Results for 'Theodore M. Ludwig'

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  1.  79
    Book reviews. [REVIEW]Pradip Bhattacharya, Edward T. Ulrich, Joseph A. Bracken, Richard Weiss, Christopher Key Chapple, Michael C. Brannigan, Theodore M. Ludwig, S. Nagarajan, Michael H. Fisher, Steve Derné, Herman Tull, Jarrod W. Brown, Joanna Kirkpatrick, Edward T. Ulrich, Carl Olson & Deepak Sarma - 2004 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 8 (1-3):203-227.
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  2.  46
    How do we know who we are?: a biography of the self.Arnold M. Ludwig - 1997 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    "The terrain of the self is vast," notes renowned psychiatrist Arnold Ludwig, "parts known, parts impenetrable, and parts unexplored." How do we construct a sense of ourselves? How can a self reflect upon itself or deceive itself? Is all personal identity plagiarized? Is a "true" or "authentic" self even possible? Is it possible to really "know" someone else or ourselves for that matter? To answer these and many other intriguing questions, Ludwig takes a unique approach, examining the art (...)
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  3.  12
    A Chapter of Franciscan History by Sister M. Mileta Ludwig.Theodore Roemer - 1951 - Franciscan Studies 11 (1):109-110.
  4.  56
    The Tyranny of Generosity: Why Philanthropy Corrupts Our Politics and How We Can Fix It.Theodore M. Lechterman - 2022 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The practice of philanthropy, which releases private property for public purposes, represents in many ways the best angels of our nature. But this practice's noteworthy virtues often obscure the fact that philanthropy also represents the exercise of private power. In The Tyranny of Generosity, Theodore Lechterman shows how this private power can threaten the foundations of a democratic society. The deployment of private wealth for public ends may rival the authority of communities to determine their own affairs. And, in (...)
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  5.  14
    Trust in numbers: the pursuit of objectivity in science and public life.Theodore M. Porter - 1995 - Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.
    What accounts for the prestige of quantitative methods? The usual answer is that quantification is desirable in social investigation as a result of its successes in science. Trust in Numbers questions whether such success in the study of stars, molecules, or cells should be an attractive model for research on human societies, and examines why the natural sciences are highly quantitative in the first place. Theodore Porter argues that a better understanding of the attractions of quantification in business, government, (...)
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  6.  18
    Social Enterprises as Agents of Social Justice: A Rawlsian Perspective on Institutional Capacity.Theodore M. Lechterman & Johanna Mair - forthcoming - Organization Studies.
    Many scholars of organizations see social enterprise as a promising approach to advancing social justice but neglect to scrutinize the normative foundations and limitations of this optimism. This article draws on Rawlsian political philosophy to investigate whether and how social enterprises can support social justice. We propose that this perspective assigns organizations a duty to foster institutional capacity, a concept we define and elaborate. We investigate how this duty might apply specifically to social enterprises, given their characteristic features. We theorize (...)
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  7.  6
    How Science Became Technical.Theodore M. Porter - 2009 - Isis 100 (2):292-309.
    Not until the twentieth century did science come to be regarded as fundamentally technical in nature. A technical field, after all, meant not just a difficult one, but one relying on concepts and vocabulary that matter only to specialists. The alternative, to identify science with an ideal of public reason, attained its peak of influence in the late nineteenth century. While the scale and applicability of science advanced enormously after 1900, scientists have more and more preferred the detached objectivity of (...)
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  8. The Argument from Non-belief: THEODORE M. DRANGE.Theodore M. Drange - 1993 - Religious Studies 29 (4):417-432.
    Attempts have been made to prove God's non-existence. Often this takes the form of an appeal to the so-called Argument from Evil: if God were to exist, then he would not permit as much suffering in the world as there actually is. Hence the fact that there is so much suffering constitutes evidence for God's non-existence. In this essay I propose a variation which I shall call ‘The Argument from Non-belief’. Its basic idea is that if God were to exist, (...)
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  9.  42
    Conceptual Problems Confronting a Totally Disembodied Afterlife.Theodore M. Drange - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 329-333.
    This paper presents and defends an argument for the conclusion that a personal afterlife in the absence of any sort of body at all is not conceptually possible. The main idea behind the argument is that there would be no way for the identities of people in a bodiless state to be established, either by others or by themselves. The argument raises a significant challenge to explaining just how someone in a totally disembodied afterlife could ever be identified—a challenge that (...)
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  10.  14
    Modern Religion, Modern Race.Theodore M. Vial - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Religion is a racialized category, even when race is not explicitly mentioned. In Modern Religion, Modern Race Theodore Vial argues that because the categories of religion and race are rooted in the post-Enlightenment project of reimagining what it means to be human, we cannot simply will ourselves to stop using them. Only by acknowledging that religion is already racialized can we begin to understand how the two concepts are intertwined and how they operate in our modern world.It has become (...)
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  11.  16
    Modest Judicial Restraint.Theodore M. Benditt - 1999 - Law and Philosophy 18 (3):243-270.
    "The main argument of this paper is that there are reasons for judges not only to evaluate the substantive merit of legislation, but to advert to the fact that the place of elected legislatures in our scheme of government gives legislation a standing, an entitlement to consideration, that may go beyond judicial estimates of its intrinsic merit." [Is this just a statement of procedural legitimacy?] "To answer the question [of who assigns rights], courts must take a view as to the (...)
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  12. Atheism, agnosticism, noncognitivism (1998).Theodore M. Drange - manuscript
    This online essay puts forth and defends precise definitions of the terms "atheism," "agnosticism." and "[theological] noncognitivism.".
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  13. Science and miracles (1998).Theodore M. Drange - manuscript
    This online essay explores how the term "miracle" is best defined and whether it is possible for scientists, as scientists, to believe in miracles.
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  14. On defending atheism (2005).Theodore M. Drange - manuscript
    This essay addresses the definition of "atheism" and what it means to "defend atheism." It also shows why defending atheism is preferable to defending the separation of church and state.
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  15. Why be moral? (1998).Theodore M. Drange - manuscript
    It is shown how the title question ("Why Be Moral?") can be interpreted in six different ways. Each of the six ways is analyzed and discussed, and, for each of them, an answer to the question is proposed and defended.
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  16. #StopHateForProfit and the Ethics of Boycotting by Corporations.Theodore M. Lechterman, Ryan Jenkins & Bradley J. Strawser - 2023 - Journal of Business Ethics 191 (1):77-91.
    In July 2020, more than 1000 companies that advertise on social media platforms withdrew their business, citing failures of the platforms (especially Facebook) to address the proliferation of harmful content. The #StopHateForProfit movement invites reflection on an understudied topic: the ethics of boycotting by corporations. Under what conditions is corporate boycotting permissible, required, supererogatory, or forbidden? Although value-driven consumerism has generated significant recent discussion in applied ethics, that discussion has focused almost exclusively on the consumption choices of individuals. As this (...)
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  17. An approach to the study of communicative acts.Theodore M. Newcomb - 1953 - Psychological Review 60 (6):393-404.
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  18.  50
    Can creationism be scientific? (1998).Theodore M. Drange - unknown
    My answer to the title question is a qualified "Yes." A certain rare form of creationism is in principle testable and compatible with natural law, and therefore scientific, however, this is a moot point. I arrive at my conclusions purely through thought experiments. But before getting to that, let us first consider the issues of what creationism is and what it means for a theory to be scientific.
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  19.  63
    The Argument from the Bible (1996).Theodore M. Drange - manuscript
    Almost all evangelical Christians believe that the writing of the Bible was divinely inspired and represents God's main revelation to humanity. They also believe that the Bible contains special features which constitute evidence of its divine inspiration. This would be a use of the Bible to prove God's existence within natural theology rather than within revealed theology, since the book's features are supposed to be evident even to (open-minded) skeptics. Furthermore, since a divinely inspired work must be true, those features (...)
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  20. The fine tuning argument (1998).Theodore M. Drange - unknown
    Let us consider that version of the Argument from Design which appeals to the so called "fine tuning" of the physical constants of the universe. Call it "the Fine tuning Argument." It has many advocates, both on the Internet and in print. For some of the Internet articles, see the following web site: http://www.reasons.org/resources/papers/>. One of the argument's "print" advocates is George Schlesinger, who says the following: In the last few decades a tantalizingly great number of exceedingly rare coincidences, vital (...)
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  21.  31
    The Pluralizability Objection to a New-Body Afterlife.Theodore M. Drange - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 405-408.
    This paper presents and defends that an afterlife in which a person receives a new body after his or her old body is destroyed (as it is on some notions of bodily resurrection) is conceptually impossible. The main idea behind this argument is that such an afterlife would conceptually require that a person be a kind of thing that could be rendered plural. But since persons are not that type of thing, such an afterlife is not conceptually possible.
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  22. The Cambridge history of science: The modern social sciences.Theodore M. Porter & Dorothy Ross - 2003 - History of Science 7.
    Forty-two essays by authors from five continents and many disciplines provide a synthetic account of the history of the social sciences-including behavioral and economic sciences since the late eighteenth century. The authors emphasize the cultural and intellectual preconditions of social science, and its contested but important role in the history of the modern world. While there are many historical books on particular disciplines, there are very few about the social sciences generally, and none that deal with so much of the (...)
     
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  23.  96
    Making Things Quantitative.Theodore M. Porter - 1994 - Science in Context 7 (3):389-407.
    The ArgumentQuantification is not merely a strategy for describing the social and natural worlds, but a means of reconfiguring them. It entails the imposition of new meanings and the disappearance of old ones. Often it is allied to systems of experimental or administrative control, and in fact considerable feats of human organization are generally required even to create stable, reasonably standardized measures. This essay urges that the uses of quantification in science, social science, and bureaucratic social and economic policy are (...)
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  24. Reforming vision : the engineer Le Play learns to observe society sagely.Theodore M. Porter - 2011 - In Lorraine Daston & Elizabeth Lunbeck (eds.), Histories of Scientific Observation. University of Chicago Press.
     
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  25. Law as rule and principle: problems of legal philosophy.Theodore M. Benditt - 1978 - Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press.
  26. The Perfect Politician.Theodore M. Lechterman - 2024 - In David Edmonds (ed.), AI Morality. Oxford: Oxford University Press USA.
    Ideas for integrating AI into politics are now emerging and advancing at accelerating pace. This chapter highlights a few different varieties and show how they reflect different assumptions about the value of democracy. We cannot make informed decisions about which, if any, proposals to pursue without further reflection on what makes democracy valuable and how current conditions fail to fully realize it. Recent advances in political philosophy provide some guidance but leave important questions open. If AI advances to a state (...)
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  27.  30
    Normality, Disease, and Enhancement.Theodore M. Benditt - 2007 - In Harold Kincaid & Jennifer McKitrick (eds.), Establishing medical reality: Methodological and metaphysical issues in philosophy of medicine. Springer. pp. 13-21.
    The vagueness or imprecision of ‘the normal’ allows it to be exploited for various purposes and political ends. It is conspicuous in both medicine and athletics; I am going to try to say something about the normal in each of these areas. In medicine the idea of the normal is often deployed in understanding what constitutes disease and hence, as some see it, in determining the role of physicians, in determining what is or ought to be covered by insurance, and (...)
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  28.  43
    From mechanism to vitalism in eighteenth-century English physiology.Theodore M. Brown - 1974 - Journal of the History of Biology 7 (2):179-216.
  29. “That the Earth Belongs in Usufruct to the Living": Intergenerational Philanthropy and the Problem of Dead-Hand Control.Theodore M. Lechterman - 2023 - In Ray Madoff & Benjamin Soskis (eds.), Giving in Time: Temporal Considerations in Philanthropy. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 93-116.
    Intergenerational transfers are a core feature of the practice of private philanthropy. A substantial portion of the resources committed to charitable causes comes from transfers (either during life or at death) that continue to pay out after death. Indeed, much of the power of the charitable foundation lies in its ability to extend the life of an enterprise beyond the mortal existence of its initiating agents. Despite their prevalence, whether and in what way the instruments of intergenerational philanthropy can be (...)
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  30.  89
    Why respect matters.Theodore M. Benditt - 2008 - Journal of Value Inquiry 42 (4):487-496.
  31.  30
    The promotion of mining and the advancement of science: the chemical revolution of mineralogy.Theodore M. Porter - 1981 - Annals of Science 38 (5):543-570.
    This paper explores the origins of the analytical definition of simple substance, a concept whose central importance in the new chemistry of Lavoisier and his colleagues is now widely recognized. I argue that this notion derived from the practical activities of metallurgists and mineral assayers, and that the theoretical elaboration necessary for the analytical concept to be understood as relevant to chemistry was inspired by the efforts of enlightened rulers in Sweden and Germany to turn chemical science to the benefit (...)
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  32. The Divine Activity: An Approach to International Theology.Theodore M. Snider - 1990
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  33. The public interest.Theodore M. Benditt - 1973 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 2 (3):291-311.
  34.  24
    On the Virtues and Disadvantage of Quantification for Democratic Life.Theodore M. Porter - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (4):739-747.
    In this paper, a response to Ed Levy's discussion of medical quantification, I reflect on the ambitions of my book Trust in Numbers. I explore the idealized method of randomized clinical trials, revealed in his case study, as a social technology, one endowed with a persuasive scientific rationale but shaped also by political and social demands. The scholarly study of quantification requires not a choice between blind admiration and sweeping rejection, but a nuanced understanding. This should take into account not (...)
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  35.  83
    The Argument from Non-Belief.Theodore M. Drange - 1993 - Religious Studies 29 (4):417 - 432.
  36.  8
    Statistics and the politics of objectivity.Theodore M. Porter - 1993 - Revue de Synthèse 114 (1):87-101.
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  37. Happiness and Satisfaction - A Rejoinder to Carson.Theodore M. Benditt - 1978 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 59 (1):108.
     
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  38.  19
    Introduction: Historicizing the two cultures.Theodore M. Porter - 2005 - History of Science 43 (2):109-114.
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  39.  52
    Acting in concert or going it alone: Game theory and the law.Theodore M. Benditt - 2004 - Law and Philosophy 23 (6):615 - 630.
    In recent years a number of writers have maintained that law can usefully be illuminated by game theory. Some believe that game theory can provide guidance in formulating rules for dealing with specific problems. Others advance the philosophically ambitious contention that we can gain a better understanding and/or appreciation of law by seeing it in terms of game-theoretic ideas. My purpose in this article is to examine some claims of the latter sort, and in particular to ask how distant law (...)
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  40.  70
    Fanny's Moral Limits.Theodore M. Benditt - unknown
    Ever since the publication of Mansfield Park readers and critics have debated how to understand the novel and particularly its heroine Fanny Price. Some have disliked Fanny, have thought of her as prudish and priggish, and perhaps have preferred Mary Crawford and wished for a different ending to the story. Others have defended Fanny’s virtue, her judgment, and her mind, regarding them as quite superior to the virtue, judgment, and minds of all of the other women in the novel, and (...)
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  41. Law as Rule and Principle: Problems of Legal Philosophy.Theodore M. Benditt - 1981 - Mind 90 (357):153-154.
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  42.  5
    Rights.Theodore M. Benditt - 1982 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    To find more information about Rowman and Littlefield titles, please visit www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
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  43.  23
    Public Health and the Medical Profession in the RenaissanceCarlo M. Cipolla.Theodore M. Brown - 1977 - Isis 68 (3):479-480.
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  44. Speaking precision to power: The modern political role of social science.Theodore M. Porter - 2006 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 73 (4):1273-1294.
     
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  45.  9
    Is the Life of the Scientist a Scientific Unit?Theodore M. Porter - 2006 - Isis 97 (2):314-321.
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  46.  29
    Deterritorializing Programming Systems: For a Nomadology of Forth.Theodore M. Norton - 1998 - Symploke 6 (1):109-117.
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  47.  24
    The History of Statistics: The Measurement of Uncertainty before 1900. Stephen M. Stigler.Theodore M. Porter - 1988 - Isis 79 (2):326-327.
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  48. Incompatible-Properties Arguments.Theodore M. Drange - 1998 - Philo 1 (2):49-60.
    Ten arguments for the nonexistence of God are formulated and discussed briefly. Each of them ascribes to God a pair of properties from the following list of divine attributes: (a) perfect, (b) immutable, (c) transcendent, (d) nonphysical, (e) omniscient, (f) omnipresent, (g) personal, (h) free, (i) all-loving, (j) all-just, (k) all-merciful, and (1) the creator of the universe. Each argument aims to demonstrate an incompatibility between the two properties ascribed. The pairs considered are: 1. (a-1), 2. (b-1), 3. (b-e), 4. (...)
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  49.  22
    Disease and Discovery: A History of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, 1916-1939. Elizabeth Fee.Theodore M. Brown - 1987 - Isis 78 (4):598-600.
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  50.  42
    13: George Engel and Rochester's Biopsychosocial Tradition: Historical and Developmental Perspectives.Theodore M. Brown - 2003 - In Richard M. Frankel, Timothy E. Quill & Susan H. McDaniel (eds.), The Biopsychosocial Approach: Past, Present, and Future. University of Rochester Press. pp. 199.
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