latter two oft-neglected. In order to balance out the views of Watsuji’s ethics, this paper focuses on the contributions of the second and third volumes of Ethics. These volumes are essential for any concrete understanding of Watsuji’s ‘ethics of emptiness’. The second volume develops the ideas of the first, (...)
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  29.  61
    Watsuji Tetsuro, Fudo, and Climate Change.Bruce B. Janz - 2011 - Journal of Global Ethics 7 (2):173 - 184.
    In this paper, I wish to consider Watsuji Tetsuro's (1889?1960) concept of climate (fudo), and consider whether it contributes anything to the relationship between climate change and ethics. I will argue that superficially it seems that fudo tells us little about the ethics of climate change, but if considered more carefully, and through the lens of thinkers such as Deleuze and Heidegger, there is ethical insight in Watsuji's approach. Watsuji's major work in ethics, Rinrigaku, provides concepts such as between-ness (...)
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  30.  37
    Reasons for the Rubble: Watsuji Tetsuro's Position in Japan's Postwar Debate About Rationality.William R. LaFleur - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (1):1-25.
    A reassessment of Watsuji Tetsurō is undertaken by bringing his changing view of the importance of Francis Bacon to bear on his understanding of the role of "rationality" in Japanese life. This reflection will enable an exploration of the relevance of the modernity / postmodernity distinction for modern Japanese philosophy.
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  31. Time, Space, and Ethics in the Thought of Martin Heidegger, Watsuji Tetsuro, and Kuki Shuzo.Graham Mayeda - 2006 - Routledge.
    In this book, Graham Mayeda demonstrates how Watsuji Tetsuro and Kuki Shuzo, two twentieth-century Japanese philosophers, criticize and interpret Heideggerian philosophy, articulating traditional Japanese ethics in a modern idiom.
     
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  32. Time, Space, and Ethics in the Thought of Martin Heidegger, Watsuji Tetsuro, and Kuki Shuzo.Graham Mayeda - 2015 - Routledge.
    In this book, Graham Mayeda demonstrates how Watsuji Tetsuro and Kuki Shuzo, two twentieth-century Japanese philosophers, criticize and interpret Heideggerian philosophy, articulating traditional Japanese ethics in a modern idiom.
     
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  33. Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen.Steve Bein - unknown
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  34.  5
    Watsuji Tetsurō’s Concept of “Authenticity”.Kyle Michael James Shuttleworth - 2019 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 11 (3):235-250.
    ABSTRACTThe translation of honraisei as “authenticity” has caused scholars to compare Watsuji with Heideggerian and Taylorian accounts of authenticity. In this article, it will be demonstrated that this translation of “authenticity” is misleading insofar as it suggests a sense of subjective individuality as prevalent within Western philosophical thought. However, rather than rejecting a Watsujian account of authenticity, it will be argued that we can salvage this understanding by rethinking honraisei as a distinctly Japanese approach to authenticity and one which is (...)
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  35.  24
    Buddhist Emptiness in the Ethics and Aesthetics of Watsuji Tetsurō.William R. Lafleur - 1978 - Religious Studies 14 (2):237 - 250.
  36.  49
    From Community to Time–Space Development: Comparing N. S. Trubetzkoy, Nishida Kitarō, and Watsuji Tetsurō.Thorsten Botz-Bornstein - 2007 - Asian Philosophy 17 (3):263 – 282.
    I introduce and compare Russian and Japanese notions of community and space. Some characteristic strains of thought that exist in both countries had similar points of departure, overcame similar problems and arrived at similar results. In general, in Japan and Russia, the nostalgia for the community has been strong because one felt that in society through modernization something of the particularity of one's culture had been lost. As a consequence, both in Japan and in Russia allusions to the German sociologist (...)
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  37.  49
    The Social Self in Japanese Philosophy and American Pragmatism: A Comparative Study of Watsuji Tetsurō and George Herbert Mead.Steve Odin - 1992 - Philosophy East and West 42 (3):475-501.
  38.  22
    Biddhist Emptiness in the Ethics and Aesthetics of Watsuji Tetsurō*: WILLIAM R. LAFLEUR.William R. Lafleur - 1978 - Religious Studies 14 (2):237-250.
    During the past few decades a growing interest in what is often called the ‘Kyoto School’ of philosophy has evidenced itself here and there in the West, especially in discussions of comparative religious thought and in the pages of journals which are sensitive, in the post-colonial world, to the value of giving attention to contemporary thought that originates outside the Anglo-American and continental contexts. What has made the so-called Kyoto School especially interesting is the fact that those thinkers identified with (...)
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  39. Watsuji Tetsuro's Rinrigaku: Ethics in Japan.Seisaku Yamamoto & Robert E. Carter (eds.) - 1996 - State University of New York Press.
    Watsuji's Rinrigaku has been regarded as the definitive study of Japanese ethics for half a century.
     
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  40.  41
    Watsuji Tetsurō (1889-1960): Cultural Phenomenologist and Ethician.David Dilworth - 1974 - Philosophy East and West 24 (1):3-22.
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  41.  40
    The Ontological Foundation in Tetsurō Watsuji's Philosophy: Kū and Human Existence.Isamu Nagami - 1981 - Philosophy East and West 31 (3):279-296.
  42.  41
    Book Review: Tamaru Noriyoshi, Muraoka Kū, Miyata Noburu, Eds., Nihonjin No Shūkyō, Vol. 4: Kindai Nihon Shūkyōshi Shiryō. [REVIEW]Kiyomi Morioka - 1975 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 2 (2-3):217-219.
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  43.  36
    Book Review: Tamaru Noriyoshi, Muraoka Kū, Miyata Noburu, Eds., Nihonjin No Shūkyō, Vol. 2: Girei No Kōzō. [REVIEW]Keiichi Yanagawa - 1975 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 2 (2-3):211-213.
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  44.  37
    Book Review: Tamaru Noriyoshi, Muraoka Kū, Miyata Noburu, eds., Nihonjin no shūkyō, Vol. 1: Jōnen no sekai. [REVIEW]David Reid - 1975 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 2 (2-3):207-210.
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  45.  31
    Book Review: Tamaru Noriyoshi, Muraoka Kū, Miyata Noburu, eds., Nihonjin no shūkyō, Vol. 3: Kindai to no kaiko. [REVIEW]Kiyomi Morioka - 1975 - Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 2 (2-3):213-217.
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  46.  9
    The Ethics of Watsuji Tetsuro.Alistair Swale - 1996 - In Brian Carr (ed.), Morals and Society in Asian Philosophy. Curzon. pp. 1--37.
  47.  3
    The Reinterpretation of Tetsurô Watsuji’s Communitarian Thought.Donghyun Kim - 2018 - Kritike 12 (2):126-139.
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  48.  35
    Reflections on Time, Space and Ethics in the Philosophy of Nishida Kitaro and Watsuji Tetsuro.Graham Mayeda - 2000 - International Studies in Philosophy 32 (1):147-155.
  49.  6
    Pilgrimages to the Ancient Temples in Nara [Koji Junrei] by Watsuji Tetsurō.Laura Specker Sullivan - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (3):821-822.
  50. Guiding Principles of Interpretation in Watsuji Tetsurō’s History of Japanese Ethical Thought: With Particular Reference to the Tension Between the Sonnō and Bushidō Traditions.David A. Dilworth - 2008 - In Victor Sōgen Hori & Melissa Anne-Marie Curley (eds.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy: Neglected Themes and Hidden Variations. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 101-112.
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