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  1.  11
    Rethinking dementia as a queer way of life and as ‘crip possibility’: A critique of the concept of person in person‐centredness.Thomas Foth & Annette Leibing - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy 23 (1).
    The concept of person‐centeredness has become in many instances the standard of health care that humanises services and ensures that the patient/client is at the centre of care delivery. Rejecting a purely biomedical explanation of dementia that led to a loss of self, personhood in dementia could be maintained through social interaction and communication. In this article, we use the insights of queer theory to contribute to our current understanding of the care of those with dementia. We critically discuss the (...)
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  2.  25
    Neoliberalism and the government of nursing through competency‐based education.Thomas Foth & Dave Holmes - 2017 - Nursing Inquiry 24 (2):e12154.
    Competency has become a key concept in education in general over the last four decades. This article examines the development of the competency‐based movement with a particular focus on the significance it has had for nursing education. Our hypothesis is that the competency movement can only adequately be understood if it is analyzed in relation to the broad societal transformation of the last decades—often summarized under the catchword neoliberalism—and with it the emergence of managerial models for Human Resource Management (HRM) (...)
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  3.  28
    Nursing history as philosophy—towards a critical history of nursing.Thomas Foth, Jette Lange & Kylie Smith - 2018 - Nursing Philosophy 19 (3):e12210.
    Mainstream nursing history often positions itself in opposition to philosophy and many nursing historians are reticent of theorizing. In the quest to illuminate the lives of nurses and women current historical approaches are driven by reformist aspirations but are based on the conception that nursing or caring is basically good and the timelessness of universal values. This has the effect of essentialising political categories of identity such as class, race and gender. This kind of history is about affirmation rather than (...)
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  4.  19
    Humanitarian reason and the movement for overdose prevention sites: The NGOization of the Opioid “Crisis”.Thomas Foth - 2021 - Nursing Philosophy 22 (1):e12324.
    In August 2017, a group of activists erected in Ottawa's downtown a tent as a first overdose prevention site as a response to what the public and the activists perceived as an epidemic—a devastating wave of opioid and fentanyl overdoses in Canada. The Ontario premier was urged to declare an emergency that would provide increased funding for harm reduction and also send a message to survivors and families that the lives of their loved ones mattered. Thus, the discourses around the (...)
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  5.  20
    Nurses, medical records and the killing of sick persons before, during and after the Nazi regime in Germany.Thomas Foth - 2013 - Nursing Inquiry 20 (2):93-100.
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  6.  28
    Expanding our understanding of sovereign power: on the creation of zones of exception in forensic psychiatry.Jean Daniel Jacob & Thomas Foth - 2013 - Nursing Philosophy 14 (3):178-185.
    The purpose of this paper is to engage with the readers in a theoretical reflection on nursing practices in forensic psychiatric settings. In this paper, we argue that practices of exclusion in forensic psychiatric settings share some common ground with Agamben's description of sovereign power and, consequently, the possible creation of zones of exception in this environment. The concept of exception is, therefore, purposely used to shift our thinking, highlight the political forces surrounding exclusionary practices in forensic psychiatric nursing, and (...)
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  7.  3
    A critical ethnographic perspective on risk and dangerousness in forensic psychiatry.Jean-Laurent Domingue, Jean-Daniel Jacob, Amélie Perron, Pierre Pariseau-Legault & Thomas Foth - 2023 - Nursing Inquiry 30 (2):e12521.
    In the Canadian forensic psychiatric context, the concepts of risk and dangerousness interact, intersect, and morph into the notion of significant threat to the safety of the public. Stemming from the results of a critical ethnography of the Ontario Review Board, this article unpacks the central role of forensic psychiatric nursing, as an example of a 'psych' discipline (e.g., psychiatry and psychology), in a system that is built to produce risky persons and to legitimize their detention and supervision. By using (...)
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  8.  9
    Critical approaches in nursing theory and nursing research: implications for nursing practice.Thomas Foth, Dave Holmes, Manfred Hülsken-Giesler, Susanne Kreutzer & Hartmut Remmers (eds.) - 2017 - Göttingen: V & R unipress, Universitätsverlag Osnabrück.
    This comprehensive collection offers a unique look at nursing practice, theory, research and nursing history from various critical theoretical perspectives. It aims to initiate an international discussion among scholars from diverse countries, particularly Germany and Anglo-American countries, coming from distinctive schools of thought, e.g. German Critical theory and Post-structural approaches, and influenced by their respective histories of sciences. This book analyzes and criticizes nursing theory, nursing research and practice along several dimensions: Nursing Ethics, Subjectivity, Body and Flesh (Leib), Technology, Power, (...)
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  9.  17
    Governing through lifestyle—Lalonde and the biopolitical management of public health in Canada.Thomas Foth & Dave Holmes - 2018 - Nursing Philosophy 19 (4):e12222.
    In 1974, the Liberal government of Pierre Trudeau released a “green paper” known as the Lalonde Report, after the health minister at that time. The report formulated perspectives on health and the main concepts and ideas developed in it, particularly the concept of “lifestyle,” which became the foundation of public health policies in many different European countries and the United States. The concept of “lifestyle” connected personal behaviour and habits to the individual health condition; people were not dying due to (...)
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  10.  12
    Health prevention in the era of biosocieties: a critical analysis of the ‘Seek‐and‐Treat’ paradigm in HIV / AIDS prevention.Thomas Foth, Patrick O'Byrne & Dave Holmes - 2016 - Nursing Inquiry 23 (2):99-108.
    On 18 November 2014, the United Nations launched an urgent new campaign to end AIDS as a global health threat by 2030. With its proposed strategy, the UN follows leading scientists who had declared the failure of former prevention strategies and now were promoting a ‘Seek and Treat for Optimal Prevention’ (STOP) approach as the most cost‐effective response to the pandemic to meet the goal of ‘an AIDS‐free generation’. STOP combines antiretroviral therapy and routine HIV screening to find persons unaware (...)
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  11.  10
    Which lives are worth saving? Biolegitimacy and harm reduction during COVID‐19.Catherine Larocque & Thomas Foth - 2021 - Nursing Inquiry 28 (4):e12417.
    Despite the promise to save every life, the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed social and racial inequalities, precarious living conditions, and engendered an exponential increase in overdose deaths. Although some lives are considered sacred, others are deliberately sacrificed. This article draws on the theoretical work of Foucault and scholars who further developed his concept of biopolitics. While biopolitics aims to ameliorate the health of populations, Foucault never systematically accounted for the unequal value of lives. In the name of saving the biological (...)
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