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Thomas Clément Mercier
Charles University, Prague
  1.  26
    The Truth That Hurts, or the Corps À Corps of Tongues: An Interview with Jacques Derrida.Thomas Clément Mercier, Jacques Derrida & Évelyne Grossman - 2019 - Parallax 25 (1):8-24.
    In this 2004 interview — translated into English and published in its entirety for the first time — Jacques Derrida reflects upon his practices of writing and teaching, about the community of his readers, and explores questions related to corporeity and textuality, sexual difference, desire, politics, Marxism, violence, truth, interpretation, and translation. In the course of the interview, Derrida discusses the work of Martin Heidegger, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Maurice Blanchot, Hélène Cixous, Jean Genet, Paul Celan, and many others.
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    Silence, in the Archives: Derrida’s Other Marx.Thomas Clément Mercier - 2020 - Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 13 (2):31-46.
    The idea that Derrida kept silent on Marx before the publication of Spectres de Marx, in 1993, has become a commonplace in Derrida studies and in the history of Marxism and French 20th century political thought. This idea has often been accompanied by a certain representation of the relationship between deconstruction and dialectical materialism, and fed the legend of deconstruction’s «apoliticism» – at least before what some have called Derrida’s «ethicopolitical turn», usually dated in the early 1990s. Against this narrative, (...)
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    Tele-Mournings: Actuvirtual Events and Shared Responsibilities.Thomas Clément Mercier - 2020 - Derrida Today 13 (2):189-197.
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    We Have Tasted the Powers of the Age to Come: Thinking the Force of the Event—From Dynamis to Puissance.Thomas Clément Mercier - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (1):76-94.
    Responding to the provocative phrase ‘The Age of Grammatology’, I propose to question the notion of ‘age’, and to interrogate the powers or forces, the dynameis or dynasties attached to the interpretative model of historical periodisation. How may we think the undeniable actuality of the event beyond the sempiternal history of ages, and beyond the traditional, onto-teleological chain of power, possibility, force or dynamis that undergirds such history?
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