Results for 'Thomas E. Oldenski'

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  1.  36
    Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW]Jayne R. Beilke, Thomas J. Fiala, Kathy Hytten, Jeffrey Ayala Milligan, Thomas E. Oldenski, Michael Vavrus, Richard A. Brosio, Mary Bushnell, John F. Gallagher & Terry A. Osborn - 1997 - Educational Studies 28 (1):15-55.
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  2.  5
    The image of the unseen God: Catholicity, science, and our evolving understanding of God.Thomas E. Hosinski - 2017 - Maryknoll, New York: Orbis Books.
    The Image of the Unseen God develops a novel understanding of God and God's action compatible with the teachings of Jesus, the Christian tradition, and contemporary science.
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  3.  10
    Wordy Pictures: Theorizing the Relationship Between Image and Text in Comics.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2012-01-27 - In Aaron Meskin & Roy T. Cook (eds.), The Art of Comics. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 85–104.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Illustrated Books: A First Step The Image‐Text Complex in Comics The Image The Text How Comics Work An Objection Conclusion Notes References.
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  4.  3
    Epistemology and the predicates of education: building upon a process theory of learning.Thomas E. Peterson - 2020 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    Exploring the predicates of education from theoretical, practical and historical perspectives, this book revalorizes the central role of the humanities in the ethical and aesthetic formation of the individual.
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  5.  8
    First principles: what America's founders learned from the Greeks and Romans and how that shaped our country.Thomas E. Ricks - 2020 - New York, NY: Harper, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.
    Examines how the educations of America's first four presidents, and in particular their scholarly devotion to ancient Greek and Roman classics, informed the beliefs and ideals that shaped the nation's constitution and government.
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  6.  9
    Thinking through stories: children, philosophy, and picture books.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2022 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    This book provides justification and instruction for exploring philosophy with children, especially by using picture books to initiate philosophical discussion. By demonstrating to pre-service teachers that picture books often embed philosophical issues into their narratives, and that this makes picture books a natural place to go to help young children investigate philosophical issues, the author offers a straightforward approach to engaging young students. In particular, this volume highlights how philosophical dialogue enhances children's sense of self, provides a safe space for (...)
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  7. The Forms of Power.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 1988 - Analyse & Kritik 10 (1):3-31.
    The question of how to define the concept of social power has been a focus of controversy among social theorists. In this paper, I put forward a definition of social power that avoids many of the pitfalls of previous attempts at such a definition. Roughly, I define the power which one agent has over another as the ability that the dominant agent has to control the situation within which the subservient agent acts. Using this basic definition of power, I go (...)
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  8.  16
    Thoughtful images: illustrating philosophy through art.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2023 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    Thoughtful Images: Philosophy Illustrated is the first systematic investigation of how artists throughout the ages have illustrated philosophical texts, ideas, concepts, and theories. The book begins by developing a theory of visual illustrations of philosophical texts and undermining what the author calls "the denigration of illustration." The book then takes a more historical approach, beginning in Ancient Greece and Rome and proceeding through Medieval illuminations and printed broadsides to the frontispieces of philosophical texts. Throughout, attention is paid to how technological (...)
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  9. Dignity and practical reason in Kant's moral theory.Thomas E. Hill - 1992 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  10. Autonomy and self-respect.Thomas E. Hill - 1991 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This stimulating collection of essays in ethics eschews the simple exposition and refinement of abstract theories. Rather, the author focuses on everyday moral issues, often neglected by philosophers, and explores the deeper theoretical questions which they raise. Such issues are: Is it wrong to tell a lie to protect someone from a painful truth? Should one commit a lesser evil to prevent another from doing something worse? Can one be both autonomous and compassionate? Other topics discussed are servility, weakness of (...)
  11. Servility and self-respect.Thomas E. Hill - 1973 - The Monist 57 (1):87 - 104.
    Thomas E. Hill, Jr.; Servility and Self-Respect, The Monist, Volume 57, Issue 1, 1 January 1973, Pages 87–104, https://doi.org/10.5840/monist197357135.
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  12. Dignity and Practical Reason in Kant's Moral Theory.Thomas E. Hill - 1992 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  13. Respect, pluralism, and justice: Kantian perspectives.Thomas E. Hill - 1995 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Respect, Pluralism, and Justice is a series of essays which sketches a broadly Kantian framework for moral deliberation, and then uses it to address important social and political issues. Hill shows how Kantian theory can be developed to deal with questions about cultural diversity, punishment, political violence, responsibility for the consequences of wrongdoing, and state coercion in a pluralistic society.
  14.  51
    The Practice of Moral Judgment.Thomas E. Hill - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):47.
  15. Human welfare and moral worth: Kantian perspectives.Thomas E. Hill - 2002 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Thomas Hill, a leading figure in the recent development of Kantian moral philosophy, presents a set of essays exploring the implications of basic Kantian ideas for practical issues. The first part of the book provides background in central themes in Kant's ethics; the second part discusses questions regarding human welfare; the third focuses on moral worth-the nature and grounds of moral assessment of persons as deserving esteem or blame. Hill shows moral, political, and social philosophers just how valuable moral (...)
  16. The Vienna Circle Revisited.Thomas E. Uebel, Christopher Hookway & London School of Economics and Political Science - 1995 - Lse Centre for the Philosophy of the Natural and Social Sciences.
  17.  85
    Thinking on Screen: Film as Philosophy.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2009 - Routledge.
    Thinking on Screen: Film as Philosophy is an accessible and thought-provoking examination of the way films raise and explore complex philosophical ideas. Written in a clear and engaging style, Thomas Wartenberg examines films’ ability to discuss, and even criticize ideas that have intrigued and puzzled philosophers over the centuries such as the nature of personhood, the basis of morality, and epistemological skepticism. Beginning with a demonstration of how specific forms of philosophical discourse are presented cinematically, Wartenberg moves on to (...)
  18.  3
    Stability, a Sense of Justice, and Self‐Respect.Thomas E. Hill - 2013 - In Jon Mandle & David A. Reidy (eds.), A Companion to Rawls. Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 200–215.
    This chapter summarizes briefly what John Rawls meant by stability, the role it plays in Theory of Justice (TJ), and the outline of his main strategies for showing that a well‐ordered society based on his principles of justice would be relatively stable. It presents comments on Rawls's use of developmental moral psychology in support of his claim that societies based on justice as fairness would be relatively stable. The chapter discusses Rawls's conception of self‐respect, its role in his arguments for (...)
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  19.  7
    Big ideas for little kids: teaching philosophy through children's literature.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2014 - Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Big Ideas for Little Kids includes everything a teacher, a parent, or a college student needs to teach philosophy to elementary school children from picture books. Written in a clear and accessible style, the book explains why it is important to allow young children access to philosophy during primary-school education. Wartenberg also gives advice on how to construct a "learner-centered" classroom, in which children discuss philosophical issues with one another as they respond to open-ended questions by saying whether they agree (...)
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  20. The Kantian conception of autonomy.Thomas E. Hill - 1989 - In John Philip Christman (ed.), The Inner citadel: essays on individual autonomy. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 91--105.
  21.  18
    Thomas E. Wartenberg’s Thinking Through Stories: Children, Philosophy, and Picture Books.Thomas E. Wartenberg, Stephen Kekoa Miller & Wendy C. Turgeon - 2023 - Precollege Philosophy and Public Practice 5:31-43.
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  22. A Taxonomy of Granular Partitions.Thomas E. Bittner & Barry Smith - 2001 - In Daniel Montello (ed.), Spatial Information Theory. Foundations of Geographic Information Science. Berlin: Springer. pp. 28-43.
    In this paper we propose a formal theory of partitions (ways of dividing up or sorting or mapping reality) and we show how the theory can be applied in the geospatial domain. We characterize partitions at two levels: as systems of cells (theory A), and in terms of their projective relation to reality (theory B). We lay down conditions of well-formedness for partitions and we define what it means for partitions to project truly onto reality. We continue by classifying well-formed (...)
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  23. Autonomy and benevolent lies.Thomas E. Hill - 1984 - Journal of Value Inquiry 18 (4):251-267.
  24. Anti-foundationalism and the vienna circle's revolution in philosophy.Thomas E. Uebel - 1996 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (3):415-440.
    The tendency to attribute foundationalist ambitions to the Vienna Circle has long obscured our view of its attempted revolution in philosophy. The present paper makes the case for a consistently epistemologically anti-foundationalist interpretation of all three of the Circle's main protagonists: Schlick, Carnap, and Neurath. Corresponding to the intellectual fault lines within the Circle, two ways of going about the radical reorientation of the pursuit of philosophy will then be distinguished and the contemporary potential of Carnap's and Neurath's project explored.
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  25. Logical empiricism and the sociology of knowledge: The case of Neurath and Frank.Thomas E. Uebel - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):150.
    Logical Empiricism is commonly regarded as uninterested in, if not hostile to sociological investigations of science. This paper reconstructs the views of Otto Neurath and Philipp Frank on the legitimacy and relevance of sociological investigations of theory choice. It is argued that while there obtains a surprising degree of convergence between their programmatic pronouncements and the Strong Programme, the two types of project nevertheless remain distinct. The key to this differences lies in the different assessment of a supposed dilemma facing (...)
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  26.  78
    Neurath's programme for naturalistic epistemology.Thomas E. Uebel - 1991 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 22 (4):623-646.
    I examine the thesis that Otto Neurath anticipated the programme of naturalised epistemology already at the time of the Vienna Circle and consider the relation between Neurath's proposals and those of two contemporary theorists whose research programmes he would thus have broadly anticipated. The thesis is confirmed by reference to Neurath's own writings. The connection between Neurath's programme and the programmes of his two successors considered here, however, is found to be highly indirect in one case and nonexistent in the (...)
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  27.  84
    Neurath's protocol statements: A naturalistic theory of data and pragmatic theory of theory acceptance.Thomas E. Uebel - 1993 - Philosophy of Science 60 (4):587-607.
    Neurath's proposal for the form of protocol statements explicates the multiple embedding of a singular sentence as specifying different conditions for the acceptance of such a sentence as a bona fide scientific datum. Before theories are accepted or rejected in the light of such evidence, however, a further condition must be met which Neurath did not formalize. The different conditions are discussed and shown to constitute a naturalistic theory of scientific data and a pragmatic theory of theory acceptance.
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  28.  5
    Back to Kant: the revival of Kantianism in German social and historical thought, 1860-1914.Thomas E. Willey - 1978 - Detroit: Wayne State University Press.
    Back to Kant is a study of the rise of the neo-Kantian movement from its origins in the 1850s to its academic preeminence in the years before World War I. Thomas E. Willey describes early neo-Kantianism as a reaction of scientists and scientific philosophers against both the then discredited Hegelianism and Naturphilosophie of the preceding era and the simplistic and deterministic scientific materialism of the 1850s. "Back to Kant" was the slogan of a revolt against theories of knowledge which (...)
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  29. Hegel's idealism: The logic of conceptuality'.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 1993 - In Frederick C. Beiser (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Hegel. Cambridge University Press. pp. 102--29.
     
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  30.  78
    Beyond mere illustration: How films can be philosophy.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2006 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (1):19–32.
  31. Kant on Virtue and the Virtues.Thomas E. Hill & Adam Cureton - 2014 - In Nancy Snow (ed.), Cultivating Virtue: Multiple Perspectives. pp. 87-110.
    Immanuel Kant is known for his ideas about duty and morally worthy acts, but his conception of virtue is less familiar. Nevertheless Kant’s understanding of virtue is quite distinctive and has considerable merit compared to the most familiar conceptions. Kant also took moral education seriously, writing extensively on both the duty of adults to cultivate virtue and the empirical conditions to prepare children for this life-long responsibility. Our aim is, first, to explain Kant’s conception of virtue, second, to highlight some (...)
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  32. Big Ideas for Little Kids: Teaching Philosophy Through Children's Literature, 2nd edition.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2014 - R&L Education.
    Big Ideas for Little Kids includes everything a teacher, a parent, or a college student needs to teach philosophy to elementary school children from picture books. Written in a clear and accessible style, the book explains why it is important to allow young children access to philosophy during primary-school education. Wartenberg also gives advice on how to construct a "learner-centered" classroom, in which children discuss philosophical issues with one another as they respond to open-ended questions by saying whether they agree (...)
     
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  33. Kant and Race.Thomas E. Hill & Bernard Boxill - 2000 - In Bernard Boxill (ed.), Race and Racism. Oxford University Press.
  34. The Hypothetical Imperative.Thomas E. Hill - 1973 - Philosophical Review 82 (4):429-450.
  35.  7
    The Stability Problem in Political Liberalism.Thomas E. Hill - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 75 (3-4):333-352.
  36. The importance of autonomy.Thomas E. Hill - 1987 - In Eva Feder Kittay & Diana T. Meyers (eds.), Women and Moral Theory. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 129--138.
  37.  67
    Carnap and Neurath in exile: Can their disputes be resolved?Thomas E. Uebel - 2001 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (2):211 – 220.
  38.  22
    7 Reason and the practice of science.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 1992 - In Paul Guyer (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Kant. Cambridge University Press. pp. 3--228.
  39.  17
    A Sneetch is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries: Finding Wisdom in Children's Literature.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Taking Picture Books Seriously: What can we learn about philosophy through children's books?_ This warm and charming volume casts a spell on adult readers as it unveils the surprisingly profound philosophical wisdom contained in children's picture books, from Dr Seuss's _Sneetches_ to William Steig's _Shrek!_. With a light touch and good humor, Wartenberg discusses the philosophical ideas in these classic stories, and provides parents with a practical starting point for discussing philosophical issues with their children. Accessible and multi-layered, it answers (...)
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  40.  45
    Deep brain stimulation to reward circuitry alleviates anhedonia in refractory major depression.Thomas E. Schlaepfer, Michael X. Cohen, Caroline Frick, Markus Mathaus Kosel, Daniela Brodesser, Nikolai Axmacher, Alexius Young Joe, Martina Kreft, Doris Lenartz & Volker Sturm - unknown
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) to different sites allows interfering with dysfunctional network function implicated in major depression. Because a prominent clinical feature of depression is anhedonia--the inability to experience pleasure from previously pleasurable activities--and because there is clear evidence of dysfunctions of the reward system in depression, DBS to the nucleus accumbens might offer a new possibility to target depressive symptomatology in otherwise treatment-resistant depression. Three patients suffering from extremely resistant forms of depression, who did not respond to pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, (...)
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  41.  13
    Suicide as a derangement of the self-sacrificial aspect of eusociality.Thomas E. Joiner, Melanie A. Hom, Christopher R. Hagan & Caroline Silva - 2016 - Psychological Review 123 (3):235-254.
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  42.  98
    Kant on wrongdoing, desert, and punishment.Thomas E. Hill - 1999 - Law and Philosophy 18 (4):407 - 441.
  43.  14
    Data and Context.Thomas E. Dickins - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):633-642.
    Deacon presents a fascinating model that adds to explanations of the origins of life from physical matter. Deacon’s paper owes much to the work of Howard Pattee, who saw semiotic relations in informational terms, and Deacon binds his model to criticism of current information concepts in biology which he sees as semantically inadequate. In this commentary I first outline the broader project from Pattee, and then I present a cybernetic perspective on information. My claim is that this view of information (...)
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  44. Building eco-surplus culture among urban inhabitants as a novel strategy to improve finance for conservation in protected areas.Minh-Hoang Nguyen & Thomas E. Jones - 2022 - Humanities and Social Sciences Communications 9:426.
    The rapidly declining biosphere integrity, representing one of the core planetary boundaries, is alarming. One of the most widely accepted measures to halt the rate of biodiversity loss is to maintain and expand protected areas that are effectively managed. However, it requires substantial finance derived from nature-based tourism, specifically visitors from urban areas. Using the Bayesian Mindsponge Framework (BMF) on 535 Vietnamese urban residents, the current study examined how their biodiversity loss perceptions can affect their willingness to pay for the (...)
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  45.  51
    Education, Enlightenment and Positivism: The Vienna Circle's Scientific World-Conception Revisited.Thomas E. Uebel - 2004 - Science & Education 13 (1-2):41-66.
  46.  20
    Values in Good Caring Relations.Thomas E. Randall - 2018 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 4 (3).
    In The Ethics of Care, Virginia Held explores what values of care might fulfil normative criteria for evaluating the moral worth of relations. Held identifies seven potential values: attentiveness, empathy, mutual concern, sensitivity, responsiveness, taking responsibility, and trustworthiness. Though Held’s work is helpful as a starting point for conceptualizing some normative criteria, two problems need addressing. First, Held does not provide sufficient justification for why these potential values ought to be considered genuine values in the care ethical framework. Second, Held (...)
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  47.  35
    Analyses do not support the parasite-stress theory of human sociality.Thomas E. Currie & Ruth Mace - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):83-85.
    Re-analysis of the data provided in the target article reveals a lack of evidence for a strong, universal relationship between parasite stress and the variables relating to sociality. Furthermore, even if associations between these variables do exist, the analyses presented here do not provide evidence for Fincher & Thornhill's (F&T's) proposed causal mechanism.
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  48.  18
    Kant's Argument for the Rationality of Moral Conduct.Thomas E. Hill - 1985 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 66 (1-2):3-23.
  49. Treating Criminals as Ends in Themselves.Thomas E. Hill - 2003 - Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 11.
    Bezugnehmend auf Kants Moralphilosophie entwickelt dieser Beitrag eine These dazu, was mit der Forderung gemeint sein soll, Personen unter Beachtung ihrer Würde bzw. als "Zweck an sich selbst" zu behandeln. Es wird vorgeschlagen, die Implikationen von Kants "Menschheitsformel" als ein Bündel von mit einander verwandten Vorschriften zu interpretieren, die das moralische Nachdenken darüber, wie die Prinzipien unserer tagtäglichen Entscheidungen spezifiziert und interpretiert werden sollten, leiten und begrenzen können. Der Beitrag bearbeitet sodann die folgenden drei Fragestellungen: Was folgt aus dem Vorangehenden (...)
     
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  50.  20
    Shankara and Indian Philosophy.Thomas E. Wood & Natalia Isayeva - 1994 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 114 (1):121.
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