13 found
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  1. Are moral judgments unified?Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Thalia Wheatley - 2014 - Philosophical Psychology 27 (4):451-474.
    Whenever psychologists, neuroscientists, or philosophers draw conclusions about moral judgments in general from a small selected sample, they assume that moral judgments are unified by some common and peculiar feature that enables generalizations and makes morality worthy of study as a unified field. We assess this assumption by considering the six main candidates for a unifying feature: content, phenomenology, force, form, function, and brain mechanisms. We conclude that moral judgment is not unified on any of these levels and that moral (...)
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  2. Is Morality Unified? Evidence that Distinct Neural Systems Underlie Moral Judgments of Harm, Dishonesty, and Disgust.Carolyn Parkinson, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Philipp E. Koralus, Angela Mendelovici, Victoria McGeer & Thalia Wheatley - 2011 - Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 23 (10):3162-3180.
    Much recent research has sought to uncover the neural basis of moral judgment. However, it has remained unclear whether "moral judgments" are sufficiently homogenous to be studied scientifically as a unified category. We tested this assumption by using fMRI to examine the neural correlates of moral judgments within three moral areas: (physical) harm, dishonesty, and (sexual) disgust. We found that the judgment ofmoral wrongness was subserved by distinct neural systems for each of the different moral areas and that these differences (...)
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  3.  77
    Readiness potentials driven by non-motoric processes.Prescott Alexander, Alexander Schlegel, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Adina L. Roskies, Thalia Wheatley & Peter Ulric Tse - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 39:38-47.
  4.  39
    Beyond Single‐Mindedness: A Figure‐Ground Reversal for the Cognitive Sciences.Mark Dingemanse, Andreas Liesenfeld, Marlou Rasenberg, Saul Albert, Felix K. Ameka, Abeba Birhane, Dimitris Bolis, Justine Cassell, Rebecca Clift, Elena Cuffari, Hanne De Jaegher, Catarina Dutilh Novaes, N. J. Enfield, Riccardo Fusaroli, Eleni Gregoromichelaki, Edwin Hutchins, Ivana Konvalinka, Damian Milton, Joanna Rączaszek-Leonardi, Vasudevi Reddy, Federico Rossano, David Schlangen, Johanna Seibtbb, Elizabeth Stokoe, Lucy Suchman, Cordula Vesper, Thalia Wheatley & Martina Wiltschko - 2023 - Cognitive Science 47 (1):e13230.
    A fundamental fact about human minds is that they are never truly alone: all minds are steeped in situated interaction. That social interaction matters is recognized by any experimentalist who seeks to exclude its influence by studying individuals in isolation. On this view, interaction complicates cognition. Here, we explore the more radical stance that interaction co-constitutes cognition: that we benefit from looking beyond single minds toward cognition as a process involving interacting minds. All around the cognitive sciences, there are approaches (...)
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  5.  71
    Hypnotizing Libet: Readiness potentials with non-conscious volition.Alexander Schlegel, Prescott Alexander, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Adina Roskies, Peter Ulric Tse & Thalia Wheatley - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 33 (C):196-203.
    The readiness potential (RP) is one of the most controversial topics in neuroscience and philosophy due to its perceived relevance to the role of conscious willing in action. Libet and colleagues reported that RP onset precedes both volitional movement and conscious awareness of willing that movement, suggesting that the experience of conscious will may not cause volitional movement (Libet, Gleason, Wright, & Pearl, 1983). Rather, they suggested that the RP indexes unconscious processes that may actually cause both volitional movement and (...)
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  6. Everyday confabulation.Thalia Wheatley - 2009 - In William Hirstein (ed.), Confabulation: Views From Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Psychology and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  7.  50
    Pupil dilation patterns reflect the contents of consciousness.Olivia Kang & Thalia Wheatley - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 35:128-135.
  8.  4
    The Moral Brain.Jean Decety & Thalia Wheatley (eds.) - 2015 - The MIT Press.
    An overview of the latest interdisciplinary research on human morality, capturing moral sensibility as a sophisticated integration of cognitive, emotional, and motivational mechanisms. Over the past decade, an explosion of empirical research in a variety of fields has allowed us to understand human moral sensibility as a sophisticated integration of cognitive, emotional, and motivational mechanisms shaped through evolution, development, and culture. Evolutionary biologists have shown that moral cognition evolved to aid cooperation; developmental psychologists have demonstrated that the elements that underpin (...)
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  9.  15
    Reason for optimism: How a shifting focus on neural population codes is moving cognitive neuroscience beyond phrenology.Carolyn Parkinson & Thalia Wheatley - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  10.  7
    Rapid dissonant grunting, or, but why does music sound the way it does?Beau R. Sievers & Thalia Wheatley - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44.
    Each target article contributes important proto-musical building blocks that constrain music as-we-know-it. However, neither the credible signaling nor social bonding accounts elucidate the central mystery of why music sounds the way it does. Getting there requires working out how proto-musical building blocks combine and interact to create the complex, rich, and affecting music humans create and enjoy.
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  11.  15
    Random isn't real: How the patchy distribution of ecological rewards may generate “incentive hope”.Laurel Symes & Thalia Wheatley - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
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  12. Sources of the Experience of Will.Daniel M. Wegner & Thalia Wheatley - unknown
    Conscious will is an experience like the sensation of the color red, the percepfion of a friend's voice, or the enjoyment of a fine spring day. David Hume (1739/1888) appreciated the will in just this way, defining it as "nothing but the internal..
     
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  13. Preface to the new edition.Thalia Wheatley - 2002 - In Daniel M. Wegner (ed.), The Illusion of Conscious Will. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press.
     
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