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  1.  51
    Property-Owning Democracy: Rawls and Beyond.Martin O'Neill & Thad Williamson (eds.) - 2012 - Wiley-Blackwell.
  2. Property-Owning Democracy and the Demands of Justice.Martin O'Neill & Thad Williamson - 2009 - Living Reviews in Democracy 1:1-10.
    John Rawls is arguably the most important political philosopher of the past century. His theory of justice has set the agenda for debate in mainstream political philosophy for the past forty years, and has had an important influence in economics, law, sociology, and other disciplines. However, despite the importance and popularity of Rawls's work, there is no clear picture of what a society that met Rawls's principles of justice would actually look like. This article sets out to explore that question.
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  3.  13
    A 20-Year Strategy to Create an Egalitarian Distribution of Assets in the United States.Thad Williamson - 2012 - In T. Williamson (ed.), Property-Owning Democracy: Rawls and Beyond. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 225.
  4.  12
    Is Property‐Owning Democracy a Politically Viable Aspiration?Thad Williamson - 2012 - In T. Williamson (ed.), Property-Owning Democracy: Rawls and Beyond. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 287--306.
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  5. Property-Owning Democracy: Rawls and Beyond.Martin O'Neill & Thad Williamson (eds.) - 2012 - Wiley-Blackwell.
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  6.  4
    A Politically Viable Aspiration?Thad Williamson - 2012 - In T. Williamson (ed.), Property-Owning Democracy: Rawls and Beyond. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 287.
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  7.  17
    How to Criticise Property‐Owning Democracy: A Response to Schemmel.Thad Williamson - 2015 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (4):410-416.
    Christian Schemmel makes a strong case that John Rawls underplayed the capacity of robust ‘universal welfare states’ to realise in practice liberal egalitarian principles of justice, and that improvements upon the best existing welfare states will more plausibly take the form of movement in the direction of democratic socialism rather than the more individualist regime that Rawls called a property-owning democracy. Nonetheless, I do not believe it follows from these arguments that highly unjust, deeply flawed welfare states such as the (...)
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