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Theodore George [26]Theodore D. George [11]Theodore Dennis George [1]
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Theodore George
Texas A&M University
  1.  11
    Are We a Conversation? Hermeneutics, Exteriority, and Transmittability.Theodore George - 2017 - Research in Phenomenology 47 (3):331-350.
    Hermeneutics is widely celebrated as a call for “conversation”—that is, a manner of inquiry characterized by humility and openness to the other that eschews the pretenses of calculative rationality and resists all finality of conclusions. In this, conversation takes shape in efforts to understand and interpret that always unfold in the transmission of meaning historically in language. Yet, the celebration of hermeneutics for humility and openness appears, at least, to risk embarrassment in light of claims found in Heidegger and Gadamer (...)
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  2. Utopia of Understanding: Between Babel and Auschwitz. [REVIEW]Theodore George & Donatella Di Cesare - 2013 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2013:NA.
    The appearance in English of Donatella Ester Di Cesare's Utopia of Understanding: Between Babel and Auschwitz brings a distinctive development within the philosophical study of hermeneutics to an Anglophone readership.
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  3. Tragedies of Spirit. Tracing Finitude in Hegel's 'Phenomenology'. [REVIEW]Theodore D. George - 2007 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 69 (3):607-607.
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  4.  32
    Forgiveness, Freedom, and Human Finitude in Hegel’s The Spirit of Christianity and Its Fate.Theodore George - 2011 - International Philosophical Quarterly 51 (1):39-53.
    The purpose of this essay is to consider the significance that Hegel grants to religious love and, with it, forgiveness in his early The Spirit of Christianity and Its Fate. Although Hegel characterizes religious love in this writing as a unity that transcends reason, his association of such love with forgiveness nevertheless sheds light on an important aspect of human finitude. In this, Hegel may be seen to identify forgiveness as a form of freedom elicited by limits that we encounter (...)
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  5.  4
    What Is The Future Of The Past? Gadamer And Hegel On Truth, Art And The Ruptures Of Tradition.Theodore George - 2009 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 40 (1):4-20.
  6.  1
    Tragedies of Spirit: Tracing Finitude in Hegel's Phenomenology.Theodore D. George - 2006 - Albany, NY, USA: State University of New York Press.
    In Tragedies of Spirit, Theodore D. George engages Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit to explore the philosophical significance of tragedy in post-Kantian continental thought. George follows lines of inquiry originally developed by Nietzsche, Heidegger, Gadamer, and Derrida, and takes as his point of departure the concern that Hegel’s speculative philosophy forms a summit of modernity that the present historical time is called to interrogate. Yet, George argues that Hegel’s larger speculative ambitions in the Phenomenology compel him to turn to the resource (...)
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  7.  25
    The Myth of the West Interrupted: Community and Cultural Difference in Nancy’s “Literary Communism”.Theodore D. George - 2003 - International Studies in Philosophy 35 (1):49-63.
    The author submits that while Nancy's tendency to make Occidentalist remarks cannot be denied, it is antithetical to his own conception of community that may be forged through literature. Nancy's conception actually provides a basis to critique not only Occidentalism, but any view that blinds us to the significance of cultural differences. For Nancy genuine community can only be achieved in the exposure of the other as a singular individual marked by unique cultural, historical, and existential experiences. His approach reminds (...)
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  8. De la invisibilidad a la intimidad: Honneth, Gadamer y el reconocimiento del otro.Theodore George - 2010 - In Maria del Rosario Acosta Lopez (ed.), Idealismo alemán y hermenéutica: un retorno a las fuentes del debate contemporáneo. Bogotá, Bogota, Colombia: Universidad de los Andes, CESO. pp. 295-318.
    This article argues that the political significance Hans-Georg Gadamer's attributes to friendship not only resists the criticism of Gadamer (and Heidegger) leveled by Axel Honneth but, moreover, that Gadamer's approach to friendship sheds light on a certain intimacy we experience in our opening onto the political sphere.
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  9.  25
    Specifications: Hegel, Heidegger, and the Comedy of the End of Art.Theodore D. George - 2003 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (1):27-41.
    In the “Postscript” to his Origin of the Work of Art, Heidegger suggests that one important aim of his investigation into the relation between truth and art is to subject to scrutiny Hegel’s famous thesis on the end of art. The purpose of my essay is to contribute to this project by reexamining aspects of Hegel’s discussion of art in the Phenomenology of Spirit that appear to subvert his own thesis. Hegel’s treatment of ancient Greek drama and, specifically, some of (...)
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  10.  23
    The Worklessness of Literature: Blanchot, Hegel, and the Ambiguity of the Poetic Word.Theodore D. George - 2006 - Philosophy Today 50 (Supplement):39-47.
    Although there is much scholarship on Maurice Blanchot’s relationship to his contemporaries on the French intellectual scene, substantially less has been made of his debts to the German philosophical heritage in general, and to G. W. F. Hegel in particular. In this article, the author maintains that Blanchot’s association of literature with worklessness comprises a direct, if somewhat tacit, refusal of Hegel’s determination of art as a work of spirit. The author argues that Blanchot’s critical relation to Hegel sheds new (...)
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  11.  35
    Nicolaus Cusanus and the Present.Theodore D. George - 2002 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (1):71-79.
  12.  21
    Passive Resistance: Giorgio Agamben and the Bequest of Early German Romanticism and Hegel.Theodore D. George - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):37-48.
    The purpose of this essay is to examine Giorgio Agamben’s important but underappreciated debts to the early German Romantics and to Hegel. While maintaining critical distance from these figures, Agamben develops crucial aspects of his approach to radical passivity with reference to them. The focus of this essay is on Agamben’s consideration of the early German Romantics’ notions of criticism and irony, Hegel’s notion of language, and the implications of this view of language for his notion of community.
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  13.  31
    Thing, Object, Life.Theodore George - 2012 - Research in Phenomenology 42 (1):18-34.
    Abstract The broad concern of this article is to contribute to discussions within hermeneutical philosophy that address the question of life as a form of correlation. More specifically, its purpose is to shed light on the character of life as correlation with reference to a basic aspect of this correlation: our living relation to things. To this end, the author focuses, first, on the later Heidegger's suggestion that our proper relation to things takes shape as an enactment guided by the (...)
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  14.  41
    Community in the Idiom of Crisis: Hegel on Political Life, Tragedy, and the Dead.Theodore George - 2002 - Research in Phenomenology 32 (1):123-138.
    One of the most pressing issues for contemporary continental philosophy turns on the determination of a concept of community that twists free from the dangerous tendency in the canon of Western thought to associate the perfection of political affiliation with complete unity, even totality and immanence. In this article the author suggests that in the Phenomenology of Spirit Hegel provides important resources for this project—not, of course, in his conception of that community indicated by the absolute spirit, itself a preeminent (...)
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  15.  28
    Passive Resistance: Giorgio Agamben and the Bequest of German Idealism and Romanticism.Theodore D. George - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):37-48.
    The purpose of this essay is to examine Giorgio Agamben’s important but underappreciated debts to the early German Romantics and to Hegel. While maintaining critical distance from these figures, Agamben develops crucial aspects of his approach to radical passivity with reference to them. The focus of this essay is on Agamben’s consideration of the early German Romantics’ notions of criticism and irony, Hegel’s notion of language, and the implications of this view of language for his notion of community.
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  16.  25
    The Disruption of Health: Shaffer, Foucault and 'the Normal'.Theodore D. George - 1999 - Journal of Medical Humanities 20 (4):231-245.
    In this article the aurhtor explores the intimate connection between the concepts of ‘health’ and ‘normality’ in the fields of medicine and mental health by discerning Foucauldian themes in Peter Shaffer’s critically acclaimed drama Equus. Shaffer’s scrutiny of the mental health field pinpoints the same issue as Foucault does in his many works on medicine and psychiatry, namely, that operating behind any concept of ‘health’ in these fields is nothing other than the notion of ‘normality.’ By looking not only to (...)
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  17.  20
    From the Life of a People to the Death of Others: On Jean-Luc Nancy’s Unworking of Heidegger’s Politics.Theodore George - 2008 - International Studies in Philosophy 40 (1):65-77.
    Jean-Luc Nancy’s conception of the ‘inoperative community’ is one of the most original attempts in recent memory to develop a theory of the political that addresses contemporary concerns for difference and singularity. In this paper, I will argue that despite the deep rapprochement between Nancy and Heidegger, Nancy’s insistence upon the connection between community and singularity allows him to twist free from the more duplicitous features of his Heideggerian heritage. In contrast with Heidegger, Nancy interprets the political significance of finitude (...)
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  18.  28
    Günter Figal's hermeneutics.Theodore George - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (6):904-912.
    This article offers a survey of some main ideas in Günter Figal's hermeneutics as he presents them in his recent Gegenständlichkeit: Das Hermeneutische und die Philosophie [ Objectivity: The Hermeneutical and Philosophy ]. Figal promises a new approach to the philosophical study of hermeneutics in this work that would advance beyond Gadamer, Heidegger, and others in significant respects. His project opens out from the belief that hermeneutical experience is guided by exteriority; such experience is directed toward and sustained by what (...)
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  19.  23
    Martin Heidegger: Key Concepts, Edited by Bret W. Davis, Acumen Publishing, 2010. 306 Pp., Pb. £14.99/$24.95. ISBN-13: 9781844651993. [REVIEW]Theodore George - 2010 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 2 (2):291-300.
    Although it might go without mention, editor Bret Davis nevertheless reminds us on the first page of his introduction to Key Concepts that “Martin Heidegger (1889–1976) is widely considered to be the most famous, influential, and controversial philosopher of the twentieth century.” This really fine new companion put together by Davis promises to elucidate the main lines of Heidegger’s thought at a moment when Heidegger is perhaps receiving more scholarly attention and, indeed, more diverse scholarly attention, than at any previous (...)
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  20.  11
    Specifications: Heidegger, Hegel, and the Comedy of the End of Art.Theodore D. George - 2003 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (1):27-41.
    In the “Postscript” to his Origin of the Work of Art, Heidegger suggests that one important aim of his investigation into the relation between truth and art is to subject to scrutiny Hegel’s famous thesis on the end of art. The purpose of my essay is to contribute to this project by reexamining aspects of Hegel’s discussion of art in the Phenomenology of Spirit that appear to subvert his own thesis. Hegel’s treatment of ancient Greek drama and, specifically, some of (...)
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  21.  10
    Letter From the Editor. [REVIEW]Theodore George - 2014 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (1):5-6.
  22.  11
    Remarks on James Risser's "The Life of Understanding: A Contemporary Hermeneutics".Theodore George - 2014 - Philosophy Today 58 (1):107-116.
    The purpose of this piece is to examine the contribution made to the philosophical study of hermeneutics by James Risser’s recently published book, The Life of Understanding: A Contemporary Hermeneutics. The author argues that Risser’s emphasis on the relation of understanding to factical life places him among contemporaries, such as Donatella di Cesare and Günter Figal, who seek to advance hermeneutics beyond the context of Hans-Georg Gadamer’s approach. The author argues that Risser’s hermeneutics is distinguished by his concern for the (...)
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  23.  8
    Introduction.Theodore George - 2014 - Research in Phenomenology 44 (1):107-110.
    The essays that follow concern one of these contributions, Günter Figal’s Objectivity: The Hermeneutical and Philosophy (SUNY Press, 2010; English translation of Gegenständlichkeit: das Hermeneutische und die Philosophie, Mohr Siebeck 2006). These pieces are drawn from an “Author Meets Critics” session sponsored by the North American Society for Philosophical Hermeneutics (NASPH) in conjunction with the 2012 meeting of SPEP. As conceived by the NASPH organizers, the principal purpose of the “Author Meets Critics” session was to further discussion of the significance (...)
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  24.  2
    In a World Fraught and Tender.Theodore George - 2017 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (1):39-52.
    In this essay, the author argues that Dennis Schmidt’s considerations of ethical life, when taken together, comprise a prescient and distinctive response to Heidegger’s call to pursue an ‘original ethics.’ In this, Schmidt disavows discourses within the discipline of ethics that seek to establish an ethical theory or position, arguing instead that the demands of ethical life require us to focus on the incalculable singularity of the factical situations in which we find ourselves. The author suggests that Schmidt’s contributions to (...)
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  25. What is the Future of the Past? Gadamer and Hegel on the Work of Art in the Age of its Liberation.Theodore George - 2009 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 40 (1):4-20.
    Some more recent scholarship that challenges received wisdom about Gadamer not withstanding, it remains common to associate his hermeneutical approach to art and literature, along with his hermeneutics generally, with political and cultural conservatism. In this essay, however, the author argues that some of Gadamer’s significant, but underappreciated, later essays on Hegel’s aesthetics further support and nuance the rising recognition of Gadamer’s sensitivity to the discontinuities, dislocations, and fractures that pervade any experience of the past. Specifically, Gadamer’s critical response in (...)
     
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  26.  5
    Letter From the Editor. [REVIEW]Theodore George - 2015 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):5-5.
  27.  2
    Letter From the Editor. [REVIEW]Theodore George - 2015 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (1):5-5.
  28. Art as Testimony of Tradition and as Testimony of Order.Theodore George - 2017 - Internationales Jahrbuch für Hermeneutik 16 (1):107-120.
    Some critics charge that Gadamer’s approach to our experience of art remains mired in conservatism because he believes our experience of artworks depends on tradition. In this essay, I argue that this charge fails to address the full scope of Gadamer’s considerations of our experience of art. This becomes clear with an emendation that Gadamer appears to make to his Truth and Method account of artistic imitation, or, mimesis, in his later essay “Art and Imitation.” Whereas Gadamer’s approach to mimesis (...)
     
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  29. A Monstrous Absolute: Kant, Schelling, and the Poetic Turn in Philosophy.Theodore George - 2004 - In Jason Wirth (ed.), Schelling Now. State University of New York Press. pp. 135-146.
    In this essay, the author contends that Schelling’s first publication, the Philosophical Letters on Dogmatism and Criticism, provides crucial insights into the wide spread philosophical interest in poetic art today. For Schelling, philosophical inquiry finds that its native resource, reason, requires the disclosive power of the poetic genera of tragic drama in order to remedy a crisis which inheres in its very nature and operations.
     
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  30. From Work to Play: Gadamer on the Affinity of Art, Truth, and Beauty.Theodore George - 2011 - Internationales Jahrbuch für Hermeneutik 10:107-122.
    In this essay, the author maintains that Gadamer’s affirmation of the relation among art, truth, and beauty is less a sign of conservatism or nostalgia than it is a key to his innovative and insightful examination of our experience of art. Gadamer’s approach to both the truth claim and the beauty of art flows from his association of the being of art with enactment (Vollzug). Yet, increasingly over the course of his writings, Gadamer appears to relinquishes talk of art in (...)
     
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  31. Grieving as Limit Situation of Memory: Gadamer, Beamer, and Moules on the Infinite Task Posed by the Dead.Theodore George - 2017 - Journal of Applied Hermeneutics 2017 (1).
    In this paper, the author turns to Hans-Georg Gadamer’s philosophical hermeneutics to examine the experience of grieving. Specifically, the author argues that grieving may be grasped as a limit situation of memory. This approach suggests that grieving cannot be adequately captured by a stage model theory but, instead, poses an infinite task that is fraught with difficulty and ethical demands. The author develops this approach in reference not only to Hans-Georg Gadamer but recent research by Nancy Moules and Kate Beamer.
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  32. Hermeneutics and German Idealism.Theodore George - 2016 - In Niall Keane & Chris Lawn (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Hermeneutics. Malden, MA, USA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 54-62.
    This chapter focuses on Gadamer's debts to figures and themes in German idealism, focusing in particular on Kant and Hegel.
     
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  33. Objectivity and Finite Transcendence: A Brief Overview of Günter Figal's New Direction in Hermeneutics.Theodore George - 2010 - In Objectivity: The Hermeneutical and Philosophy. Albany, NY, USA:
    Translator's Introduction to Günter Figal's Objectivity: The Hermeneutical and Philosophy.
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  34. Objectivity and the Openness of Language: On Figal's Recent Contribution to the Debate Between Hermeneutics and Deconstruction.Theodore George - 2011 - In Friederike Rese, Michael Steinmann & David Espinet (eds.), Objektivität und Gegenstaendlichkeit. Tübingen, Germany: Mohr Siebeck. pp. 218-234.
    The author argues that Günter Figal sheds novel light on language in his recent Objectivity: The Hermeneutical and Philosophy through a debate he appears to stage with the position Jacques Derrida develops in some of his early essays on deconstruction. Figal describes language as a form of showing and emphasizes the openness and flexibility of expression involved in determining significance. Yet, he rejects the idea he finds in Derrida that such flexibility should lead us to wholesale suspicion of the capacity (...)
     
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  35. Objectivity: The Hermeneutical and Philosophy.Theodore D. George (ed.) - 2010 - State University of New York Press.
    _Appearing for the first time in English, Günter Figal’s groundbreaking book in the tradition of philosophical hermeneutics offers original perspectives on perennial philosophical problems._.
     
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  36. The Promise of World Literature.Theodore George - 2014 - Internationales Jahrbuch für Hermeneutik 13 (1):128-143.
    In this essay, the author argues that Gadamer's approach to world literature contributes to the call for us mutually to discover our solidarities with those from different traditions, and, thus also, different linguistic traditions. He holds that the discovery of global solidarities is urgent because current prospects to address the world's political, social and economic challenges have been put in jeopardy by the increasingly ubiquitous use of calculative rationality to manage human relations. Gadamer's concern for us to discover solidarities, however, (...)
     
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  37. The Responsibility to Understand.Theodore George - 2014 - In Gert-Jan van der Heiden (ed.), Phenomenological Perspectives on Plurality. Leiden, Netherlands: Brill. pp. 103-120.
    The concern of the present inquiry is whether, and, if so, how, Hans-Georg Gadamer’s conception of hermeneutical understanding can help us grasp the character of our ethical responsibility, and, indeed, a sense of responsibility that remains answerable to the plurality of our always singular and contingent ethical experiences. The focus of this essay, however, is to shed novel light on the responsibility at stake in understanding—or, as this may be referred to more simply, the responsibility to understand—on the motif of (...)
     
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