10 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Theodore D. George [10]Theodore Dennis George [1]
See also
Theodore George
Texas A&M University
  1. Tragedies of Spirit. Tracing Finitude in Hegel's 'Phenomenology'. [REVIEW]Theodore D. George - 2007 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 69 (3):607-607.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2.  9
    Tragedies of Spirit: Tracing Finitude in Hegel's Phenomenology.Theodore D. George - 2006 - Albany, NY, USA: State University of New York Press.
    In Tragedies of Spirit, Theodore D. George engages Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit to explore the philosophical significance of tragedy in post-Kantian continental thought. George follows lines of inquiry originally developed by Nietzsche, Heidegger, Gadamer, and Derrida, and takes as his point of departure the concern that Hegel’s speculative philosophy forms a summit of modernity that the present historical time is called to interrogate. Yet, George argues that Hegel’s larger speculative ambitions in the Phenomenology compel him to turn to the resource (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  31
    The Myth of the West Interrupted: Community and Cultural Difference in Nancy’s “Literary Communism”.Theodore D. George - 2003 - International Studies in Philosophy 35 (1):49-63.
    The author submits that while Nancy's tendency to make Occidentalist remarks cannot be denied, it is antithetical to his own conception of community that may be forged through literature. Nancy's conception actually provides a basis to critique not only Occidentalism, but any view that blinds us to the significance of cultural differences. For Nancy genuine community can only be achieved in the exposure of the other as a singular individual marked by unique cultural, historical, and existential experiences. His approach reminds (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  36
    Specifications: Hegel, Heidegger, and the Comedy of the End of Art.Theodore D. George - 2003 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (1):27-41.
    In the “Postscript” to his Origin of the Work of Art, Heidegger suggests that one important aim of his investigation into the relation between truth and art is to subject to scrutiny Hegel’s famous thesis on the end of art. The purpose of my essay is to contribute to this project by reexamining aspects of Hegel’s discussion of art in the Phenomenology of Spirit that appear to subvert his own thesis. Hegel’s treatment of ancient Greek drama and, specifically, some of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  33
    The Worklessness of Literature: Blanchot, Hegel, and the Ambiguity of the Poetic Word.Theodore D. George - 2006 - Philosophy Today 50 (Supplement):39-47.
    Although there is much scholarship on Maurice Blanchot’s relationship to his contemporaries on the French intellectual scene, substantially less has been made of his debts to the German philosophical heritage in general, and to G. W. F. Hegel in particular. In this article, the author maintains that Blanchot’s association of literature with worklessness comprises a direct, if somewhat tacit, refusal of Hegel’s determination of art as a work of spirit. The author argues that Blanchot’s critical relation to Hegel sheds new (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  32
    Passive Resistance: Giorgio Agamben and the Bequest of Early German Romanticism and Hegel.Theodore D. George - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):37-48.
    The purpose of this essay is to examine Giorgio Agamben’s important but underappreciated debts to the early German Romantics and to Hegel. While maintaining critical distance from these figures, Agamben develops crucial aspects of his approach to radical passivity with reference to them. The focus of this essay is on Agamben’s consideration of the early German Romantics’ notions of criticism and irony, Hegel’s notion of language, and the implications of this view of language for his notion of community.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  42
    Passive Resistance: Giorgio Agamben and the Bequest of German Idealism and Romanticism.Theodore D. George - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):37-48.
    The purpose of this essay is to examine Giorgio Agamben’s important but underappreciated debts to the early German Romantics and to Hegel. While maintaining critical distance from these figures, Agamben develops crucial aspects of his approach to radical passivity with reference to them. The focus of this essay is on Agamben’s consideration of the early German Romantics’ notions of criticism and irony, Hegel’s notion of language, and the implications of this view of language for his notion of community.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  36
    Nicolaus Cusanus and the Present.Theodore D. George - 2002 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (1):71-79.
  9.  38
    The Disruption of Health: Shaffer, Foucault and 'the Normal'.Theodore D. George - 1999 - Journal of Medical Humanities 20 (4):231-245.
    In this article the aurhtor explores the intimate connection between the concepts of ‘health’ and ‘normality’ in the fields of medicine and mental health by discerning Foucauldian themes in Peter Shaffer’s critically acclaimed drama Equus. Shaffer’s scrutiny of the mental health field pinpoints the same issue as Foucault does in his many works on medicine and psychiatry, namely, that operating behind any concept of ‘health’ in these fields is nothing other than the notion of ‘normality.’ By looking not only to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  18
    Specifications: Heidegger, Hegel, and the Comedy of the End of Art.Theodore D. George - 2003 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (1):27-41.
    In the “Postscript” to his Origin of the Work of Art, Heidegger suggests that one important aim of his investigation into the relation between truth and art is to subject to scrutiny Hegel’s famous thesis on the end of art. The purpose of my essay is to contribute to this project by reexamining aspects of Hegel’s discussion of art in the Phenomenology of Spirit that appear to subvert his own thesis. Hegel’s treatment of ancient Greek drama and, specifically, some of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark