Results for 'Thomas Foerster'

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Thomas Foerster
Cornell University (PhD)
  1.  56
    Stefan Burkhardt and Thomas Foerster, Eds., Norman Tradition and Transcultural Heritage: Exchange of Cultures in the “Norman” Peripheries of Medieval Europe. Farnham, Surrey, UK, and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2013. Pp. Vi, 305. $134.95. ISBN: 978-1-4094-6330-6.Keith J. Stringer and Andrew Jotischky, Eds., Norman Expansion: Connections, Continuities, and Contrasts. Farnham, Surrey, UK, and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2013. Pp. Xiv, 261; 10 Black-and-White Figures. $119.95. ISBN: 978-1-4094-4838-9. [REVIEW]Hugh M. Thomas - 2015 - Speculum 90 (2):514-516.
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  2.  10
    Proactive Control of Affective Distraction: Experience-Based but Not Expectancy-Based.Constantin Schmidts, Anna Foerster, Thomas Kleinsorge & Wilfried Kunde - 2020 - Cognition 194:104072.
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  3.  11
    Affective Distraction Along the Flexibility-Stability Continuum.Anna Foerster, Constantin Schmidts, Thomas Kleinsorge & Wilfried Kunde - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 34 (3):438-449.
    This study explored whether conditions that promote flexibility in task processing enhance the detrimental impact of irrelevant negative stimulation on performance. We approached this flexibility f...
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  4. Epistemic Gaps and the Mind-Body Problem.Thomas Foerster - 2019 - Dissertation, Cornell University
    This dissertation defends materialism from the epistemic arguments against materialism. Materialism is the view that everything is ultimately physical. The epistemic arguments against materialism claim that there is an epistemic gap between physical and phenomenal truths (for example, that knowing the physical truths does not put you in a position to know the phenomenal truths), and conclude from this that there is a corresponding gap in the world between physical and phenomenal truths, and materialism is false. -/- Chapter 1 introduces (...)
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  5. Moral Offsetting.Thomas Foerster - 2019 - Philosophical Quarterly 69 (276):617-635.
    This paper explores the idea of moral offsetting: the idea that good actions can offset bad actions in a way roughly analogous to carbon offsetting. For example, a meat eater might try to offset their consumption of meat by donating to an animal welfare charity. In this paper, I clarify the idea of moral offsetting, consider whether the leading moral theories and theories of moral worth are consistent with the possibility of moral offsetting, and consider potential benefits of moral offsetting. (...)
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  6.  81
    Computing a Reality. Heinz von Foerster's Lecture at the A.U.M Conference in 1973. Edited by Albert Müller.Foerster H. Von & A. Müller - 2008 - Constructivist Foundations 4 (1).
    Purpose: Commenting on the transcript of a lecture. Findings: The document reconstructs the development of the original 1973 lecture by Heinz von Foerster into his best-known paper, On Constructing a Reality. Many aspects of that paper can be identified as being shaped through interaction with the audience. Implications: The lecture documented here was a forerunner of a central paper in constructivism.
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  7.  43
    Computing a Reality. Heinz von Foerster's Lecture at the A.U.M Conference in 1973. Edited by Albert Müller.H. Foerster & A. Müller - 2008 - Constructivist Foundations 4 (1):62-69.
  8. Konstruktivismus Und Kognitionswissenschaft Kulturelle Wurzeln Und Ergebnisse : Heinz von Foerster Gewidmet.Heinz Von Foerster, Albert Müller & Friedrich Stadler - 1997
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  9.  70
    The Unknown Before Discovery.Mauro Maldonato - 2005 - World Futures 61 (3):174 – 180.
    Starting from the most important conquests of contemporary post-positivistic epistemology and from its authors such as Karl Popper, Thomas Kuhn, Paul Feyerabend, and Edgar Morin and going through Gadamer's hermeneutics or Wittgenstein and de Mandeville's approaches to scientific and social paradigms, this article focuses on the limits of scientific dogmas and on the overbearing rationalism that claims to explain everything, marginalizing many aspects of human life which cannot be rationalized. The scientific approach cannot be just conceptual. It must be (...)
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  10. Principles of Self-Organization: Transactions of the University of Illinois Symposium.H. Von Foerster & G. W. Zopf Jr, (eds.) - 1962 - Pergamon Press.
  11.  34
    The Historian as Public Moralist: The Case of Christopher Lasch: Thomas Bender.Thomas Bender - 2012 - Modern Intellectual History 9 (3):733-744.
    When I entered graduate school in the fall of 1966, planning to study American intellectual history and perhaps intellectuals specifically, all the talk among the more advanced graduate students was a recently published book, The New Radicalism in America, 1889–1963: The Intellectual as a Social Type, by Christopher Lasch. I read it eagerly, but I was not sure what to make of it. The author, Christopher Lasch, offered a very complex analysis of intellectuals’ lives and their social location—or lack of (...)
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  12.  5
    Art and Life in Avant-Garde Prague, 1920–1924*: Thomas Ort.Thomas Ort - 2010 - Modern Intellectual History 7 (1):63-92.
    This essay outlines the unique interpretation of the avant-garde formulated in the early 1920s by the Czech novelist, playwright, and cultural critic Karel Čapek. Whereas in Theory of the Avant-Garde Peter Bürger argued that the central problem of the avant-garde was its failure to effect a genuine reconciliation of art and life, Čapek, in contrast, worried about the prospect of success. Closely observing the practices of the Czech avant-garde group Devětsil, Čapek interpreted its attempt to fuse art and life in (...)
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  13. Review of Thomas S. Kuhn The Essential Tension: Selected Studies in Scientific Tradition and Change. [REVIEW]David Zaret - 1981 - Philosophical Review 90 (1):146.
  14. Thomas Reid’s Geometry of Visibles.James van Cleve - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (3):373-416.
    In a brief but remarkable section of the Inquiry into the Human Mind, Thomas Reid argued that the visual field is governed by principles other than the familiar theorems of Euclid—theorems we would nowadays classify as Riemannian. On the strength of this section, he has been credited by Norman Daniels, R. B. Angell, and others with discovering non-Euclidean geometry over half a century before the mathematicians—sixty years before Lobachevsky and ninety years before Riemann. I believe that Reid does indeed (...)
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  15.  5
    Involuntary Top-Down Control by Search-Irrelevant Features: Visual Working Memory Biases Attention in an Object-Based Manner.Rebecca M. Foerster & Werner X. Schneider - 2018 - Cognition 172:37-45.
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  16.  6
    Commentary: Feeling the Conflict: The Crucial Role of Conflict Experience in Adaptation.Anna Foerster, Roland Pfister, Heiko Reuss & Wilfried Kunde - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  17.  54
    Interpreting Thomas Kuhn as a Response-Dependence Theorist.Nathaniel Goldberg - 2011 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (5):729 - 752.
    Abstract Thomas Kuhn is the most famous historian and philosopher of science of the last century. He is also among the most controversial. Since Kuhn's death, his corpus has been interpreted, systematized, and defended. Here I add to this endeavor in a novel way by arguing that Kuhn can be interpreted as a global response-dependence theorist. He can be understood as connecting all concepts and terms in an a priori manner to responses of suitably situated subjects to objects in (...)
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  18.  16
    Cybernetics: Circular Causal and Feedback Mechanisms in Biological and Social Systems.H. von Foerster - 1953 - Philosophy of Science 20 (4):346-347.
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  19.  40
    Thomas Kuhn.Thomas Nickles (ed.) - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    Contemporary Philosophy in Focus offers a series of introductory volumes to many of the dominant philosophical thinkers of the current age. Thomas Kuhn, the author of The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, is probably the best-known and most influential historian and philosopher of science of the last 25 years, and has become something of a cultural icon. His concepts of paradigm, paradigm change and incommensurability have changed the way we think about science. This volume offers an introduction to Kuhn's life (...)
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  20.  27
    Long-Term Memory-Based Control of Attention in Multi-Step Tasks Requires Working Memory: Evidence From Domain-Specific Interference.Rebecca M. Foerster, Elena Carbone & Werner X. Schneider - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  21.  18
    Size Estimates Remain Stable in the Face of Differences in Performance Outcome Variability in an Aiming Task.Anna Foerster, Rob Gray & Rouwen Cañal-Bruland - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 33:47-52.
  22.  44
    A Qualified Defence of a Naturalist Theory of Health.Thomas Schramme - 2006 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (1):11-17.
    The paper contrasts Lennart Nordenfelt’s normative theory of health with the naturalists’ point of view, especially in the version developed by Christopher Boorse. In the first part it defends Boorse’s analysis of disease against the charge that it falls short of its own standards by not being descriptive. The second part of the paper sets out to analyse the positive concept of health and introduces a distinction between a positive definition of health (‘health’ is not defined as absence of disease (...)
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  23.  12
    Thomas Reid’s Geometry of Visibles.James van Cleve - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (3):373-416.
    In a brief but remarkable section of the Inquiry into the Human Mind, Thomas Reid argued that the visual field is governed by principles other than the familiar theorems of Euclid—theorems we would nowadays classify as Riemannian. On the strength of this section, he has been credited by Norman Daniels, R. B. Angell, and others with discovering non-Euclidean geometry over half a century before the mathematicians—sixty years before Lobachevsky and ninety years before Riemann. I believe that Reid does indeed (...)
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  24.  18
    The Right to Refuse Diagnostics and Treatment Planning by Artificial Intelligence.Thomas Ploug & Søren Holm - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (1):107-114.
    In an analysis of artificially intelligent systems for medical diagnostics and treatment planning we argue that patients should be able to exercise a right to withdraw from AI diagnostics and treatment planning for reasons related to the physician’s role in the patients’ formation of and acting on personal preferences and values, the bias and opacity problem of AI systems, and rational concerns about the future societal effects of introducing AI systems in the health care sector.
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  25.  26
    Arnauld and the Cartesian Philosophy of Ideas.Thomas M. Lennon - 1989 - Philosophical Review 101 (3):644-647.
  26. Integrative Social Contracts Theory: Thomas Donaldson & Thomas W. Dunfee.Thomas Donaldson - 1995 - Economics and Philosophy 11 (1):85-112.
    Difficult moral issues in economic life, such as evaluating the impact of hostile takeovers and plant relocations or determining the obligations of business to the environment, constitute the raison d'etre of business ethics. Yet, while the ultimate resolution of such issues clearly requires detailed, normative analysis, a shortcoming of business ethics is that to date it has failed to develop an adequate normative theory. 1 The failing is especially acute when it results in an inability to provide a basis for (...)
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  27.  20
    The Religion of Socrates.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Mark L. McPherran - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (2):279.
    This book is without doubt the most meticulously researched, carefully argued, and comprehensive study of Socratic religion to date. When McPherran refers to the religion of Socrates, he means the religion of the historical Socrates. Like many contemporary scholars, McPherran thinks that Plato’s early dialogues are generally reliable sources for the views of the historical Socrates. With uncommon clarity, the author develops the philosophical and religious commitments of this Socrates and shows how they are really complementary parts of a single (...)
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  28.  55
    When Liberal Peoples Turn Into Outlaw States: John Rawls’ Law of Peoples and Liberal Nuclearism.Thomas E. Doyle - 2015 - Journal of International Political Theory 11 (2):257-273.
    John Rawls’ account in Law of Peoples of a realist utopia composed of a society of liberal and decent peoples is a stark contrast to his description of “outlaw states,” which seek to undermine the legal and moral frameworks that constitute a pacific global order. Rawls argues that outlaw states cannot conceive of political accommodation with their external enemies; instead, they opt for the rule of force, terror, and brutality. Rawls even urges that liberal peoples are justified in maintaining a (...)
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  29.  65
    Propositions. [REVIEW]Thomas Hodgson - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 24 (4):585-587.
  30.  80
    Review: Thomas Pink's The Psychology of Freedom (1996 CUP). [REVIEW]Randolph Clarke - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (4):634-637.
    Our conception of freedom requires, then, that decisions have an "executive function": making a decision must ensure that one will remain motivated to act as decided, and, provided that the decision is rational, it must leave one disposed to act rationally in performing the action decided upon. Second, since, as we conceive our freedom, it is by making decisions that we exercise control over future actions, decisions must themselves be actions. Most of the book is devoted to developing and defending (...)
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  31.  67
    Thomas Reid's Inquiry and Essays.Thomas Reid - 1863 - Bobbs-Merrill.
    INTRODUCTION Although the writings of Thomas Reid are very fertile and interesting, his life is biographically barren in comparison to such seventeenth - and ...
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  32.  85
    Thomas Hobbes and the Ethics of Freedom.Thomas Pink - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (5):541 - 563.
    Abstract Freedom in the sense of free will is a multiway power to do any one of a number of things, leaving it up to us which one of a range of options by way of action we perform. What are the ethical implications of our possession of such a power? The paper examines the pre-Hobbesian scholastic view of writers such as Peter Lombard and Francisco Suárez: freedom as a multiway power is linked to the right to liberty understood as (...)
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  33.  25
    Carnap’s Construction of the World: The Aufbau and the Emergence of Logical Empiricism. [REVIEW]Thomas Uebel - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (3):447-450.
    Faced with anti-foundationalist revisionism on part of recent Vienna Circle scholarship, veterans of the struggle against the so-called dogmas of logical empiricism could be forgiven were they to fail to recognize their old adversaries. Clearly everything depends on how the logical empiricists are read: their record does not speak for itself. That already in their day the logical empiricists faced the declaredly friendly fire that nearly sealed their fate suggests, however, that the reconstructive explication and contextualization required be exceedingly subtle. (...)
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  34.  12
    Sociedad mapuche y sociedad chilena: la deuda histórica.Rolf Foerster - 2002 - Polis 2.
    El artículo presenta una visión histórica de la sociedad mapuche y del vínculo “interétnico”; y por otro lado se refiere a los diversos modos de comprensión de “Chile”, para examinar el tema de la existencia o no de una “deuda histórica” con la sociedad mapuche. Remarca que con el advenimiento de la República, los mapuche dejaron de ser vistos como un pueblo o nación y comienzan a ser tratados como chilenos, con lo que se puso fin a la política colonial (...)
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  35.  15
    Justificatory Liberalism: An Essay on Epistemology and Political Theory.Thomas Christiano - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (3):455.
    Gerald Gaus has written a stimulating and thoroughly argued book. His main aim is to show that the kind of liberalism that is underwritten by the ideal of public reasoning and justification is compatible with the extensive facts of disagreement that we see in contemporary societies regarding justice and politics. Gaus argues that the liberalisms of Rawls and Larmore suffer from the fact that they rely on something quite close to actual consensus on political principles in society. They either end (...)
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  36.  13
    The Recent Work of Jürgen Habermas: Reason, Justice and Modernity.Thomas McCarthy - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (3):530-533.
  37.  29
    Negative Recognition: Master and Slave in the Workplace.Thomas Klikauer - 2016 - Thesis Eleven 132 (1):39-49.
    The publications of Taylor and Honneth have ignited a renewed interest in the Hegelian theme of recognition. But recognition has not only positive aspects, as there are also negative connotations to recognition seen as misrecognition. What might be termed negative recognition argues that there is more to recognition than simple misrecognition. This article aims to show that negative recognition reaches beyond misrecognition and non-recognition. The paper argues that there are at least four versions of negative recognition. These are misrecognition, non-recognition, (...)
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  38.  19
    L’Affaire Faye: Faut-Il Brûler Heidegger?Thomas Sheehan - 2016 - Philosophy Today 60 (2):481-535.
    L’affaire Faye: Johannes Fritsche’s bizarre Historical Destiny and National Socialism in Heidegger’s Being and Time mistranslates every key term in Sein und Zeit §74 and distorts the entire book. Gaëtan Pégny’s justification of Emmanuel Faye’s mistranslations of Heidegger is beyond irresponsible. François Rastier’s “Open Letter to Philosophy Today” lends uncritical support to Faye’s dubious “scholarship.”.
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  39.  44
    Sartre as Philosopher of the Imagination.Thomas Flynn - 2006 - Philosophy Today 50 (Supplement):106-112.
  40.  14
    Refiguring the Subaltern.Peter D. Thomas - 2018 - Political Theory 46 (6):861-884.
    The subaltern has frequently been understood as a figure of exclusion ever since it was first highlighted by the early Subaltern Studies collective’s creative reading of Antonio Gramsci’s carceral writings. In this article, I argue that a contextualist and diachronic study of the development of the notion of subaltern classes throughout Gramsci’s full Prison Notebooks reveals new resources for “refiguring” the subaltern. I propose three alternative figures to comprehend specific dimensions of Gramsci’s theorizations: the “irrepressible subaltern,” the “hegemonic subaltern,” and (...)
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  41.  15
    Pragmatic Liberalism and the Critique of Modernity.Thomas Mccarthy - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (1):114.
    There is a genre of contemporary philosophy that fits neatly neither the “analytic” nor the “continental” style but straddles both, seeking to combine the former’s rigor of analysis and argument with the latter’s breadth of historical and cultural perspective. Its practitioners emerge from both traditions and tend to be regarded by the more orthodox as out of the mainstream of each. In this regard, the three subjects of Gutting’s study—Richard Rorty, Alasdair MacIntyre, and Charles Taylor—have more in common with analytically (...)
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  42.  23
    Finding Value in Nature.Thomas Hill - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (3):331-341.
    This paper explores the idea that a proper valuing of natural environments is essential to a broader human virtue that might be called 'appreciation of the good'. This kind of valuing can explain, without any commitment to a metaphysics of intrinsic values, how and why it is good to value certain natural phenomena for their own sakes. The objection that such an approach is excessively human-centred is considered and rebutted.
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  43. A Note on the Epistemology of Disagreement and Politics.Thomas Mulligan - 2016 - Political Theory 44 (5):657-663.
    Martin Ebeling argues that a popular theory in the epistemology of disagreement--conciliationism--supports an egalitarian approach to politics. This view is mistaken for two reasons. First, even if political parties have the epistemic value that Ebeling claims, voters should not regard each other as epistemic peers--which conciliationism requires that they do. The American electorate is strikingly heterogeneous in both its knowledgeability and its rationality, and so the necessary epistemic parity relation does not hold. Second, for technical reasons, the beliefs that a (...)
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  44.  78
    The Last Word.Simon Blackburn & Thomas Nagel - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (4):653.
    Like all of Nagel's work, this is a book with a message: an apparently clear, simple message, forcefully presented and repeated. The message is that there is a limit to the extent to which we can "get outside" fundamental forms of thought, including logical, mathematical, scientific, and ethical thought. "Getting outside" means taking up a biological or psychological or sociological or economic or political view of ourselves as thinkers. It also inclines many people to talk of the contingency or subjectivity (...)
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  45. The Many Encounters of Thomas Kuhn and French Epistemology.Simons Massimiliano - 2017 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 61:41-50.
    The work of Thomas Kuhn has been very influential in Anglo-American philosophy of science and it is claimed that it has initiated the historical turn. Although this might be the case for English speaking countries, in France an historical approach has always been the rule. This article aims to investigate the similarities and differences between Kuhn and French philosophy of science or ‘French epistemology’. The first part will argue that he is influenced by French epistemologists, but by lesser known (...)
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  46.  23
    A Historical and Systematic Survey of European Perceptions of Wilderness.Thomas Kirchhoff & Vera Vicenzotti - 2014 - Environmental Values 23 (4):443-464.
    This paper develops a historical and systematic typology of perceptions of wilderness that exist in contemporary western European cultures. After describing notions of wilderness associated with worldviews that emerged during the Enlightenment period and as a critical response to it, we outline four recent transformations of these traditional notions of wilderness: wilderness as an ecological object, as a place of nature's self-reassertion, as a place of thrill and as a sphere of amorality and meaninglessness. In our conclusion, we suggest what (...)
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  47.  20
    Socratic Wisdom: The Model of Knowledge in Plato’s Early Dialogues. [REVIEW]Christine Thomas - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (4):590-593.
    Socrates expresses at least some interest in the knowledge of knowledge as an ability “to divide things and say that one is knowledge and the other is not knowledge”. If Hugh Benson’s characteristically lucid and careful book succeeds in its portrayal of Socrates as epistemologist, then the Charmides text is perhaps more optimistic than is often conceded. For unlike Gregory Vlastos’s Socrates, who was “no epistemologist, ” Benson’s promises “a philosophically complex, fundamentally coherent, and remarkably influential model of knowledge, ” (...)
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  48.  43
    Exemplars and Nudges: Combining Two Strategies for Moral Education.Engelen Bart, Thomas Alan, Alfred Archer & van de Ven Niels - 2018 - Journal of Moral Education 47 (3):346-365.
    This article defends the use of narratives about morally exemplary individuals in moral education and appraises the role that ‘nudge’ strategies can play in combination with such an appeal to exemplars. It presents a general conception of the aims of moral education and explains how the proposed combination of both moral strategies serves these aims. An important aim of moral education is to make the ethical perspective of the subject—the person being educated—more structured, more salient and therefore more ‘navigable’. This (...)
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  49.  88
    To Help or Not to Help? The Good Samaritan Effect and the Love of Money on Helping Behavior.Thomas Li-Ping Tang, Toto Sutarso, Grace Mei-Tzu Wu Davis, Dariusz Dolinski, Abdul Hamid Safwat Ibrahim & Sharon Lynn Wagner - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):865-887.
    This research tests a model of employee helping behavior (a component of Organizational Citizenship Behavior, OCB) that involves a direct path (Intrinsic Motives → Helping Behavior, the Good Samaritan Effect) and an indirect path (the Love of Money → Extrinsic Motives → Helping Behavior). Results for the full sample supported the Good Samaritan Effect. Further, the love of money was positively related to extrinsic motives that were negatively related with helping behavior. We tested the model across four cultures (the USA., (...)
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  50.  6
    Scientific Second-Order ’Nudging’ or Lobbying by Interest Groups: The Battle Over Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening Programmes.Thomas Ploug, Søren Holm & John Brodersen - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (4):641-650.
    The idea that it is acceptable to ‘nudge’ people to opt for the ‘healthy choice’ is gaining currency in health care policy circles. This article investigates whether researchers evaluating Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening Programmes attempt to influence decision makers in ways that are similar to popular ‘nudging’ techniques. Comparing two papers on the health economics of AAASP both published in the BMJ within the last 3 years, it is shown that the values chosen for the health economics modelling are not (...)
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